Crystal Compass

Travel Today in United States

Explore United States

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

 

 

Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

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Tickets & Passes

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Casinos

Dig This Las Vegas

Who says kids get to have all of the fun? This larger-than-life sandbox is the perfect place for adults to get back to their youth and experience the thrill of operating massive machinery in a model construction site.After brief safety instructions, travelers choose from a variety of bulldozers or excavators and hop behind the wheel, where a professional guide offers a brief orientation before the earth really starts to move. Learn to dig the ground below, play a round of “Excavator Basketball” or ride a “Bulldozer Teeter-Totter”. This one-of-a-kind experience is one of the best ways to feel like a kid again—even on a trip to Sin City!

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Land Activities & Tours

Hell's Revenge Trail

With its steep climbs and deep descents, the Hell’s Revenge Trail offers some of the best views of the Colorado River, La Sal Mountains, Negro Bill Canyon, and the Abyss Canyon. At nearly 7.5 miles long, the challenging trail loops through the sandstone and slickrock of the scenic Moab Valley. It takes those brave enough to walk its roller coaster track through narrow canyons, Navajo sandstone formations, and vast pools of water. Views are often exceptional.Steep hills and tight turns keep visitors to this trail on edge (literally). Names of spots such as Devil’s Driveway, Hell’s Gate, the Tip Over Challenge, and the Escalator, this trail is not for the faint of heart — but those adventurous enough to take it on will be rewarded with sweeping views of the surrounding natural scenery.

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Scenic Landmarks

Marvin Braude Bike Trail

Formally named the Marvin Braude Bike Path (after a long-serving L.A. City Council member who championed the preservation of open space in the Santa Monica Mountains), but most locals call this epic ribbon of seaside concrete the Santa Monica Bike Path or The Strand. This skating-, jogging-, biking- and pedestrian-friendly thoroughfare stretches 26 miles alongside the Pacific Ocean from Will Rogers State Beach in Pacific Palisades to the far end of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, in Torrance.The journey is almost entirely flat and passes by numerous public restrooms and eateries, especially at Venice Beach and Manhattan Beach. By any means, traveling the path is an ideal activity for families and couples, or anyone who wants to find a bit of quiet time and fresh air while visiting this enormous city renowned for its traffic.The Santa Monica Pier makes an excellent starting point for a bike-path journey, and offers several places to rent bicycles.

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Water & Amusement Parks

Pioneer Park

This 44-acre (109-hectare) city park is located along the Chena River and is Alaska’s only historic theme park. It was opened in 1967 as Alaska 67 Centennial Exposition in order to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Alaska Purchase. Today, the park is home to a number of restaurants, museums, attractions, shops and art spaces, with over 30 places of interest in total.While the Alaska Native Museum teaches visitors about Eskimos and Native Alaska cultures, the Pioneer Air Museum displays aviation memorabilia and aircrafts. Hungry? Enjoy fresh local fish from Salmon Bake or stroll around while savoring a refreshing treat from the Gold Rush Ice Cream Parlour. If you’re interested in the arts the Palace Theatre puts on a lighthearted performance about Fairbanks from history to present day, while Bear Gallery allows you to view works created by local artists.

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Scenic Landmarks

Atlanta Beltline

An ambitious “rails-to-trails” project, the Atlanta Beltline transforms the city’s trash-collecting tracks into more than 22 miles of footpaths for bikers, runners and pedestrians. The Beltline, a work in progress, merges the city's parks and green spaces, connects neighborhoods to each other and makes public transit more accessible. The Beltline shows off the very best parts of Atlanta.The popular Eastside Trail and the Historic Fourth Ward Park are two projects, among many others, that have been completed. A planned streetcar is in the works, an addition that will connect the furthest reaches of the Beltline to more popular, central attractions in Atlanta. Some of the other highlights include 33 miles of multi-use trails, 1,300 acres of parks, more public art and historic preservation efforts.

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Wildlife & Zoos

Honolulu Zoo

The shriek of the Honolulu Zoo’s population of endangered white-handed gibbons is a familiar morning sound to Waikiki’s regular surfing contingent; the zoo is just across the street from some of the most popular beginner surf breaks toward the far end of Waikiki near Diamond Head crater. In addition to the monkeys, the sprawling 42-acre open-air zoo is home to more than 900 tropical animals including elephants, black rhino, giraffe, Sumatran tiger, aardvark, meerkat, orangutan, birds, reptiles and more. The zoo also houses animals only found in Hawaii, including the state bird, the nēnē, as well as a number of endemic plants in and around the enclosures.

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Geological Formations

Boynton Canyon Trail

Boynton Canyon Trail’s breathtaking red rocks views and easy passes make it one Sedona’s most accessible hikes. Travelers find impressive panoramic landscapes early in the three-mile trek, where open desert, lush foliage and sky-high canyon views reign supreme. And while some say this accessible hike ends in a rather anti-climactic way because box canyon walls stretch up on either side, ancient Sinaguan Indian ruins and tons of biodiversity make it a memorable outdoor experience for visitors to Sedona.

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See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

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Nature and Wildlife Tours

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Places of Natural Beauty

Russian River

California's Russian River is one of the largest in the San Francisco Bay Area, starting in Mendocino County and cutting through Sonoma County on its way to the ocean.The entire Russian River runs more than 110 miles from its source to the Pacific Ocean, and much of the area is popular as a tourist destination. Towns like Healdsburg, Cloverdale, Santa Rosa, Geyserville, Sebastopol, Jenner and Bodega Bay are all draws for outdoor recreation, fine dining and winery visits. The river itself is great for canoeing, swimming, and fishing from spring through fall. In the beautiful countryside on either side of the river you can go horseback riding, hiking, camping or golfing. The Russian River Valley is famous for its wineries, known for its Chardonnay and Pinot Noir – and that thriving wine culture brings with it a thriving food culture. You can take wine tasting tours in the area, and cap them off with excellent meals in nearly any town throughout the Russian River Valley.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Mirror Lake

Located in Yosemite Valley, Mirror Lake is famous for its reflections of Half Dome and Mount Watkins when the water level is high enough; to be fair, it's more of a pond than a lake. But it's a pretty pond that can be accessed by an easy two-mile round trip stroll from the valley floor.If photographs are what you're looking to capture, be sure to visit in the spring and early summer; birders will enjoy catching glimpses of white-headed woodpeckers and martens. If you’d prefer a circumferential view of the lake, there’s a five-mile (eight kilometer) loop hike that is sure to satisfy.

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Gardens & Parks

Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum

Created on the site of what was once a miniature golf course, the Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum is now home to more than 500 palms and cycads, representing more than 150 different species from around the world. Starting with just 60 palms representing 10 different species, the two-acre park has continuously expanded since its 1977 dedication. From massive specimens that are too big to fit in private yards to popular types that can be found along Florida’s beaches, the Palm Arboretum is an ever-changing, never-ending project that grows and expands organically. Take the time to stroll down the pathways, learning about the specimens, or simply perch on one of the conversation benches and enjoy the peace of the palms.

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Geological Formations

Browns Canyon National Monument

The Browns Canyon National Monument is an area around the Arkansas River that's long been a popular recreational area. The nearly 22,000-acre area of the Arkansas River that is contained within the Browns Canyon National Monument is the United States' most popular place for whitewater rafting. It is also popular for its hiking and fishing opportunities. Prior to becoming a National Monument in 2015, the area had also been popular with hunters. With the designation, animals such as bighorn sheep, elk, and golden eagles are more protected.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Boyd Hill Nature Preserve

Florida’s Gulf Coast is haven for all kinds of interesting and exotic wildlife, and the Boyd Hill Nature Preserve near St. Petersburg offers the chance to explore unique ecosystems, including hardwood hammocks, sand pine scrub, pine flatwoods, swamp woodlands, willow marsh and lake shore. The 245-acre park has six miles of trail and boardwalk along the shore of Lake Maggiore, where you can spot alligators and lizards, myriad birds, butterflies and much more. The park also has an aviary for birds of prey, picnic areas, a playground and overnight camping.

