Explore Germany

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

Photo by Kai Pilger on Unsplash

 

Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

Top Activities

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Bus Tours

Full-day Tours

Audio Guides

Top Attractions

Gardens & Parks

Tiergarten Park

Berlin’s Central Park is Tiergarten, a huge stretch of parkland, formal gardens and leafy walkways in the city’s west.Until the 1830s the parkland was used as a hunting ground. Today it houses the home of the German President, an array of public sculptures and memorials, canals and lakes, and a network of lovely shady avenues. The park’s avenues merge on the 66 meter (216 foot) Victory Tower, topped with a gilt angel. If you’re feeling fit, you can climb the 285 steps to a platform at the top to catch stupendous views of Berlin.

Learn More

Spa

Baden-Baden

One of the northernmost towns in Baden-Württemberg’s idyllic Black Forest region, the roman spa town of Baden-Baden has long been one of South Germany’s most popular holiday destinations, entertaining everyone from Queen Victoria to Victoria Beckham over the years. Perched on the French border, the historic town is a charming blend of French and German cultures, mixing its grand Art Nouveau villas with a wave of modern boutiques and chic cafés. The famed thermal waters remain one of Baden-Baden’s principal attractions, but once you’ve finished pampering yourself in a luxury spa, there are plenty of other sights to check out. Explore the ruins of the 2000-year-old Roman baths; visit the Belle Epoque Kurhaus and splash some cash at the extravagant Baden Baden Casino; or relax in the flower-lined parklands lining the Oos River.

Learn More

Geological Formations

Romantic Road

The Romantic Road leads through unspoiled areas, picturesque villages and past medieval castles. This attractive area gives the travelers a taste of typical German scenery and culture. As a former trade route built in the Middle Ages, the road has retained its medieval charm and distinctive character to this day. Take a half-day trip to Heidelberg, the old university town at the banks of Neckar River, including a visit of the inner courtyard of Heidelberg Castle, one of the most impressive historic landmarks of Germany. Visit Linderhof Castle, a brief shopping stop in Oberammergau before arriving in Hohenschwangau. Venture to a land of fairy tales with your castle visit to Neuschwanstein, breathtakingly majestic and built on the ruins of Vorder und Hinterhohenschwangau.

Learn More

 

See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

Top Activities

Bus Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Half-day Tours

Top Attractions

Well-known Landmarks

King's Lake (Konigssee)

The Königssee Valley lies in the Bavarian Alps and its lake forms part of the Berchtesgaden National Park. At five miles (7.5 km) long and just 1.5 miles (1.7 km) wide wide, the serene, crystal-clear waters of the lake are the deepest in Germany. Königssee is encircled by lush Alpine valleys and snow-capped mountains – the highest of these is Mount Watzmann, which towers over the lake at 5,900 ft (1,800 m). The picture-perfect Alpine village of Schönau am Königssee sits at the head of the lake and in summer hundreds of day trippers pour in daily. The lake is popular for swimming in the pristine Alpine waters or pottering around in electric boats. The most popular lake tour is to the squat, rotund pilgrimage chapel of St Bartholomew, topped with dark-red onion domes and standing on a little promontory lapped by water. Next-door is the former hunting lodge of the Bavarian kings, now the quality restaurant Fischerstüberl and a lovely spot for eating lunch looking over the lake.

Learn More

Scenic Landmarks

Black Forest

Although the Black Forest is located in the sunniest area of Germany, its name dates from a time when thick tree cover shielded the forest floor from light. There are more clearings now but the country’s largest and most renowned forest remains a 3D Grimm fairy tale dotted with gingerbread villages and serene wood-fringed lakes.The landscape rises from the Rhine Valley through gently undulating ground perfect for hiking, to the slopes of the Feldberg, a winter sports center. Firs and other evergreens predominate but the hills and valleys are garnished with enough deciduous trees to ensure spectacular fall displays.If you’re driving, the 60 kilometer-long “Schwarzwaldhochstrasse” starts at the elegant spa town of Baden-Baden in the north and takes in some of the region’s most scenic villages and breathtaking vistas. Otherwise, take advantage of the numerous scenic railway routes through the Black Forest. Try the romantic steam train journey Sauschwänzlebahn.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Main River

Flowing 527km between Mainz and Bamberg, and passing through 3 German states (Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg and Hesse), the Main River is one of the main tributaries of the mighty Rhine River. Running through the heart of Frankfurt, the river is not only the lifeline of the city’s industrial center, but brings with it a steady stream of cruise passengers.Frankfurt sightseeing cruises are also a popular way to take in the city’s sights, with attractions like Museumsufer (Museum Embankment), Frankfurt Cathedral, Frankfurt’s famed financial district, nicknamed ‘Little Manhattan’, and Europaturm, the city’s tallest building, all visible along the waterfront.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Lake Mummelsee

Lake Mummelsee, located along the Black Forest High Road scenic route, is the largest of seven mountain lakes remaining in the Black Forest. Perched 3,400 feet (1,036 meters) above sea level, the lake gets its name from the white water lilies, called ‘mummel’ in German, than float on its surface.According to local lore, a bevy of water sprites live with their king in a glorious crystal palace far below the surface of the water, coming out only at night to dance in the moonlight. Mermaids aside, Lake Mummelsee is circumnavigated by a boardwalk for lakeside strolls, while paddle boats ply the surface. A short trail leads up to a lookout tower atop Hornisgrinde, the highest peak in the area, where visitors can take in panoramic views of the Black Forest.

Learn More

 

Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

Top Activities

Classes & Workshops

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Bus Tours

Top Attractions

Religious Architecture

Andechs Monastery

Munich’s beer gardens are world famous but few offer such idyllic surroundings as the Andechs brewery, housed in the historic Andechs Monastery, 40km southwest of the city. Dating back to 1392, the Benedictine Abbey is perched atop the Holy Mountain of Heiliger Berg and overlooks the glittering Lake Ammersee. The Abbey’s beautifully preserved cloister is its oldest feature, but the architectural highlight is its striking Baroque church, remodeled in 1712, and climbing the church tower offers dramatic views over the Ammersee valley.A place of pilgrimage since the Middle Ages, the monastery is also famous for its adjourning brewery, which has been brewing traditional Bavarian beers since 1455 and continues to produce 7 different beer varieties. A popular day trip from nearby Munich, visitors to the Abbey can tuck into a meal at the monastery restaurant, sip a stein of Andechser Doppelbock, Andechs’ trademark dark beer, or even tour the working brewery.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Altes Museum (Old Museum)

The Old Museum, or Altes Museum in German, was completed in 1830 and was one of the most important buildings of the Neoclassical era. It consists of 18 Ionic columns, an expansive atrium, a grand staircase leading to the entrance and other details that, before this time, had only been seen on buildings designed for nobility and royalty.The museum houses art and other antiquities that display the cultures of ancient Greeks, Romans and Etruscans. On the main floor, you'll find an impressive display of ancient Grecian art from the 10th to first century BCE. The display includes sculptures, vases, jewelry and other crafts. In the blue chamber, there is a vast display of ancient coins from 7th century BCE up to coins from the Roman Empire in the late third century CE. The collection of over 1,300 coins corresponds with art on display from the same time period.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst

The German-Russian Museum sits on the exact location where the German Army gave its unconditional surrender on May 8, 1945, ending World War II. It serves as a memorial to the war between German and Russian forces, complimenting the Museum of the Allies, which focuses on the victorious western allies. The German-Russian Museum also documents pre-war history, the Cold War, and the relations between the USSR, East Germany and West Germany, covering the time in history between 1917 and 1990.The museum was opened in 1995 on the 50th anniversary of the German surrender. It was opened as a joint effort between Germany and Russia to remember the war and teach visitors about it. Items in the permanent exhibition include texts, photographs, films, and audio recordings. Special temporary exhibits provide an opportunity to dig deeper into specific topics relating to the history of the war and the German-Soviet relationships.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Schwules Museum (Gay Museum)

The success of the exhibit “Eldorado – the History, Everyday Life and Culture of Homosexual Women and Men 1850-1950” in 1984 at what was then called the Berlin Museum inspired the creation of the Schwules Museum, or the Gay Museum. The three people who initiated the original exhibition, along with a group of activists, founded the Verein der Freunde eines Schwulen Museums in 1985, and in 1986 they had their first exhibit. The museum has become incredibly successful over the years, and lending requests come from all over the world.Today the Schwules Museum is one of the world's largest and most significant institutions for archiving, researching and communicating the history and culture of LGBTQI communities. Changing exhibits examine different themes and concepts in history, art and culture. Exhibits have included themes such as drag queens, gender issues and AIDS, while some exhibitions are film.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Missing House

A haunting tribute to all that was lost in WWII, the aptly named ‘Missing House’ is powerful in simplicity – a visual metaphor that pushes visitors to consider the lasting effects of war. Destroyed by bombing in February 1945, the ‘house’ is now nothing more than an empty space between 2 buildings, but it was once part of a thriving mixed community, with both Jewish and non-Jewish former residents.Transformed into ‘a memorial space dedicated to absence’ by French artist Christian Boltanski in 1990, the neighboring houses are now adorned with brass plaques listing the house’s former residents. It’s a moving sight, with the stark space offering a poignant reminder of what is left behind after war, and the surprising variety of former residents (both in religion and class status) showcasing a diversity all but wiped out by the arrival of the Nazi regime.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe)

The Green Vault is one of the city museums in Dresden, Germany, and it is located in the Dresden Royal Palace. This collection of historical art and antiques has been called one of the greatest treasure chests in Europe. It is divided into two sections, the Historic Green Vault and the New Green Vault. In the Historic section, visitors will find works of art in a baroque setting displayed in front of mirrored walls without being in display cases. Items found here are made of amber, ivory, gemstones, and bronze. This section is located in the reconstructed chamber that August the Strong created.In the New Green Vault, visitors can see around 1,000 masterpieces of treasury art which are displayed in well-lit showcases made of anti-glare glass. This allows visitors to admire the art close up. Pieces in this section include precious objects made of gold, silver, enamel and gemstones, ivory, mother-of-pearl, coconuts and ostrich eggs.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Linderhof Castle

Ludwig II had a habit of designing palaces after his idols. In the case of Linderhof Palace, the inspiration was the Sun-King Louis XIV and Versailles as he built up the "King's Cottage". Sun decor, hall of mirrors, and a smaller scale version of Versailles Ambassador's staircase are testament to the king's admirations. As far as royal palaces go, Linderhof Palace has a private atmosphere with only four rooms that actually served a purpose. The gardens surrounding Linderhof Palace are considered some of the most beautiful in the world, combining the formal elements of Baroque style and Italian Renaissance gardens with landscaped sections in the English style. There are also a few unique structures apart of the palace park including the Venus grotto, Hunding's Hut, Gurnemanz Hermitage, and the Moroccan House.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Otto Weidt Museum (Museum Blindenwerkstatt Otto Weidt)