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Places of Natural Beauty

McDowell Sonoran Preserve

If there’s a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts, McDowell Sonoran Preserve just might be it. With more than 30,000 acres, including the McDowell Mountains, visitors can hike it, bike it or even climb it.With more than 120 miles of trails, picking which way to go can be tough, so ask the experts. Most mornings McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Pathfinders are on duty at the Brown's Ranch Trailhead, Gateway Trailhead, Lost Dog Wash Trailhead, Sunrise Trailhead and Tom’s Thumb Trailhead. Pathfinders have all sorts of information and suggestions to insure a fun, safe day on the trails.Fit families will enjoy the way the Family Passport keeps everyone moving together. Scavenger hunts for animal tracks, rocks and other nature provided attractions can provide inspiration for hours of exploring. When you visit five Preserve trailheads (Gateway, Lost Dog, Sunrise, Tom’s Thumb and Brown’s Ranch) and get your passport stamped you’ll win a Preserve bandana.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Arkansas River

Flowing through four states, the Arkansas River is the sixth longest river in the United States. Its source basin and Arkansas River Canyon can be found in Colorado, where it is a popular spot to go whitewater rafting. It runs past the Rocky Mountains and drops extensively as it flows through the valley, creating the conditions that are good for rafting and kayaking. Depending on the section of the river there is everything from Class IV and V rapids to gentler II and III sections that are ideal for beginners. Waters weave scenically in and through canyons and gorges surrounded by thick forest and snow-capped peaks.Aside from boating and fishing, visitors to the Arkansas River often utilize the facilities and the beautiful backdrop for activities such as hiking, camping, mountain biking, birding, and rock climbing. There is also great fly fishing in this part of the river, particularly for trout.

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Geological Formations

Snoopy Rock

This iconic rock may be Sedona’s most famous red rock destination. Named for its uncanny resemblance to the cartoon dog, visitors can see the popular pup relaxing on his doghouse from a number of nearby viewpoints.Snoopy Rock has made travelers crack a smile since its name was first given and visitors agree you won’t even have to squint to find the massive homage Mother Nature paid to Charles Shultz. Nearby Lucy Rock, named for its resemblance to Charlie Brown’s famous friend, rounds out the Peanuts experience for travelers to this iconic Sedona spot.

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Scenic Landmarks

Desert View Drive

This scenic drive in the Canyon’s southern section is open year round and boasts scenic views, incredible landscapes and plenty of overlooks. Travelers can explore the 26 miles of highway in about an hour, while en route to the park’s east entrance. While the spectacular views are the highlight of this journey, the Desert View Watchtower and Tusayan Ruin and Museum are both worth a stop for visitors who want to explore the region’s history and Native American culture.

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Gardens & Parks

Custer State Park

With its rolling hills, roaming wildlife, and natural beauty, Custer State Park is one of the most scenic areas of South Dakota. Its clear streams, tall granite mountains, and open plains present much to see. Herds of bison, elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, and even wild turkey are frequently seen from one of the park’s walking trails or scenic drives. The Needles Highway, Wildlife Loop Road, and Iron Mountain Road are some of the most beautiful drives in the park. Five beautiful lakes and various streams provide opportunities to go fishing, kayaking, and swimming as well. After gold was discovered in the Black Hills by Lieutenant Colonel George Custer, the area quickly developed. Today it is known more for its wide open spaces and events such as the annual buffalo roundup. There is more than 71,000 acres of wild land to explore, with tunnels, forest, bridges, and viewpoints to stop at throughout.

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Gardens & Parks

Tonto National Forest

Encompassing about 3 million acres (1,214,057 hectares), the Tonto National Forest is the country’s fifth-largest forest. The altitude ranges from 1,300 to 7,900 feet (396 to 2,408 meters), allowing for diverse flora, fauna and landscapes throughout. In fact, while in one part of the forest you might find a cactus-filled desert, in another you’ll walk through rugged mountain dotted with pines. You’ll also find beautiful lake beaches for peaceful relaxation and aquatic pursuits. The main reason people visit Tonto National Forest is the outdoor recreation. There are eight wilderness areas in Tonto National Forest, including Four Peaks Wilderness, Hell's Gate Wilderness, Mazatzal Wilderness, Salome Wilderness, Fossil Creek Wild and Scenic Area, Salt River Canyon Wilderness, Sierra Ancha Wilderness and Superstition Wilderness. Each of these offers its own unique experiences.

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Bodies of Water

Cook Inlet

A watershed extending from Anchorage to the Gulf of Alaska, the Cook Inlet encompasses 180 miles (290 km) of beauty and recreation. It’s surrounded by mountains, waterfalls, glaciers and volcanoes, including the active Augustine Volcano and Mount Redoubt, linking the area with tsunamis and earthquakes in the past. The Upper Cook Inlet is also one of few places in the world that experiences a tidal bore, allowing visitors to see the unusual phenomenon of waves crashing against the current rather than with it.The Cook Inlet also holds much history, from Russian fur hunters to European explorers like Captain James Cook—after whom the site is named—visiting and mapping out the area as they tried to find the Northwest Passage in 1778. Around Upper Cook Inlet were Native Alaskans from eight different villages, with some descendants of these families still living there today.

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Gardens & Parks

Crown Point State Scenic Corridor

Driving around the bend from Portland, the first view many see of the Columbia River Gorge is from the corner of land called Crown Point. The outlook provides an overview of the dramatic scenery and surrounding canyon. On a clear day there is a panoramic view of the heavily forested area, the mountains, and the Columbia River. The point itself is an enormous rock formation that was caused by multiple lava flows, which once altered the course of the river. Looking to the west, you can see Rooster Rock, another well-loved rock formation that slopes down into the canyon. With the Vista House constructed on Crown Point at the same time the highway was being formed, it remains one of the best loved visitor stops on the historic Columbia River Gorge Highway and is considered the gateway to the area. Crown Point was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1971. It remains a popular stop for both views and refreshments.

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Gardens & Parks

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

Get up close and learn about Florida’s wildlife at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. Visitors flock here in droves to see manatees, in particular, that can be seen twisting, turning, diving and playing from the park’s underwater observatory. The park provides a safe habitat for black bears, bobcats, alligators, crocodiles and river otters, among other animals, and works to educate the public about Florida’s wildlife. There is a children’s education center on the premises to further this goal, while a specific educational program about manatees is offered three times every day.In addition to education, Homosassa is a great place for outdoor recreational activities. Bird watching is the most popular activity here, and bird walks are offered, during which guides will point out various species. Families also enjoy picnicking and taking nature walks, and if you don’t bring your lunch, that’s okay—the park has a café and concessions stand on the premises.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Mt. Waialeale

Be prepared for more colors of green than you’ve ever seen before in the area surrounding Kauai’s central Mt. Waialeale—it’s one of the wettest places on planet Earth, receiving more than 450 inches of rainfall each year. It’s dominating sheer green 5,066 cliff wall has also been called the Wall of Tears, for the many waterfalls that fill its crevices and stream down its face during frequent rains. And, if the setting looks familiar, that could be because it starred as the backdrop for opening scenes of the original 1992 Jurassic Park movie. To get to the base of Waialeale, and to the the Wailua River, you’ll have to take a 4x4 down the bumpy Wailua Forestry Management Road and then trek in. Alternatively, several helicopter tours take you much closer to its cliff face—and its waterfalls—than you could easily get to on a hike.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Mt. Hood

Located about 50 miles (81 kilometers) outside of Portland, Mt. Hood sits majestically at 11,249 feet (3,429 meters), making it the highest mountain in Oregon. As it is a dormant volcano you’ll constantly see steam rising from its fumaroles, adding to the serenity of the scene. Mt. Hood offers a range of experiences, like hiking, fishing, camping and skiing. Of Mt. Hood’s five ski lodges, the most famous is the Timberline Lodge, a designated National Historic Landmark that’s home to the only year-round ski season in North America. Additionally, there are over 1,200 miles (1,931 kilometers) of hiking trails in the Mt. Hood National Forest, with options from beginner to expert and chances to see waterfalls, lakes, woodland and wildlife. For true adventure-seekers, Mt. Hood is the second-most climbed mountain in the world with over 10,000 climbers each year, and mixes thrills with natural beauty.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Columbia River Gorge

About 16 miles east of Portland, the Columbia River Gorge stretches from Troutdale to Biggs on the Oregon side, and from Vancouver to Maryhill on the Washington side. An 80-mile canyon ranging from sea level to 4,000 feet, this National Scenic Area separates the two states in a wide, rocky and leafy ribbon which runs between the Columbia River and the Cascade Mountains.In 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition used the Columbia and its craggy banks to reach the Pacific; these days, two smoothly-paved highways on the Oregon side would greatly simplify the explorers' epic journey. Interstate-84 parallels the achingly wide, cornflower-blue Columbia, wending past dense, dark forests and jagged, lavender-grey mountains. Beside the Columbia River Highway (which runs adjacent to I-84 from Troutdale to Dodson), the Gorge is webbed with hiking trails and more than 90 waterfalls, including the 620-foot-high Multnomah Falls.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Hudson River

The Hudson River winds its way through 315-miles of scenic eastern New York State landscape, past some of the region’s best hiking trails, outdoor attractions and historical landmarks. The famous river, which runs between the shores of New Jersey and New York, is a touchstone to Native American traditions, early colonial roots and classic American artistry.Travelers looking to explore the natural beauty of this iconic east coast river can rent bikes and cruise along the newly renovated Hudson River Greenway in Manhattan. Full-day boat cruises narrated by real-life history buffs are another fun way to experience the famous river. Intrepid travelers who want to experience old-world New York can venture to Bear Mountain, where quaint camp grounds and a shallow swimming pond offer plenty of family fun, and scenic hiking trails lead to uninterrupted views of the rambling Hudson River.