During World War II, Otto Weidt ran a workshop that produced brushes and brooms. His employees were mainly blind and deaf Jews, and he went to great lengths to protect them from persecution and deportation. He even found places for some of his Jewish works to hide, including one family that was hidden in the workshop. Today this workshop is the Museum Blindenwerkstatt Otto Weidt where visitors can learn about the history of Otto Weidt's efforts to save his workers from being sent to concentration camps.The museum's exhibition includes letters, poems, and photographs to describe what life was like for these workers whose lives were under constant threat. The exhibition also documents the employees' attempts to escape persecution and the important help provided by Otto Weidt. The workshop is mostly in the same state it was in during the war. This provides visitors with a valuable look at the conditions where the employees worked.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

New Guardhouse (Neue Wache)

The Neue Wache memorial in Berlin was built between 1816 and 1818. It was designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel as a memorial to those who had lost their lives in the Napoleonic wars. The Royal Guard was stationed at the memorial from 1818 to 1918. Later it became a memorial to the victims of World War I, but during World War II it was severely damaged by bombings. It was rebuilt in 1960 as a memorial to the victims of Fascism and Militarism and housed an eternal flame. In the center of the memorial site is a large sculpture called “Mother with her Dead Son” by Käthe Kollwitz. In 1969 a new element was incorporated into the memorial. The remains of an unknown soldier and an unknown concentration camp prisoner were buried there with earth taken from the battlefields of World War II and from concentration camps. Neue Wache became the Central Memorial of the Federal Republic of Germany for the Victims of War and Tyranny after Germany reunification.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Beer and Oktoberfest Museum

Housed in the oldest town house in Munich, the Beer and Oktoberfest Museum features permanent exhibitions on topics ranging from the history of beer to the Bavarian monks’ purity laws and the unique quality of Munich’s beer. As for the story of Oktoberfest, on the upper floor of the museum you’ll learn about its beginnings as a national festival for the 1810 wedding of King Luis to Princess Teresa, right through to today’s celebration — it’s the largest beer festival in the world attended by some 6 million people every year.You’ll see photos and illustrations, exhibits of brewery and beer-related memorabilia, including original beer mugs from the early years of Oktoberfest. A 12-minute documentary on the evolution of Bavarian beer-making also plays in the small cinema. And as you make your way round the exhibits, check out the building’s original wooden beam and restored murals — they date all the way back to 1340.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

German Historical Museum (Deutsches Historisches Museum)

With over 8,000 square meters of exhibition space devoted to German history, the German Historical Museum (Deutsches Historisches Museum) has been among Berlin’s most popular museums since it opened back in 1987. Since then, the vast permanent collection has grown to over 7,000 items, including rare manuscripts and official documents; fine art and sculptures; military uniforms, weapons and armory; posters and photographic images, and more. The focal point of a visit is the fascinating permanent exhibition ‘German History in Pictures and Artifacts’ which opened in 2006 and offers a chronological look at German history from the Middle Ages to modern-day. Walking through the two floors of exhibitions, visitors can learn about the evolution of Germany’s borders and language, the First and Second World Wars, the Nazi Regime, the Cold War division of Germany and its later reunification.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Führerbunker

The Führerbunker, translated to English means "Leader's bunker" was part of a subterranean bunker complex which was constructed in two major phases, one part in 1936 and the other in 1943. This bunker was a defensive military fortification designed to protect the inhabitants from falling bombs or other attack; in this case, the Führerbunker was to protect Adolf Hilter during WWII, and was the center of the Nazi regime. Hitler married Eva Braun here during the last week of April 1945, shortly before they committed suicide.The Bunker can be found at Wilhelmstrasse 77 near the corner of In den Ministergärten and Gertrud-Kolmar-Strasse, a short walk from Potsdamer Platz. It may be difficult to find independently as it is located in a grey apartment block backed onto a desolate car park, bordered by small wooden posts. You will find an information sign detailing the history of the site, which replaced a plaque that was there in 2006.

Learn More

Religious Architecture

New Synagogue

The New Synagogue in Berlin is a Moorish-style building that was built from 1859 to 1866. It was designed by Eduard Knoblauch, though he did not live to see it finished. The synagogue was built with a highly visible, large dome and had refined steel construction of the galleries and roof. It could seat 3,200 people, and it was the largest Jewish place of worship in Germany. By 1933 it was the center of the Jewish community for the 160,000 Jewish citizens of Berlin. Unfortunately it suffered great damage during the bombings of World War II. After extensive repairs and renovations, the New Synagogue reopened in May 1995. Today the Centrum Judaicum foundation is housed here. It is an institution for the preservation of Jewish memory and tradition and includes a museum. Exhibits trace the history of the synagogue, and guided tours show visitors the open space behind the restored facade, which was once the main synagogue room.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Old National Gallery (Alte Nationalgalerie)

One of the most impressive museums in Berlin is the Old National Gallery, or Alte Nationalgalerie in German. The museum was built between 1867 and 1876 and was designed to look like a temple. Though the building suffered damage during World War II, it was restored one section at a time in the decades following the war.In the Old National Gallery, you'll find art from the 19th century. Paintings and sculptures from many artists, such as Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir and Auguste Rodin, are on display here. This was actually the first museum in the world to purchase impressionist art when it acquired Édouard Manet’s In the Conservatory and Claude Monet’s View of Vétheuil in 1896. One of the most famous sculptures in the museum is Johann Gottfried Schadow’s Princesses Luise and Friederike located on the first floor.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror exhibition and documentation center covers the history of terror during the Nazi era. The centers of this national-socialist terror between 1933 and 1945 were the Gestapo and its prison, the SS headquarters, the SS Security Service (SD) and the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Main Office for State Security). These institutions were located in the immediate vicinity of the Nazi government district, and the history of the crimes originating there is featured at Topography of Terror. There is also a second exhibition that focuses on the role of Berlin as the capital of the Third Reich.Also on site is one of the few remaining sections of the Berlin Wall. Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, formed part of the border between the U.S. and Soviet sectors of Berlin, and the boundary ran along the south side of the street.

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Berlin Wall

The notorious wall that divided Berlin for nearly 30 years was erected by East Germany at the height of the Cold War in 1961. The barrier isolated West Berlin within a heavily armed barrier of double concrete walls and gun turrets and was constructed to stop disaffected East Germans escaping to the west; it was part of a strictly enforced military fortification that separated communist East Germany from capitalist Europe.Guards patrolling the wall’s watchtowers and mined "death strip" were ordered to shoot East Berliners attempting to escape to the west, and increasingly the wall became a canvas for protest murals and memorials.With the thawing of relations between east and west and the downfall of communism in Poland, the Czech Republic and other central European countries, the Berlin Wall was ceremonially torn down in November 1989 with the world’s media as witness.Sections of the wall remain as permanent reminders of the days when Germany was split.

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Reichstag

Topped with an acclaimed glass dome designed by British architect Norman Foster, the Reichstag parliamentary building is home to Germany’s Parliament, the Bundestag.The classically pedimented and columned building was built in the 1890s, and seriously damaged by fire in 1933 and subsequent air raids. In the 1990s the building was restored to host the parliament of the newly reunified Germany.Visitors can step inside the multi-tiered glass dome and onto the roof terrace for 360 degree views of Berlin’s government district and the Tiergarten.Take an audioguide tour to learn about the parliamentary goings on in the Bundestag and the history of the famous building. After taking a stroll, relax in the rooftop restaurant.

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle was commissioned as the private refuge for Ludwig II of Bavaria, but opened to the public immediately after his death in 1886. Now recognizable as the inspiration for Disney's Sleeping Beauty Castle, Neuschwanstein is one of the most popular castles in Europe. The fairytale charm of Neuschwanstein Castle is also felt from the idyllic scenery of the Bavarian Alps. During the winter, some of the best views of the snow-capped mountains can be seen from the palace grounds.The picture cycles in the castle were inspired by the operas of Richard Wagner, to whom the king dedicated the castle, and the corresponding medieval legends from his works. The throne room is magnificently decorated with frescos of angels, ironically the king died before the actual throne was built. Despite the medieval motif of the decor, the castle was actually outfitted with latest technology of the time with running water and central heating.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Albertinum

Named after King Albert of Saxony, the Albertinum is an art museum located in the historic city center of Dresden. The museum focuses on painting and sculpture from the Romantic period to the present day, and its collections — which range from Rodin to Richter — have earned the museum a worldwide reputation as a center for fine art in Germany. With a large restoration program, the Albertinum's glass-fronted display storerooms allow visitors to get insights into the museum's internal workings and how the restoration process works. The Renaissance-style building that houses the museum, completed in 1563, was once a military arsenal and now has archives instead of weapons in its immense vaults, as a new arsenal was built for Dresden in the late 19th century.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site

Dachau Concentration Camp was the first of its kind opened in Germany by the Nazi government in 1933, and it served as a model for later concentration camps. Designed to hold Jews, political prisoners, and other "undesirables," the camp is now a memorial to the more than 40,000 people who died and over 200,000 who were imprisoned here during the Nazi regime. The memorial was established in 1965, 20 years after Dachau was liberated by American forces. An English documentary of Dachau plays in the museum part of the memorial at 11:30 am, 2 pm, and 3:30 pm and the "Path of the Prisoners" exhibit sheds light on the lives of those in the concentration camp. Although a sobering excursion, many visitors find the trip extremely moving and informative about the Holocaust.

Learn More

Religious Architecture

Deutscher Dom

The Deutscher Dom, or German Cathedral in English, was built in the early 1700s in Berlin and was originally known as the Neue Kirche, or New Church. The church was badly damaged during World War II and was slowly rebuilt in the 80s and 90s. Today it is a museum and no longer holds religious services. The permanent exhibition on display is called "Wege - Irrwege - Umwege" which roughly translates to “Paths - Meanderings - Detours” and explains the historical development of the liberal parliamentary system in Germany.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke)

The Old Bridge in Heidelberg is a sandstone pedestrian bridge that goes across the Neckar River linking the old town on one side with the Neuenheim district on the other. It was built in 1786, and even though there were several other bridges before it in this location, it was the first one made of stone. On the city side of the bridge, there are two towers that once formed part of the city walls. They contain old dungeons which were used to hold criminals. Between the towers, you can see a plaque honoring the Austrian troops who helped defend the bridge against an attack from the French in 1799.Another feature visitors will notice is a statue of a monkey holding a mirror. The monkey represents the idea that neither those who lived within the city walls nor those who lived outside the city were any better than the other, and that they should look over their shoulder as the cross the bridge to remember this.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Kulturforum

Berlin’s biggest cultural center is the Kulturforum, an affiliation of 12 prestigious museums, galleries, libraries, churches and concert halls whose overall concept was designed by Modernist architect Hans Scharoun in the 1960s. The forum sits just off Potsdamer Platz, which was brutally divided by the Berlin Wall during the Cold War, and it came to represent West German success in the face of increasing poverty and degradation in East Germany before the Wall was ripped down in 1989. Today it is highly regarded both for its architectural diversity and its top-quality museums. Places of interest at the Kulturforum include the Gemäldegalerie, with a world-class collection of medieval art, and the Neue Nationalgalerie (New National Gallery), a steel and-glass masterpiece designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in 1968 that houses Germany’s most important collection of European art — it is currently closed until 2019 for refurbishment.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Cologne Chocolate Museum (Schokoladenmuseum)

Hans Imhoff, a chocolatier and businessman from Cologne, opened the Schokoladenmuseum in 1993, after retiring from the confectionary business in 1992. The museum that bears the late industrialist's name is a paen to the product of the cacao bean, from its development and primitive processing in the New World by the Olmecs, Mayans and Aztecs, to modern production methods and innovations. The program discusses the role of chocolate in later South American societies and among European elite. The museum sits inside a glass-and-steel structure shaped like a ship. Inside, the tour takes visitors through the process of chocolate production from the farm to the candy store, continuing through a greenhouse where two species of cacao trees are grown and then on through the industrialization of chocolate production, including vintage advertising campaigns. Miniature machinery allow guests a closer look at the production process, and the chocolate produced by these machines can be sampled.