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Well-known Landmarks

Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Every person with an interest in history needs to visit Mount Rushmore. Lest you think the presidential carving is simply men set in stone, there’s much more to this national memorial than what famously meets the eye. In addition to the legendary granite carvings of four American presidents, the Mount Rushmore National Memorial is an ode, treatise and patriotic lesson on America’s democracy and history.Inside the memorial’s visitor center, numerous videos and interactive displays provide a thorough overview of American history that rivals a college course. Beneath the cliff, the half-mile Presidential Walking Trail offers sweeping views of the sculpture, which is ceremoniously illuminated on every summer night. After educating yourself at the memorial’s museum and strolling the network of trails, participate in a guided ranger talk at the adjoining sculptor studio.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Matanuska Glacier

Originating within the Chugach Mountain Range, the Matanuska Glacier can enhance your Anchorage itinerary. At about 26 miles long and four miles wide, it is the largest glacier in Alaska that is accessible by vehicle. While many areas in Alaska are not known for their reliable weather, the Matanuska Glacier has an impressive ability to push warm air up, leading to a sunny, enjoyable climate. Your best bet for experiencing the glacier up close is to visit the 229-acre (93-hectare) Matanuska Glacier Park, where you’ll be able to park your car right next to the natural attraction. From there, hike onto the glacier or even go ice-climbing (guides are recommended for both), truly memorable Alaska experiences. Around the glacier and within the park are also trekking routes with viewing platforms. That being said, it’s visible from the surrounding Glenn Highway Scenic Byway, making it a popular roadside attraction.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Coconino National Forest

The towns of Flagstaff and Sedona both sit within the Coconino National Forest, a 1.9-million acre area of protected land fringed by four additional national forests. Many of the natural attractions around Flagstaff can be found within Coconino National Forest, such as the San Francisco Peaks—including the 12,600-foot Humphreys Peak—and the Sunset Crater National Monument. Visitors can find ample outdoor adventures within the forest, from fishing and swimming holes along Wet Beaver Creek to hiking and biking on red rock trails like those around Carroll Canyon.

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Gardens & Parks

Grand Teton National Park

A park that was actually established twice (the original 1929 park was formed to protect the mountain peaks and the lakes near the base; much of the adjacent valley floor was included in the boundaries established in 1950), Grand Teton Park encompasses approximately 310,000 acres of land including all 40 miles of the Teton Range and sections of the Jackson Hole Valley. Located only 10 miles south of Yellowstone National Park (it takes a little more than an hour to travel through the park from the southern boundary to Yellowstone, not including stops), Grand Teton National Park is a lesser-known but no-less spectacular neighbor to Yellowstone. Visitors to Grand Teton National Park can enjoy a myriad of activities including fishing, hiking, camping, climbing, boating on Jenny Lake, rafting the Snake River, or viewing wildlife like moose, elk, bald eagles, gray wolves, bison and black and grizzly bears.

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Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

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Museums & Exhibitions

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Nestled into the cliffs as if it simply grew there, the National Museum of Wildlife Art is 51,000 square feet of space dedicated to wildlife art. With works dating from 2500 BC to the present, the collection chronicles the history of wildlife through art. As photography is a relatively new invention, this art collection allows us to get a glimpse of wildlife—and life—in a bygone era. Though there is a definite focus on American and European art, the collection includes pieces from around the world, including New Zealand and Africa.The National Museum of Wildlife Art by the numbers:14 galleries; 5,000 items of art in various mediums including oil, bronze, stone, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, lithography, photography and charcoal; works by more than 550 artists ranging from early American Tribes to contemporary masters; a new .75 mile (1.2 km) sculpture trail by artist Walter Hood and has more than 80,000 visitors per year

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Museums & Exhibitions

Miami Children's Museum

The Miami Children's Museum is not so much a museum as a glorified playhouse, with areas for kids to practice all sorts of adult activities like banking and food shopping, caring for pets, playing TV news anchor in a studio and acting as a local cop or firefighter.Kids can pretend they’re banking at the miniature Bank of America, shopping at the local Publix Supermarket, or taking a Carnival cruise ship, which even stops in the re-created port of Brazil. One of the more impressive exhibits is the World Music Studio, where budding rock stars can lay down a few tracks and play instruments.The Miami Children’s Museum also offers educational displays about subjects ranging from Miami architecture to Brazilian culture. There are also hundreds of bilingual, interactive exhibits as well as programs, classes, and learning materials related to arts, culture, community, and communication.

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Art Galleries

Phillips Collection

The esteemed Phillips Collection houses one of the most prized collections of artwork in Washington DC. The collection features work from such renowned artists as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Vincent van Gogh, Henri Matisse, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Mark Rothko. The collection is known for its intimate feeling, as though visitors are stepping into a home, rather than a museum.Founded by Duncan Phillips and Marjorie Acker Phillips in 1921, The Phillips Collection is known for its role in bringing modern art into the mainstream in America. It is America’s first museum of modern art. It began as a small, well-curated collection of family art and has grown to include more than 3,000 works of art by American and European impressionist and modern artists. The museum hosts a variety of events every year, including special displays and exhibits. There is a coffee shop on the premises to enjoy before or after perusing the museum.

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Buildings & Structure

Watergate Complex

Designed by Italian architect Luigi Moretti in 1962, this distinctive five-building apartment and business complex beside the Potomac River was home to the political scandal that caused the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. However, as this tall, modern compound was partially funded by the Vatican, approved by the nation’s first Catholic president (John F. Kennedy), and thought to mar the city’s elegant riverfront, Watergate had been controversial for years before this scandal ever happened.In 1972, high-level officials from the Nixon administration were sent to headquarters of the Democratic National Committee –then located on the sixth floor of the Watergate Hotel and Office Building – to burglarize the office, photograph documents and tap the phones. A subsequent investigation by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of The Washington Post revealed the break-in, and in 1974, Richard Nixon was forced to step down as president.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Autry Museum of the American West

The most popular outpost of this unique educational center, the Museum of the American West, was created in 1988 by Western movie star and country recording artist Gene Autry with his friend and fellow Western actor/country singer, Monte Hale, and their wives. Located in Griffith Park just across from the Los Angeles Zoo, the museum, generally referred to as "the Autry," is dedicated to preserving and sharing the complex history and cultural significance of the 19th-century American diaspora and the subsequent boom-growth of the West.Permanent exhibitions include over 100,000 objects and artifacts from the pioneer and Gold Rush eras (including a full-scale stagecoach and saloon); depictions of the West as a fabled "land of opportunity" alongside an often grittier reality; and screenings of classic Western films, many of which star Autry and Hale themselves.

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Religious Architecture

Chicago Temple

There are plenty of stunning churches, glorious cathedrals and ornate temples throughout the world, but few offer up service with a view quite like the one located inside the Chicago Temple Building. This 23-floor building was built in 1924 and is, without a doubt, the tallest church in the world. Travelers can visit this iconic destination, which is home to the Methodist Church, and see the 1,000-seat sanctuary located on the first floor, or head to the Sky Chapel. With seating for just 30 people, this tiny but beautiful sanctuary—complete with 16 stained glass windows—is the highest indoor worship space of record.

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Buildings & Structure

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

There are 12 Federal Reserve Banks in the United States, and one of them is located in Atlanta. The Federal Reserve plays an important role in the US economy and banking system. They make sure banks are operating safely and fairly as well as establish monetary policies. Of the 12 locations throughout the country, only two have give tours. At the Atlanta location, visitors can tour the Atlanta Monetary Museum and learn about the history of money from barter to modern times. Different exhibits show the turbulent history of banking in America. There are also displays with rare coins and currency.Interactive, multimedia exhibits explain the Federal Reserve's role in the economy. Visitors will also learn how monetary policy affects daily life, how the Fed supervises and regulates banks, and how the Fed provides payments system services to help the economy run smoothly.