Learn More

Religious Architecture

St. Peter's Church (Peterskirche)

The oldest church in Munich, St. Peter's Church, or Peterskirche, is a Roman Catholic establishment built in the 12th century in the Bavarian Romanesque style. The interior of the church features the magnificent Mariahilf-Altar, Gothic paintings & sculptures, and a ceiling fresco. But even these beautiful works of art can't top the bizarre gem-studded skeleton of St. Mundita, who stares at visitors with false eyes and jewelled teeth.From the spire of "Old Peter", as the church is known to the locals, are spectacular views of the oldest part of Munich. Remember to check the colored rings at the bottom, a white ring means the Alps are visible, making the hike to the top even more worthwhile. Although the spire was almost completely destroyed during World War II, it was fully restored with the traditional architecture.

Learn More

 

Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

Top Attractions

Museums & Exhibitions

Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (Holocaust Memorial)

The Holocaust Memorial, also known as The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, is an urban tribute to remember and honor up to six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Located within walking distance between the Brandenburg Gate and Potsdamer Platz, the Memorial consists of the Field of Stelae designed by Peter Eisenman and the underground Information Center. Eisenmann set up 2,711 concrete pillars - so-called stelaes - of varying heights to create a grid-like structure that can be approached from all angles. You can feel the unmarked and harrowed suffering as you walk through the pillars that rise as you continue through them. The underground and modern information center complements the outdoor memorial, where visitors can learn more about the victims of the Holocaust and deepen understanding about this tragedy.

Learn More

Casinos

Casino Baden-Baden

Germany’s oldest casino opened for business in 1855 after a visiting Parisian brought up the idea of opening gaming rooms in the Black Forest spa town to add some spice to the evening entertainment options. While gambling became popular in the town during the early decades of the nineteenth century, it wasn’t until 1855 that Casino Baden-Baden came to be, and it still showcases the same glitz and glamour of the Second Empire. Parisian designers fashioned the casino with crystal chandeliers, ornate frescoes and rich tapestries reminiscent of Fontainebleau or Versailles in France. While gambling remains a popular diversion, visitors can also take guided tours of the historic casino and hear tales of its storied past and famous patrons.

Learn More

 

Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

Top Attractions

Water Activities & Tours

Eisbach Wave (Eisbachwelle)

When thinking of places to go surfing, Germany's landlocked city of Munich is probably not the first to come to mind. But interestingly enough, surfers have been riding the waves in the city's Isar River since the 1970s. A man-made arm of the Isar, the Eisbach (German for 'ice brook') flows for 1.25 miles (2 km) through a large city park known as the English Garden (Englischer Garten). Just past the bridge near the House of the Arts (Haus der Kunst) art museum, the Eisbach forms a standing wave of over three feet (1 meter). Surfers have rigged the wave by building a system of ropes and planks to channel it into something so surfable, it's home to an annual surfing competition and has hosted world-class surf legends such as Kelly Slater and Jack Johnson. Travelers visiting in summer can see surfers queued up waiting patiently for their turn to shred.

Learn More

 

Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

Top Activities

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Top Attractions

Buildings & Structure

Herrenchiemsee New Palace

Herreninsel is the larger of two inhabited islands in Chiemsee, a Bavarian lake near the Austrian border. While it features a monastery which dates back to the 8th century, the site of the post-war conference which drafted West Germany’s constitution, the island’s main attraction is undoubtedly Herrenchiemsee. This was one of the three palaces built by the profligate 19th century Bavarian king, Ludwig II. But unlike Linderhof or the world-famous Neuschwanstein, Herrenchiemsee is not a pastiche of previous styles, rather it’s a copy of one particular building: the Palace of Versailles.Ludwig’s palace is a salute to an era when monarchs were both the pinnacles of power and arbiters of style. But funds ran out before he could complete Herrenchiemsee, and only the central section was completed. As well as lavishly decorated rooms – boasting the world’s largest porcelain chandelier and a replica of the Hall of Mirrors – there are also eerie bare-walled loft-like spaces.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Hohenschwangau Castle

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Alpsee and Schwansee lakes and close by the Austrian border, the magnificent Hohenschwangau Castle (Schloss Hohenschwangau) is a dramatic gothic fortress dating back to the 19th century. The sister castle to the world-renowned Neuschwanstein Castle (the famous blueprint for Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle), Hohenschwangau is a popular stop on the German Castle Trail and is often visited on day trips from Munich or nearby Füssen.Hohenschwangau Castle was built in 1832 on the site of the 12th-century Schuangau fortress and is celebrated for its striking interior décor, including a series of paintings by Domenik Quaglio depicting key events in German history. Built by King Maximilian II of Bavaria, the palace is notable as the childhood home of his heir, the future King Ludwig II of Bavaria.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Marble Palace (Marmorpalais)

Marmorpalais, or Marble Palace in English, is the former royal residence in Potsdam, Germany, outside of Berlin. It sits on the grounds of the Neuer Garten along the shores of the Heiliger Lake. It was designed in a Neoclassical style in the late 1700s and remained as the home of royalty until the early 20th century. Today the palace serves as a museum and is open to the public. Visitors can explore the interiors and see early classical furniture and detailed arches, which have different designs in almost every room.The Marble Palace also has several marble fireplaces and ancient sculptures that were obtained from Italy. Local trees were used for creating the high quality wood floors and other detailed aspects of the palace. Some of the walls are covered in fine silks. Other impressive items on display here include two grandfather clocks and an extensive collection of ceramic vases.

Learn More

Theatres & Cinemas

Bavarian State Opera (Bayerische Staatsoper)

The Bavarian State Opera is one of the world’s leading opera houses, with over 400 performances and 600,000 visitors yearly. Its history spans over three centuries and helped shape Munich as we know it today, a culture-savvy metropolis with unparalleled elegance and flair. Thanks to a controversial yet deep friendship with King Ludwig II, Richard Wagner himself premiered many of his music dramas (including The Valkyrie, The Master-Singers of Nuremberg, The Fairies, The Rhinegold, and Tristan and Isolde) at the Bavarian State Opera, which at the time – and arguably still is to this day – was considered the limelight of music in Europe. Nowadays, over 30 different operas, recitals, ballets, and concerts are staged every season in the splendid original Rococo Cuvilliés-Theater, the largest of its kind in Germany and perhaps the most spectacular in all of Europe. This is also where the Munich Opera Festival, the most important and acclaimed opera festival in the world, takes places.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Ehrenbreitstein Fortress (Festung Ehrenbreitstein)

Sitting opposite Koblenz on the banks of the Rhine, there has been a castle of some sort at Ehrenbreitstein since the early Middle Ages. Its current form dates from the early 19th century, when it was expanded into Europe’s largest fortress to protect the town on the outer reaches of the Prussian empire. Today the castle has a more peaceful task: to house the Regional Museum of Koblenz, which is in the casemates and is dedicated to the wines of the region. It also houses an exhibition on Rhineland inventions and commercial successes (which include Audi cars) as well as a small collection of archaeological artifacts excavated from across the region. A visitor trail through the complex encompasses canons, a multimedia show on the history of the fortress, and peerless view from the viewing platform of the flag tower; it provides the perfect vantage point overlooking Deutsches Eck (German Corner), the country’s premier memorial to reunification.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Cecilienhof Palace (Schloss Cecilienhof)

Potsdam’s Cecilienhof Palace (Schloss Cecilienhof) was the last palace built by the House of Hohenzollern, the dynasty that ruled the Kingdom of Prussia and the German Empire until the end of World War I. These days, the former home of Crown Prince Wilhelm is best known for the role it played as the location for the Potsdam Conference of 1945, during which the leaders of the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States (The ‘Big Three’) negotiated the terms for the end of WWII.Today, the 176-room castle is an historic memorial and museum where visitors can tour the impressive working rooms where the conference took place. Schloss Cecilienhof is located in the northern part of the large Neuer Garten park, close to the shore of the Jungfernsee (Virgins’ Lake). The lake, once a glacial kettle, is now a part of the River Havel. Lunch or dinner can be found right on the lake at the former working dairy, now a hearty restaurant and brewery.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Palace of Tears (Tränenpalast)

Palace of Tears, or Tränenpalast in German, is a building at Berlin's Friedrichstrasse station that was a border crossing point during the time when the city was split between East and West. It was used by people crossing into West Berlin, so those transiting through here were mostly people who lived in West Berlin who were returning home after visiting family in East Berlin. Due to the painful good-byes that took place here, it was dubbed the Palace of Tears. It was built in 1962 and operated until the Berlin Wall came down in 1989.Today it serves as a museum with a permanent exhibition detailing the border experience and every day life in the divided Germany. Visitors can view original materials, photographs, films, documents, and interviews with witnesses, all of which document the effects and consequences of the border on the lives of Germans during this time. The exhibition also displays information on the key turning points of the reunification process.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Jungfernstieg

The stores on Jungfernstieg are mostly upscale shops where you can find high-end clothing, shoes, and jewelry. You can also find accessories, bath products, perfumes, cosmetics, and purses. There is also a spa where you can get a massage and other wellness services. Along with department stores and boutiques, there is also a wide selection of restaurants and cafes where you can stop for a meal while you're shopping.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Charlottenburg Palace (Schloss Charlottenburg)

To experience the pomp and majesty of the Hohenzollern Dynasty, pay a visit to Charlottenburg Palace (or Schloss Charlottenburg), Berlin’s largest palace.Built in the 17th and 18th centuries, the palace combines rococo and baroque decor and architecture, and is surrounded by landscaped gardens in the manner of Versailles.Visitors can tour the baroque rooms of the Old Palace, and the rococo apartments of Frederick the Great in the New Wing. German porcelain is displayed in the Belvedere building, and the marble tombs of famous Hohenzollerns lie in the mausoleum.The treed grounds are ideal for leisurely strolls, and the restored Orangery now operates as a cafe.

Learn More

Theatres & Cinemas

Old Opera House (Alte Oper)

Inaugurated in 1880 Frankfurt’s Old Opera House (Alte Oper) was among Germany’s elite opera houses during its 20th-century heyday, but by 1951 the building had been badly damaged by fire and a new Opera house had sprung up to take its place. Further damage was sustained throughout the war years and it wasn’t until 1981 that the Old Opera House, saved from demolition by a public petition, was reconstructed and reopened.With its exteriors and entrance hall restored to reflect the Renaissance design of original architect Richard Lucae, the Old Opera House is now serving out its days as a magnificent concert hall and congress center. After being fated with the post-war nickname of ‘Germany’s most beautiful ruin’, the modern Alte Oper complex is now one of the city’s leading concert venues, hosting around 300 classical and popular music events throughout the year and drawing many additional visitors to its atmospheric onsite café.