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Buildings & Structure

Georgia State Capitol

The focal point of the Atlanta skyline is the stately gold dome of the Georgia State Capitol. Lady Freedom, a statue holding a sword and a lantern, stands atop the Capitol building; she has captured the attention of everyone who passes by since 1889. The design of the building draws from the neoclassical style, similar to that of the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C. Inside the building, Victorian and Florentine Renaissance influence is evident in the artistic motifs, while the site has been designated a National Historic Landmark.The Capitol is the main operating building for Georgia’s state government. It houses the offices of the state governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state, and is also the site where the General Assembly gathers. The fourth floor holds an educational museum and a visitors' center.

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Sights & Landmarks

Oakland Cemetery

If graves could talk, those that fill the Oakland Cemetery would never stop. Founded in 1850, this is the oldest cemetery in Atlanta and the final resting spot for many of the individuals who built the city, as well as those who helped it grow along the way. An estimated 70,000 people are buried at Oakland, including famous Georgians Bobby Jones, Margaret Mitchell and Maynard Jackson. The last plots were sold in 1884, but incredibly, burials continue today through the use of family-owned plots and city exceptions for notable figures.The 48-acre site was built during a movement toward garden cemeteries, which has resulted in the cemetery also functioning as a beautiful park today, featuring winding stone paths, large trees and blossoming flowers. The cemetery encourages the public to visit and pay respects to those interred and to learn more about Atlanta's history.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts & Culture

What is now Uptown, Charlotte’s main business district, was historically known as Brooklyn, the centre of the city’s black community. One of Uptown’s main attractions is now the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts & Culture, an important art museum in a city that is, over 150 years after the Civil War, still divided along racial lines. Providing well-rounded insight into the black communities of both Charlotte and the South as a whole, the museum presents art exhibits, stage performances, lectures and more.Named for a prominent local architect who served as Charlotte’s first black mayor in the 1980s, the museum’s modern building features an outdoor staircase called “Jacob’s Ladder,” a powerful symbol of African-American ascent through education and enlightenment. A unique pattern of slanted lines symbolizes textile patterns used in West Africa and in quilts during the Underground Railroad era.

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Buildings & Structure

Atlanta CNN Center

The Atlanta CNN Center is the headquarters of the cable-TV news service. A visit here will give you a behind-the-scenes glance at the 24-hour news organization in high-tech action, including a visit to production areas not accessible to the general public.Your first stop at the Atlanta CNN Center is in the lobby, where you can have a videotape made of yourself while reading news stories from a CNN anchor desk. Next, you’ll learn about the history of CNN through interactive kiosks and CNN memorabilia. In the special-effects studio, see how global news is produced via modern technology. The highlight of the a visit to the Atlanta CNN Center is watching the action of the main CNN newsroom from a glass-walled observation tower. You’ll see writers composing new scripts, camera operators positioning cameras, and maybe even a live broadcast.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Museum of Discovery and Science

If you’re looking for an educational and exciting experience in Fort Lauderdale, visit the fascinating Museum of Discovery and Science. You can see sharks and marvel that the largest captive living Atlantic coral reef. The museum’s animals include bats, 12-foot snakes, alligators, turtles, and iguanas.You can also learn about Florida’s Everglades in an interactive cockpit simulator exhibit or discover Mars in the space exhibit, Runways to Rockets. The museum also contains a visually stunning IMAX theatre, which is the largest in Florida. Go on a cinematic journey complete with 15,000 watts of surround sound.

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Religious Architecture

Chapel of the Transfiguration

Western Wyoming, with its windswept plains, jagged mountains, and refreshing, airy solitude, exudes a classical romance that’s lost on the developed, urban US. It should only make sense then that this rustic church built in 1925, with a glass window behind the pulpit that frames the snowcapped Tetons, is one of the most scenic and popular places to get married in all of Wyoming. Here at the Chapel of the Transfiguration in Grand Teton National Park, loved ones gather to exchange blessings and vows amidst the golden plains, and ring the bell, cast in 1842, that still hangs from the ranch style bowery. Though weddings here are most popular in summer, from May through the end of September, the church is open every day of the year—provided the door isn’t blocked by snow from a recent winter snowstorm. While the church was built as a place for worship for early Wyoming pioneers, today it’ a classic photographer’s favorite inside of the National Park.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Margaret Mitchell House

When Margaret Mitchell wrote her epic, Pulitzer Prize-winning, romantic novel, Gone With the Wind, she didn't do it from a desk at a picturesque country cottage or a sprawling Victorian-era mansion. Instead, she wrote the novel that would be turned into one of the greatest movies ever made from a tiny apartment on the first floor of what was then known as the Crescent Apartments. The Tudor Revival-style home with red brick and white trim served as Mitchell's home from 1925 until 1932 and is today listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The site is known as the Margaret Mitchell House and Museum.Here visitors learn about Mitchell's life in Atlanta as well as fun facts surrounding her writing of the novel. An adjacent building houses a "Making of the Movie" museum, to which entrance is included with the price of admission.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Woodrow Wilson House

The retirement home for President Woodrow Wilson his wife Edith, this Georgian Revival house on Embassy Row earned its National Historic Preservation Site status for both its inhabitants and its architect. It was designed in 1915 by Waddy Butler Wood, the man behind a slew of D.C.’s finest private homes, as well the Masonic Temple, National Museum of Women in the Arts, and headquarters of the Department of the Interior.Washington’s only presidential museum, the home has been maintained much as it looked at the time of Wilson’s death here in 1924; Edith continued to live in the house until her own death in 1961. In addition to an 8000-volume library and a slew of personal artifacts and memorabilia, Woodrow Wilson House features an elevator installed to accommodate the former president, who had suffered a semi-paralyzing stroke in 1919.

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Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

Top Activities

Tickets & Passes

Night Tours

Self-guided Tours

Top Attractions

Sights & Landmarks

Downtown Tunnels

The signature weather of Houston is something to write home about – it’s hot. Really hot in the summer, and as Houston is a do-something city, the powers that be decided to do something about it – they built the Houston Downtown Tunnels. A series of interconnected and, bless them, air-conditioned tunnels running 20 feet below the surface of the street, the Downtown Tunnels connect restaurants, shops and office buildings and provide some much-needed respite from the Houston heat. A feat of engineering that connects 95 city blocks, the tunnels themselves are an attraction for the Houston visitor. While you might expect a city of two million people to offer a downtown scene full of bustling people, you may find Houston’s streets oddly deserted – but that’s just because the real life of the downtown scene is happening underground. See it for yourself, and enjoy one of the most unique attractions in the entire southwest.

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Geological Formations

Hana Lava Tube (Ka'eleku Caverns)

Also known as the Hana Lava Tube, these subterranean caverns were created when lava once cooled on the surface here but continued to flow underneath the ground above. Now there are hundreds of unique rock formations throughout the half mile long cavern system, including stalagmites and stalactites. The caverns are the largest accessible lava tubes on Maui. It is estimated that the caves were formed nearly 30,000 years ago, and legend would tell us they are the work of Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire.Water drips from the ceilings of the caves, but bats and insects are noticeably absent from the environment. Much of the caverns look as though they’ve been coated in chocolate. It’s an underground landscape that feels almost otherworldly, waiting to be explored. Above ground, there is a unique red Ti botanical garden maze that is also easy to get lost in.

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Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

Top Activities

Night Tours

4WD Tours

Nature and Wildlife Tours

Extreme Sports

Fishing Charters

Helicopter Tours

Top Attractions

Places of Natural Beauty

Duke Kahanamoku Beach

Named after Hawaii’s legendary surfer and the official “Ambassador of Aloha,” this Waikiki Beach was voted “Best Beach in America” in the 2014 rankings. Dozens of palm trees spring from the sand to provide natural shade from the sun, and young children love splashing and lounging in the protected saltwater lagoon. The ocean here isn’t nearly as busy as at the main Waikiki Beach, and since the offshore reef manages to break up the waves, inflatable rafts meant for lounging in the sun replace surfboards, SUP boards, and canoes. When standing on the wide, white sand beach, iconic Diamond Head looms to the left on the far side of Waikiki. To the right, the Ala Wai Boat Harbor houses mariners from all across the Pacific, and the famous Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort lines the entire shoreline. The beach—as you can imagine—is very popular, so it’s a good idea to arrive early and stake out a good patch of sand.

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Geological Formations

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

Monument Valley is a land of contrast. With orange sands set against a cerulean blue sky, and the magnificent red-rock buttes jutting out of the earth, the sight is other worldly.Monument Valley is a part of the Colorado Plateau. It's made up of red sandstone buttes that tower up to 1,000 feet (304 meters) above the ground. Stretching from the Arizona to Utah desert, the area is composed of basins, strange rock formations, cactus, and the bright desert sands.There are plenty of hikes, horse trails, valley, and hills to climb in the area. The most popular destination is the Four Corners Monument, where you can gaze at the border of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

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Land Activities & Tours

Corona Arch

Visitors agree that the Corona Arch is one of Red Rock Country’s most spectacular sites. With its swoop of natural sandstone that stretches up towards a thrilling mountain pass, Corona Arch proves a highlight for travelers to the Moab area. The technical trail, which scales smooth rock walls and requires a ladder and cable to ascend, is a difficult but doable adventure that grants visitors epic views and a hard-earned sense of accomplishment. More adventurous travelers and daredevil outdoorsmen can repel from the top of Corona Arch in what can only be described as a serious natural rush. But a visit to this popular destination is still worthwhile for the faint of heart who prefer to take in beautiful views of the arch from the ground up.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Ko Olina

Although it is often referred to as a resort, Ko Olina doesn’t describe a property in particular. It is, in fact, a master-planned vacation and residential community containing several upscale resorts, like the Aulani Disney Resort & Spa, the JW Marriott Ihilani Resort & Spa and Marriott's Ko Olina Beach Club. The area is famous for its pristine, man-made beach coves (the sand was imported from Lanai!) that are very popular with swimmers. Their creation was more a necessity than a caprice, as the ocean tends to be quite turbulent in these parts; the rock levies encase the lagoons for safer sea ventures.The destination is famous for its unparalleled golfing opportunities, including the LPGA Lotte Championship (women's professional golf tournament on the LPGA Tour).

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Geological Formations

Hualalai Volcano

Hualalai is massive, and yet it’s unknown. For all of its size and volcanic grandeur—gradually rising behind the town of Kona and fading into the clouds—this dormant volcano is shrouded in obscurity by its famous, more active neighbors.At 8,200 feet in height, Hualalai isn’t nearly as high as Mauna Loa, and having last erupted in 1801, it isn’t considered nearly as active as the currently erupting Kilauea. Nevertheless, Hualalai remains an active volcano just miles from populous Kona, and experts feel that this sleeping volcano is on the brink of waking up. It’s believed that Hualalai will erupt again within the next 100 years, potentially adding more black lava rock to Kona’s volcanic landscape. As the volcano sleeps, however, coffee farms continue to dominate its flanks and resorts now dot its shoreline.

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Scenic Landmarks

Loop Road

Loop Road is a scenic one-lane road that provides a two-hour detour from the Tamiami Trail, taking travelers through picturesque cypress marshes along a primitive road. This 25-mile stretch through Big Cypress National Preserve is rich with history and wildlife and folklore, a sort of Wild West of Florida for those who eschewed civilization well into the 1950s and 60s. Fact: Al Capone had a hunting lodge here during the Depression.The eastern end of Loop Road is paved, with the pavement ending at the Loop Road Environmental Education, run by the National Park, where you can walk the Tree Snail Hammock Nature Trail or stop for a picnic. After this point, the road turns into gravel, but it has been recently upgraded, making it easier on cars than it has been in the past. There are several hikes on the Loop in addition to the Tree Snail Hammock Trail for folks wanting to stretch their legs, as well as a few campsites.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Ko?olau Range

Stretching from just behind Honolulu to Oahu’s Windward (eastern) coastline, the Ko’olau Range is not actually a mountain range at all. Instead, the undulating green and vertical slopes which top out at 3,100 feet, are just one side the ancient, massive Ko’olau shield volcano. The other half of the volcano collapsed into the ocean millennia ago. The Ko’olau Range acts as a wind block for points inland, stopping clouds along the coast and causing regular rains. But here, rain is a good thing: Residents and locals delight as the Ko’olau’s creased face fills with hundreds of thin white waterfalls and Hawaii’s iconic rainbows arch across the sky.The best places to experience the grandeur of the Ko’olau Range are themselves elevated. The Pali Road, connecting Kailua to downtown Honolulu, winds up, into and, in some instances, through, the Ko’olaus via tunnels bored directly into the cliff face. Be sure to stop and take in the view from several scenic stop-offs along the way.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Kapalua

Situated on Maui’s northern tip past the sweltering shores of Lahaina, Kapalua is a luxurious enclave of beaches, golf, tennis and resorts. The signature beach—Kapalua Bay—has been voted America’s best, and the Plantation Golf Course regularly hosts the best in professional golf. Snorkel with sea turtles and colorful reef fish at hidden Namalu Bay, or hike the Village Walking Trails that climb their way up the ridge. Wherever you stand in Kapalua, the island of Moloka’i dramatically sits on the not-too-distant horizon, and whitecaps fleck the Pailolo Channel that separates the two islands. In winter, locals flock to Fleming Beach Park for the bodysurfing and waves, and secret, white sand Oneloa Bay is a sanctuary of footprints and silence. And, even though tony Kapalua is only 20 minutes from Lahaina, its exposure to the trade winds means it’s always cooler just a few minutes up the road.

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Scenic Landmarks

Calico Hills

When it’s time to escape the neon and hustle of the jam-packed Las Vegas strip, the Calico Hills are the perfect location for swapping the smoke-filled gaming room parlors for a breath of fresh mountain air. Set 30 minutes west of downtown Las Vegas, the Calico Hills offer hiking and rock climbing through a dreamy sandstone landscape, where red-hued rock piles form a network of spires and summits for visitors to explore. Located inside of Red Rock Canyon, the Calico Hills are best known for the popular Calico Hills Trail, which begins just after the Visitor Center and runs 3.2 miles to Sandstone Quarry along the base of the hills. For many visitors the thrill of the hike is scrambling up on the rocks, choosing well worn side trails to navigate the boulders and get views of the Las Vegas desert. At an elevation near 4,000 feet the air is refreshingly cool, though summer temperatures can still be perilous if hiking or climbing midday.

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Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

Top Activities

Tickets & Passes

Honeymoon Packages

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Top Attractions

Places of Natural Beauty

Bainbridge Island

A half-hour’s ferry ride from downtown Seattle, Bainbridge Island is a relaxing side trip in Puget Sound. The quaint downtown area stretches just a few blocks from the ferry terminal down Winslow Avenue, which is lined with art and antique shops, clothing boutiques, and cafés and restaurants, many of which focus on using regionally-sourced ingredients in their farm-to-table cuisine. Aside from the small commercial district, the majority of the island is residential or rural, dotted with small bed and breakfasts and even a few vineyards. The main draw of visiting, other than simply rest and relaxation, is the outdoor activities. Hiking and biking are popular, with miles of trails traversing the rolling hills. Other activities popular with locals and visitors include kayaking, whale-watching, and viewing other wildlife like deer and bald eagles. Kayak and bike rentals are both available year round as temperatures are fairly mild any time of year.

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Fun & Games

Downtown Container Park

This collection of boutique shops with unique goods was formed from leftover shipping containers. The open air shopping spot is centered around a courtyard, which has a playground for children (with a treehouse!) and a stage with frequent live entertainment and events. Dining options range from high-end restaurants to gourmet hot dog stands and a craft whiskey bar. There are even art galleries to peruse and often concerts and films. Specialty shops vary from boutique clothing stores to home decor and smaller local goods. The emphasis is on supporting one-of-a-kind products from local Las Vegas businesses and items that cannot be found elsewhere. There are also interesting artistic designs and exhibits throughout, making this a fascinating place to explore with something for everyone.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Wrigley Mansion

Designed as a 50th anniversary present for his wife, the Wrigley Mansion was constructed in 1932 by enterprising gum salesman William Wrigley Jr.The mansion sits atop a hill, providing scenic views of the mountains and Phoenix landscape below. The Wrigley family sold the property in the early 1970s. After changing ownership several times, it looked as though the mansion was going to be demolished in 1992, until the Hormel family purchased the Mansion and restored it with the intention of sharing it with the public. The on-site restaurant is a popular spot to grab a bite to eat or celebrate a special occasion.Guided tours of the Wrigley Mansion provide details about its history and fun tidbits like ghost stories that have been told over the years. Some tours include lunch at the Wrigley Mansion as well.