Learn More

 

Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

Top Activities

Wine Tastings

Beer & Brewery Tours

Street Food Tours

Top Attractions

Market

Victuals Market (Viktualienmarkt)

Where can you find the best gourmet Bavarian delights? Munich's Victuals Market, Viktualienmarkt in German, is the place to find exotic fruits, fresh vegetables, artisan cheeses, delicious hams, honey, and truffles. Many of the market stalls in the Viktualienmarkt have been family-run for generations, and although the gourmet food featured here also means gourmet prices, you would be hard pressed to find better quality culinary delicacies. While in Munich, the Viktualienmarkt is the best place to shop for delicious Bavarian food to make for a picnic lunch at a nearby park.

Learn More

 

Germany

25 Featured Attractions

Religious Architecture

Andechs Monastery

Munich’s beer gardens are world famous but few offer such idyllic surroundings as the Andechs brewery, housed in the historic Andechs Monastery, 40km southwest of the city. Dating back to 1392, the Benedictine Abbey is perched atop the Holy Mountain of Heiliger Berg and overlooks the glittering Lake Ammersee. The Abbey’s beautifully preserved cloister is its oldest feature, but the architectural highlight is its striking Baroque church, remodeled in 1712, and climbing the church tower offers dramatic views over the Ammersee valley.A place of pilgrimage since the Middle Ages, the monastery is also famous for its adjourning brewery, which has been brewing traditional Bavarian beers since 1455 and continues to produce 7 different beer varieties. A popular day trip from nearby Munich, visitors to the Abbey can tuck into a meal at the monastery restaurant, sip a stein of Andechser Doppelbock, Andechs’ trademark dark beer, or even tour the working brewery.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Altes Museum (Old Museum)

The Old Museum, or Altes Museum in German, was completed in 1830 and was one of the most important buildings of the Neoclassical era. It consists of 18 Ionic columns, an expansive atrium, a grand staircase leading to the entrance and other details that, before this time, had only been seen on buildings designed for nobility and royalty.The museum houses art and other antiquities that display the cultures of ancient Greeks, Romans and Etruscans. On the main floor, you'll find an impressive display of ancient Grecian art from the 10th to first century BCE. The display includes sculptures, vases, jewelry and other crafts. In the blue chamber, there is a vast display of ancient coins from 7th century BCE up to coins from the Roman Empire in the late third century CE. The collection of over 1,300 coins corresponds with art on display from the same time period.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Hauptwache

Located a few blocks north of Römerberg square, Hauptwache is one of Frankfurt’s most famous public squares, leading onto the city’s principal shopping street, the Zeil. The square takes its name from the restored 1729 baroque building of the same name, the former headquarters of the city's Stadtwehr Militia that now serves as a lively café and dominates the center of the square, overlooking the Zeil.A medley of architectural styles mark the Hauptwache, including the 17th-century baroque-style St Katharina Church, with its 54-meter tall clock tower; the futuristic mirrored façade of the My Zeil shopping mall and the neighboring glass-fronted Zeilgalerie; and the towering Commerzbank, Germany’s tallest skyscraper. Beside the Hauptwache café, a sunken terrace area, nicknamed ‘the Hole’ by locals, leads to an underground passageway of shops and eateries, linking the square to the Kaufhof department store.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst

The German-Russian Museum sits on the exact location where the German Army gave its unconditional surrender on May 8, 1945, ending World War II. It serves as a memorial to the war between German and Russian forces, complimenting the Museum of the Allies, which focuses on the victorious western allies. The German-Russian Museum also documents pre-war history, the Cold War, and the relations between the USSR, East Germany and West Germany, covering the time in history between 1917 and 1990.The museum was opened in 1995 on the 50th anniversary of the German surrender. It was opened as a joint effort between Germany and Russia to remember the war and teach visitors about it. Items in the permanent exhibition include texts, photographs, films, and audio recordings. Special temporary exhibits provide an opportunity to dig deeper into specific topics relating to the history of the war and the German-Soviet relationships.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Schwules Museum (Gay Museum)

The success of the exhibit “Eldorado – the History, Everyday Life and Culture of Homosexual Women and Men 1850-1950” in 1984 at what was then called the Berlin Museum inspired the creation of the Schwules Museum, or the Gay Museum. The three people who initiated the original exhibition, along with a group of activists, founded the Verein der Freunde eines Schwulen Museums in 1985, and in 1986 they had their first exhibit. The museum has become incredibly successful over the years, and lending requests come from all over the world.Today the Schwules Museum is one of the world's largest and most significant institutions for archiving, researching and communicating the history and culture of LGBTQI communities. Changing exhibits examine different themes and concepts in history, art and culture. Exhibits have included themes such as drag queens, gender issues and AIDS, while some exhibitions are film.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Missing House

A haunting tribute to all that was lost in WWII, the aptly named ‘Missing House’ is powerful in simplicity – a visual metaphor that pushes visitors to consider the lasting effects of war. Destroyed by bombing in February 1945, the ‘house’ is now nothing more than an empty space between 2 buildings, but it was once part of a thriving mixed community, with both Jewish and non-Jewish former residents.Transformed into ‘a memorial space dedicated to absence’ by French artist Christian Boltanski in 1990, the neighboring houses are now adorned with brass plaques listing the house’s former residents. It’s a moving sight, with the stark space offering a poignant reminder of what is left behind after war, and the surprising variety of former residents (both in religion and class status) showcasing a diversity all but wiped out by the arrival of the Nazi regime.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Prenzlauer Berg