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Fun & Games

LA Fashion District

Los Angeles is one of the cities closely tied to the fashion world, and although the area in the city known as the Fashion District is largely catering to the industry it's also a tourist attraction that's partly open to the public. LA's Fashion District is a hive of design activity – more than 100 blocks where fabric makers and wholesale clothing distributors occupying huge warehouses. These places don't sell to the general public, but there are some retail businesses in the neighborhood – and even some that are typically only open to the industry have special sale days once each month during which they sell off samples. Inside the boundaries of the Fashion District are two popular tourist areas. The Los Angeles Flower District, where you'll find hundreds of wholesale flower shops (even if you're not shopping, it's gorgeous scenery); and Santee Alley, a bustling pedestrian street lined with shops that's known for its bargains.

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Land Activities & Tours

Paramount Pictures Studio

This graceful symbol of the movie industry's Golden Age, open for business since 1926, is the only major film studio still operating in Hollywood's commercial district. The sprawling 65-acre lot features huge iron-scrollwork gates and Spanish-style architecture, as well as realistic replicas of vintage city streets.Paramount was created in 1912 by movie theater owner Adolph Zukor, who took a stylistic departure from the era's short nickelodeon films of that time, which were popular with working class immigrants, and produced long-form film versions of stage plays in the hopes of engaging America's middle class. Zukor's plan worked and Paramount eventually launched brilliant careers for long-form movie stars like Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson, director Cecil B. DeMille, Marlene Dietrich, Mae West, the Marx Brothers, Bob Hope and many more.

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Fun & Games

Carytown

Spend an afternoon shopping and people watching around the hip and vibrant Carytown neighborhood in west Richmond. The nine-block shopping area sits just south of the Museum District, only a couple blocks from the Museum of Fine Arts. Carytown boasts more the 250 shops, with everything from big name clothing stores to local boutiques and craft shops. You’ll find dozens of restaurants, cafés and bakeries, so there are plenty of choices when it’s time for a lunch break. Carytown is also home to the Byrd Theatre, a national historic landmark that is still in daily operation. Stop in to catch second-run movies for only $2.

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Fun & Games

Old Town Scottsdale

The city of Scottsdale sits adjacent to Phoenix, attracting visitors by the bus-load to Scottsdale Old Town. This older section of town is also its main cultural hub, thronged with dining, drinking, shopping and nightlife options. Native American crafts, jewelry and artworks are sold in this downtown arts district, and galleries and outdoor sculptures add to the cultural feel. It’s also where you’ll find museums like Scottsdale’s Museum of Contemporary Art and the city’s historical museum. Walking tours highlight the old town’s Old West character, with hitching posts from the days when horses were ridden through town and quaint stores selling Western gear.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Dutton Family Theater

The Dutton Family Theater is home to nightly shows featuring three generation of Dutton family performers. As finalists in the popular television show America’s Got Talent, they showcased their musical talents on stage ranging from rock and roll to Opera to Country and Bluegrass. Consisting of the mother, father, and seven children, combined the family has over 31 years of gracing the stage. Multitalented family members play instruments ranging from harmonica and fiddle to violin, piano, bass, cello, banjo, keyboard and drums. Family members have frequently won international competitions for their musical talents.It was after touring the globe that the Dutton Family began to put on on this entertaining show, and it has been received with rave reviews. Together the family members bring a level of professionalism, talent, and camaraderie to the stage. Their two-hour shows feature a variety of music, dance, and comedy with a masterful range that suits the entire family.

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Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

Top Activities

Street Food Tours

Top Attractions

Restaurant

Jacques Torres Chocolate

Set in a converted brick warehouse in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, this chocolate wonderland is the flagship of Jacques Torres’ mini-empire of treats. An Algerian-born French pâtissier whose resume includes New York’s famed Le Cirque, Torres not only makes his own dark- and milk-chocolates, he bakes his own croissants – which you can enjoy here at one of two highly coveted café tables. Often referred to as “Mr. Chocolate,” Torres was of the first chocolatiers to use graphic prints on his confections, as well as unique flavors and ingredients like ancho chile and passion fruit. He creates Champagne-filled chocolate corks, menageries of chocolate animals, and his own signature chocolate lollipops, in addition to ice cream, cookies, and an enormous chocolate bar called the Big Daddy. His popularity has allowed him to open five other locations in Manhattan, including an outpost in Chelsea Market.

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Winery

Blenheim Vineyards

Along the Monticello Wine Trail, which parallels the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains in Virgina, Blenheim Vineyards is an historic estate that is today home to a small winery owned and built by the singer Dave Matthews. In the 1700s, the property was the residence of John Carter, Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, and the estate still features historic 18th and 19th century buildings, including a school-chapel and a library. The winery building itself, however, was built in 2000 using environmentally friendly practices, with the tasting room where glass panels offer a view into the production area below.

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Market

Liberty Station

As a major port and hub of the U.S. Navy, it’s no surprise that one of the city’s most important commercial districts is a former naval base. Once a military barracks and training center, Liberty Station is a cultural hub with a celebrated food market. The many food stalls, small shops, and even art galleries bring together some of the best of each in San Diego and represent the city’s diverse influences. The Liberty Public Market is a food hall comprised of artisan food, beer, wine, cocktails, and the city’s top local flavors. Spread out over 28 acres, the Liberty Station architecture showcases San Diego’s historically Spanish roots. Many of the historic buildings have been tastefully converted into modern businesses and venues, many stretching along its main promenade. It’s also a major arts district, home to museums, dance companies, music halls, and a popular monthly art walk.

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Cafe

Cafe Wha?

Located at 115 MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village, Cafe Wha? is a historic bar known for being the career birthplace of many well-known musicians and comedians. Open since the 1950s, some artists who consider Cafe Wha? a home include Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Bruce Springsteen, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, Bill Crosby and Peter, Paul & Mary, to name a few. Although it’s gone through many changes over the years, you can expect high energy music in an informal atmosphere every night of the week. In 1987, the Cafe Wha? House Band was employed, and are now known throughout the world and regularly feature celebrity guest performers. You can hear them live Wednesday through Sunday, playing everything from Motown to Reggae to Alternative Rock and more. On Monday nights you’ll hear Brazooka, a Brazilian dance band incorporating elements of Jazz and Samba, while Tuesdays are a mix of soul, R&B and Funk with Disfunktion.

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Restaurant

Pioneer Saloon

The town of Goodsprings—once the largest town in Nevada is a shadow of its former self, but its central watering hole remains little changed. The still-operating century-old Pioneer Saloon sits on a dusty strip near the Goodsprings General Store, another still-functioning relic from the town’s gold rush heyday. The tin exterior and cherry wood interior of the Pioneer Saloon have stood the test of time, and added artifacts detail its storied history. In the billiards/dining room, walls are lined with newspaper clippings of bar patrons – including, famously, Clark Gable who spent two days sidled up to the bar awaiting word of his wife’s fate following a plane crash. Eager patrons regularly drive the 33 miles from Las Vegas to enjoy a beer with a ‘ghost burger,’ or ‘ghost tacos,’ and karaoke. And, for those brave enough, the Saloon offers after-hours lock-ins for encounters with their ghost hunting equipment.

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Restaurant

Bauhaus Brew Labs

With deliciously locally-crafted brews, Bauhaus Brew Labs seeks to produce the highest in quality craft lagers. With three distinctly flavored, German-inspired lagers and one IPA, the brewhouse additionally makes five seasonal varieties. The Brew Labs take an interesting creative approach to making beer as inspired by the post WWI Bauhaus School of art and design in Germany. They continue the tradition of creativity and experimentation that was founded there, with an emphasis on flavor and love of beer. The company purports that life, work, and play should intersect, with this philosophy embedded into their process of making their beer. The Brew Labs outdoor patio is dog-friendly and comfortable to relax on. The brewery invites beer enthusiasts to taste their imaginative interpretations of classic brews, and events often accompany tastings. The tasting room is inspired by the communal beer halls of Germany and is consistently regarded as one of the best in Minnesota.

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United States

25 Featured Attractions

Places of Natural Beauty

Russian River

California's Russian River is one of the largest in the San Francisco Bay Area, starting in Mendocino County and cutting through Sonoma County on its way to the ocean.The entire Russian River runs more than 110 miles from its source to the Pacific Ocean, and much of the area is popular as a tourist destination. Towns like Healdsburg, Cloverdale, Santa Rosa, Geyserville, Sebastopol, Jenner and Bodega Bay are all draws for outdoor recreation, fine dining and winery visits. The river itself is great for canoeing, swimming, and fishing from spring through fall. In the beautiful countryside on either side of the river you can go horseback riding, hiking, camping or golfing. The Russian River Valley is famous for its wineries, known for its Chardonnay and Pinot Noir – and that thriving wine culture brings with it a thriving food culture. You can take wine tasting tours in the area, and cap them off with excellent meals in nearly any town throughout the Russian River Valley.

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Sights & Landmarks

San Francisco Japantown

San Francisco’s Japantown may cover a small area, but it is big on authentic Japanese culture. It’s one of only three Japantowns remaining in the United States, and San Francisco’s is the country’s oldest and largest. From architecture and shopping to events and cuisine, a walk through Japantown truly feels as if you’ve been transported to Japan. Strolling through the neighborhood it’s hard to miss the five-storied Peace Pagoda, which was a gift from San Francisco’s sister city Osaka. It’s at the heart of the Peace Plaza, where it is easy to discover unique pieces of Japanese culture. There are a number of authentic shops and restaurants — many of which are located in the Japan Center, a large indoor shopping mall. Taste a number of different Japanese foods, or pick up ingredients from a Japanese grocer. The sights, sounds, and smells of Japantown are a rare chance to experience Japan outside of the country itself.

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Gardens & Parks

New York City Riverside Park

A four-mile strip of elegant public green space between the Hudson River and Riverside Drive on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, this designated scenic landmark was first proposed in 1865, laid out in 1910 (using designs by Frederick Law Olmstead), re-designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses (who incorporated an underground train tunnel still in use by Amtrak), and enlarged by Donald Trump in the 1990s. In addition to purely scenic paths landscaped with trees, flowers, terraces and bridges, the park includes a wide variety of recreational options, like baseball diamonds, basketball, tennis and handball courts, skate ramps, kayak and canoe launch sites, playgrounds, and fitness paths. As part of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, the park contains car-free bike routes, and its 110-slip public marina at 79th Street is part of New York State’s Water Trail. There are several graceful monuments within the park, including Grant’s Tomb, at West 122nd Street.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Duke Kahanamoku Beach

Named after Hawaii’s legendary surfer and the official “Ambassador of Aloha,” this Waikiki Beach was voted “Best Beach in America” in the 2014 rankings. Dozens of palm trees spring from the sand to provide natural shade from the sun, and young children love splashing and lounging in the protected saltwater lagoon. The ocean here isn’t nearly as busy as at the main Waikiki Beach, and since the offshore reef manages to break up the waves, inflatable rafts meant for lounging in the sun replace surfboards, SUP boards, and canoes. When standing on the wide, white sand beach, iconic Diamond Head looms to the left on the far side of Waikiki. To the right, the Ala Wai Boat Harbor houses mariners from all across the Pacific, and the famous Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort lines the entire shoreline. The beach—as you can imagine—is very popular, so it’s a good idea to arrive early and stake out a good patch of sand.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Bainbridge Island

A half-hour’s ferry ride from downtown Seattle, Bainbridge Island is a relaxing side trip in Puget Sound. The quaint downtown area stretches just a few blocks from the ferry terminal down Winslow Avenue, which is lined with art and antique shops, clothing boutiques, and cafés and restaurants, many of which focus on using regionally-sourced ingredients in their farm-to-table cuisine. Aside from the small commercial district, the majority of the island is residential or rural, dotted with small bed and breakfasts and even a few vineyards. The main draw of visiting, other than simply rest and relaxation, is the outdoor activities. Hiking and biking are popular, with miles of trails traversing the rolling hills. Other activities popular with locals and visitors include kayaking, whale-watching, and viewing other wildlife like deer and bald eagles. Kayak and bike rentals are both available year round as temperatures are fairly mild any time of year.

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Museums & Exhibitions

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Nestled into the cliffs as if it simply grew there, the National Museum of Wildlife Art is 51,000 square feet of space dedicated to wildlife art. With works dating from 2500 BC to the present, the collection chronicles the history of wildlife through art. As photography is a relatively new invention, this art collection allows us to get a glimpse of wildlife—and life—in a bygone era. Though there is a definite focus on American and European art, the collection includes pieces from around the world, including New Zealand and Africa.The National Museum of Wildlife Art by the numbers:14 galleries; 5,000 items of art in various mediums including oil, bronze, stone, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, lithography, photography and charcoal; works by more than 550 artists ranging from early American Tribes to contemporary masters; a new .75 mile (1.2 km) sculpture trail by artist Walter Hood and has more than 80,000 visitors per year

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Geological Formations

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

Monument Valley is a land of contrast. With orange sands set against a cerulean blue sky, and the magnificent red-rock buttes jutting out of the earth, the sight is other worldly.Monument Valley is a part of the Colorado Plateau. It's made up of red sandstone buttes that tower up to 1,000 feet (304 meters) above the ground. Stretching from the Arizona to Utah desert, the area is composed of basins, strange rock formations, cactus, and the bright desert sands.There are plenty of hikes, horse trails, valley, and hills to climb in the area. The most popular destination is the Four Corners Monument, where you can gaze at the border of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

Learn More

Fun & Games

Downtown Container Park

This collection of boutique shops with unique goods was formed from leftover shipping containers. The open air shopping spot is centered around a courtyard, which has a playground for children (with a treehouse!) and a stage with frequent live entertainment and events. Dining options range from high-end restaurants to gourmet hot dog stands and a craft whiskey bar. There are even art galleries to peruse and often concerts and films. Specialty shops vary from boutique clothing stores to home decor and smaller local goods. The emphasis is on supporting one-of-a-kind products from local Las Vegas businesses and items that cannot be found elsewhere. There are also interesting artistic designs and exhibits throughout, making this a fascinating place to explore with something for everyone.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Wrigley Mansion

Designed as a 50th anniversary present for his wife, the Wrigley Mansion was constructed in 1932 by enterprising gum salesman William Wrigley Jr.The mansion sits atop a hill, providing scenic views of the mountains and Phoenix landscape below. The Wrigley family sold the property in the early 1970s. After changing ownership several times, it looked as though the mansion was going to be demolished in 1992, until the Hormel family purchased the Mansion and restored it with the intention of sharing it with the public. The on-site restaurant is a popular spot to grab a bite to eat or celebrate a special occasion.Guided tours of the Wrigley Mansion provide details about its history and fun tidbits like ghost stories that have been told over the years. Some tours include lunch at the Wrigley Mansion as well.

Learn More

Fun & Games

LA Fashion District

Los Angeles is one of the cities closely tied to the fashion world, and although the area in the city known as the Fashion District is largely catering to the industry it's also a tourist attraction that's partly open to the public. LA's Fashion District is a hive of design activity – more than 100 blocks where fabric makers and wholesale clothing distributors occupying huge warehouses. These places don't sell to the general public, but there are some retail businesses in the neighborhood – and even some that are typically only open to the industry have special sale days once each month during which they sell off samples. Inside the boundaries of the Fashion District are two popular tourist areas. The Los Angeles Flower District, where you'll find hundreds of wholesale flower shops (even if you're not shopping, it's gorgeous scenery); and Santee Alley, a bustling pedestrian street lined with shops that's known for its bargains.

Learn More

Restaurant

Jacques Torres Chocolate

Set in a converted brick warehouse in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, this chocolate wonderland is the flagship of Jacques Torres’ mini-empire of treats. An Algerian-born French pâtissier whose resume includes New York’s famed Le Cirque, Torres not only makes his own dark- and milk-chocolates, he bakes his own croissants – which you can enjoy here at one of two highly coveted café tables. Often referred to as “Mr. Chocolate,” Torres was of the first chocolatiers to use graphic prints on his confections, as well as unique flavors and ingredients like ancho chile and passion fruit. He creates Champagne-filled chocolate corks, menageries of chocolate animals, and his own signature chocolate lollipops, in addition to ice cream, cookies, and an enormous chocolate bar called the Big Daddy. His popularity has allowed him to open five other locations in Manhattan, including an outpost in Chelsea Market.

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Winery

Blenheim Vineyards

Along the Monticello Wine Trail, which parallels the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains in Virgina, Blenheim Vineyards is an historic estate that is today home to a small winery owned and built by the singer Dave Matthews. In the 1700s, the property was the residence of John Carter, Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, and the estate still features historic 18th and 19th century buildings, including a school-chapel and a library. The winery building itself, however, was built in 2000 using environmentally friendly practices, with the tasting room where glass panels offer a view into the production area below.

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Market

Liberty Station

As a major port and hub of the U.S. Navy, it’s no surprise that one of the city’s most important commercial districts is a former naval base. Once a military barracks and training center, Liberty Station is a cultural hub with a celebrated food market. The many food stalls, small shops, and even art galleries bring together some of the best of each in San Diego and represent the city’s diverse influences. The Liberty Public Market is a food hall comprised of artisan food, beer, wine, cocktails, and the city’s top local flavors. Spread out over 28 acres, the Liberty Station architecture showcases San Diego’s historically Spanish roots. Many of the historic buildings have been tastefully converted into modern businesses and venues, many stretching along its main promenade. It’s also a major arts district, home to museums, dance companies, music halls, and a popular monthly art walk.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Mirror Lake

Located in Yosemite Valley, Mirror Lake is famous for its reflections of Half Dome and Mount Watkins when the water level is high enough; to be fair, it's more of a pond than a lake. But it's a pretty pond that can be accessed by an easy two-mile round trip stroll from the valley floor.If photographs are what you're looking to capture, be sure to visit in the spring and early summer; birders will enjoy catching glimpses of white-headed woodpeckers and martens. If you’d prefer a circumferential view of the lake, there’s a five-mile (eight kilometer) loop hike that is sure to satisfy.

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Casinos

Dig This Las Vegas

Who says kids get to have all of the fun? This larger-than-life sandbox is the perfect place for adults to get back to their youth and experience the thrill of operating massive machinery in a model construction site.After brief safety instructions, travelers choose from a variety of bulldozers or excavators and hop behind the wheel, where a professional guide offers a brief orientation before the earth really starts to move. Learn to dig the ground below, play a round of “Excavator Basketball” or ride a “Bulldozer Teeter-Totter”. This one-of-a-kind experience is one of the best ways to feel like a kid again—even on a trip to Sin City!

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Places of Natural Beauty

Pismo Beach

Located half way between San Francisco and Los Angeles, Pismo Beach is a classic California beach town. With more than 20 miles of wide sandy beaches, there are plenty of places to play or get comfortable for a nice afternoon nap. From surfing and swimming, to kayaking and fishing, the surf provides plenty of ways to fill your day. Water temperatures range from the low to upper 50s (Fahrenheit degrees), so bring your wetsuit or plan on renting one when you arrive, if getting wet is in your future. The biggest of a string of coastal towns in Central California, Pismo Beach is relaxed, with small-town charm. Its location makes exploring along the coast easy. Ride ATVs or take a Hummer tour in the Oceano Sand Dunes, go tidepooling in Cayucos, or visit the Central Coast Aquarium in Avila. Moderate weather makes most outdoor activities possible all year round.

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Gardens & Parks

Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum

Created on the site of what was once a miniature golf course, the Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum is now home to more than 500 palms and cycads, representing more than 150 different species from around the world. Starting with just 60 palms representing 10 different species, the two-acre park has continuously expanded since its 1977 dedication. From massive specimens that are too big to fit in private yards to popular types that can be found along Florida’s beaches, the Palm Arboretum is an ever-changing, never-ending project that grows and expands organically. Take the time to stroll down the pathways, learning about the specimens, or simply perch on one of the conversation benches and enjoy the peace of the palms.

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Land Activities & Tours

Hell's Revenge Trail

With its steep climbs and deep descents, the Hell’s Revenge Trail offers some of the best views of the Colorado River, La Sal Mountains, Negro Bill Canyon, and the Abyss Canyon. At nearly 7.5 miles long, the challenging trail loops through the sandstone and slickrock of the scenic Moab Valley. It takes those brave enough to walk its roller coaster track through narrow canyons, Navajo sandstone formations, and vast pools of water. Views are often exceptional.Steep hills and tight turns keep visitors to this trail on edge (literally). Names of spots such as Devil’s Driveway, Hell’s Gate, the Tip Over Challenge, and the Escalator, this trail is not for the faint of heart — but those adventurous enough to take it on will be rewarded with sweeping views of the surrounding natural scenery.

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Gardens & Parks

Sunken Gardens

Sunken Gardens is a four-acre botanical garden located in the heart of St. Petersburg, Florida. At more than 100 years old, it’s recognized as St. Petersburg’s oldest living museum and is home to over 50,000 tropical plants, representing more than 500 species, along with flamingos and other exotic birds.Look for various areas like a Japanese garden, cactus garden, butterfly garden, and the Chilean flamingo garden. Stop at scenic points like the Wishing Well, Photo Ring, waterfall, and the Wedding Lawn. Don’t miss the Growing Stone, a fossilized limestone rock has a sign that says: “Legend has it that ‘he who sits upon the ancient stone shall be granted tranquility, inner harmony and the talent to make things grow.’” Sadly, the flamingo population at Sunken Gardens has dwindled. There is a non-profit fundraising campaign currently underway to raise money in order to bring 20 more flamingos to Sunken Gardens.

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Sights & Landmarks

Downtown Tunnels

The signature weather of Houston is something to write home about – it’s hot. Really hot in the summer, and as Houston is a do-something city, the powers that be decided to do something about it – they built the Houston Downtown Tunnels. A series of interconnected and, bless them, air-conditioned tunnels running 20 feet below the surface of the street, the Downtown Tunnels connect restaurants, shops and office buildings and provide some much-needed respite from the Houston heat. A feat of engineering that connects 95 city blocks, the tunnels themselves are an attraction for the Houston visitor. While you might expect a city of two million people to offer a downtown scene full of bustling people, you may find Houston’s streets oddly deserted – but that’s just because the real life of the downtown scene is happening underground. See it for yourself, and enjoy one of the most unique attractions in the entire southwest.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Miami Children's Museum

The Miami Children's Museum is not so much a museum as a glorified playhouse, with areas for kids to practice all sorts of adult activities like banking and food shopping, caring for pets, playing TV news anchor in a studio and acting as a local cop or firefighter.Kids can pretend they’re banking at the miniature Bank of America, shopping at the local Publix Supermarket, or taking a Carnival cruise ship, which even stops in the re-created port of Brazil. One of the more impressive exhibits is the World Music Studio, where budding rock stars can lay down a few tracks and play instruments.The Miami Children’s Museum also offers educational displays about subjects ranging from Miami architecture to Brazilian culture. There are also hundreds of bilingual, interactive exhibits as well as programs, classes, and learning materials related to arts, culture, community, and communication.

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Art Galleries

Phillips Collection

The esteemed Phillips Collection houses one of the most prized collections of artwork in Washington DC. The collection features work from such renowned artists as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Vincent van Gogh, Henri Matisse, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Mark Rothko. The collection is known for its intimate feeling, as though visitors are stepping into a home, rather than a museum.Founded by Duncan Phillips and Marjorie Acker Phillips in 1921, The Phillips Collection is known for its role in bringing modern art into the mainstream in America. It is America’s first museum of modern art. It began as a small, well-curated collection of family art and has grown to include more than 3,000 works of art by American and European impressionist and modern artists. The museum hosts a variety of events every year, including special displays and exhibits. There is a coffee shop on the premises to enjoy before or after perusing the museum.

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Sights & Landmarks

Winter Park

Fun fact: four presidents have visited Winter Park, Florida, including Barack Obama in 2012. With those notable stop-ins, this former resort town exudes charm and encourages relaxation even today. The suburban city in Orange County showcases some of the best natural scenery in Central Florida, and nature lovers flock here to enjoy the more than 70 parks in the city. For those still looking for a resort feel, Winter Park also has top-notch golf courses and a popular shopping district.The city’s Main Street is a lively area. It serves as a cultural hub, complete with art galleries, a liberal arts college, museums, a cemetery and even a beach. Boaters enjoy having easy access to a launch nearby, and two of Winter Park’s most famous attractions are Rollins College and the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art. The latter destination is home to the United States’ largest collection of Tiffany glass.

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Geological Formations

Browns Canyon National Monument

The Browns Canyon National Monument is an area around the Arkansas River that's long been a popular recreational area. The nearly 22,000-acre area of the Arkansas River that is contained within the Browns Canyon National Monument is the United States' most popular place for whitewater rafting. It is also popular for its hiking and fishing opportunities. Prior to becoming a National Monument in 2015, the area had also been popular with hunters. With the designation, animals such as bighorn sheep, elk, and golden eagles are more protected.

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Cafe

Cafe Wha?

Located at 115 MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village, Cafe Wha? is a historic bar known for being the career birthplace of many well-known musicians and comedians. Open since the 1950s, some artists who consider Cafe Wha? a home include Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Bruce Springsteen, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, Bill Crosby and Peter, Paul & Mary, to name a few. Although it’s gone through many changes over the years, you can expect high energy music in an informal atmosphere every night of the week. In 1987, the Cafe Wha? House Band was employed, and are now known throughout the world and regularly feature celebrity guest performers. You can hear them live Wednesday through Sunday, playing everything from Motown to Reggae to Alternative Rock and more. On Monday nights you’ll hear Brazooka, a Brazilian dance band incorporating elements of Jazz and Samba, while Tuesdays are a mix of soul, R&B and Funk with Disfunktion.

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