Prenzlauer Berg is a neighborhood in Berlin west of Mitte and was part of East Berlin while the city was divided. During World War II, relatively few buildings were destroyed in this area compared with other parts of the city, and as a result, there are over 300 buildings are protected as historic monuments.The neighborhood has a wide variety of restaurants, bars and clubs where many people spend their evenings, mostly near the Eberswalder Strasse U-bahn station, as well as art galleries and trendy boutiques. In the western part of the neighborhood, near Mitte, you'll find Mauerpark. Literally translated, this means Wall Park. It was a section of the city where the wall separated East from West, and Mauerpark was in the no man's land between the layers of the border. It was the site of the Old Nordbahnhof (north train station) freight yard until the wall was built, cutting it off from the city.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Herrenchiemsee New Palace

Herreninsel is the larger of two inhabited islands in Chiemsee, a Bavarian lake near the Austrian border. While it features a monastery which dates back to the 8th century, the site of the post-war conference which drafted West Germany’s constitution, the island’s main attraction is undoubtedly Herrenchiemsee. This was one of the three palaces built by the profligate 19th century Bavarian king, Ludwig II. But unlike Linderhof or the world-famous Neuschwanstein, Herrenchiemsee is not a pastiche of previous styles, rather it’s a copy of one particular building: the Palace of Versailles.Ludwig’s palace is a salute to an era when monarchs were both the pinnacles of power and arbiters of style. But funds ran out before he could complete Herrenchiemsee, and only the central section was completed. As well as lavishly decorated rooms – boasting the world’s largest porcelain chandelier and a replica of the Hall of Mirrors – there are also eerie bare-walled loft-like spaces.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Hohenschwangau Castle

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Alpsee and Schwansee lakes and close by the Austrian border, the magnificent Hohenschwangau Castle (Schloss Hohenschwangau) is a dramatic gothic fortress dating back to the 19th century. The sister castle to the world-renowned Neuschwanstein Castle (the famous blueprint for Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle), Hohenschwangau is a popular stop on the German Castle Trail and is often visited on day trips from Munich or nearby Füssen.Hohenschwangau Castle was built in 1832 on the site of the 12th-century Schuangau fortress and is celebrated for its striking interior décor, including a series of paintings by Domenik Quaglio depicting key events in German history. Built by King Maximilian II of Bavaria, the palace is notable as the childhood home of his heir, the future King Ludwig II of Bavaria.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe)

The Green Vault is one of the city museums in Dresden, Germany, and it is located in the Dresden Royal Palace. This collection of historical art and antiques has been called one of the greatest treasure chests in Europe. It is divided into two sections, the Historic Green Vault and the New Green Vault. In the Historic section, visitors will find works of art in a baroque setting displayed in front of mirrored walls without being in display cases. Items found here are made of amber, ivory, gemstones, and bronze. This section is located in the reconstructed chamber that August the Strong created.In the New Green Vault, visitors can see around 1,000 masterpieces of treasury art which are displayed in well-lit showcases made of anti-glare glass. This allows visitors to admire the art close up. Pieces in this section include precious objects made of gold, silver, enamel and gemstones, ivory, mother-of-pearl, coconuts and ostrich eggs.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Linderhof Castle

Ludwig II had a habit of designing palaces after his idols. In the case of Linderhof Palace, the inspiration was the Sun-King Louis XIV and Versailles as he built up the "King's Cottage". Sun decor, hall of mirrors, and a smaller scale version of Versailles Ambassador's staircase are testament to the king's admirations. As far as royal palaces go, Linderhof Palace has a private atmosphere with only four rooms that actually served a purpose. The gardens surrounding Linderhof Palace are considered some of the most beautiful in the world, combining the formal elements of Baroque style and Italian Renaissance gardens with landscaped sections in the English style. There are also a few unique structures apart of the palace park including the Venus grotto, Hunding's Hut, Gurnemanz Hermitage, and the Moroccan House.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Otto Weidt Museum (Museum Blindenwerkstatt Otto Weidt)

During World War II, Otto Weidt ran a workshop that produced brushes and brooms. His employees were mainly blind and deaf Jews, and he went to great lengths to protect them from persecution and deportation. He even found places for some of his Jewish works to hide, including one family that was hidden in the workshop. Today this workshop is the Museum Blindenwerkstatt Otto Weidt where visitors can learn about the history of Otto Weidt's efforts to save his workers from being sent to concentration camps.The museum's exhibition includes letters, poems, and photographs to describe what life was like for these workers whose lives were under constant threat. The exhibition also documents the employees' attempts to escape persecution and the important help provided by Otto Weidt. The workshop is mostly in the same state it was in during the war. This provides visitors with a valuable look at the conditions where the employees worked.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

New Guardhouse (Neue Wache)

The Neue Wache memorial in Berlin was built between 1816 and 1818. It was designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel as a memorial to those who had lost their lives in the Napoleonic wars. The Royal Guard was stationed at the memorial from 1818 to 1918. Later it became a memorial to the victims of World War I, but during World War II it was severely damaged by bombings. It was rebuilt in 1960 as a memorial to the victims of Fascism and Militarism and housed an eternal flame. In the center of the memorial site is a large sculpture called “Mother with her Dead Son” by Käthe Kollwitz. In 1969 a new element was incorporated into the memorial. The remains of an unknown soldier and an unknown concentration camp prisoner were buried there with earth taken from the battlefields of World War II and from concentration camps. Neue Wache became the Central Memorial of the Federal Republic of Germany for the Victims of War and Tyranny after Germany reunification.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Hackesche Höfe

Hackeschen Hoefe is the largest enclosed courtyard area in Germany, consisting of eight interconnected areas. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, this courtyard area has become a central contact point for locals and visitors alike. Opened in 1906, the building complex originally consisted of offices, businesses, factories and apartments. It was designed in an Art Nouveau style by designer and architect August Endel, which was heavily preserved and restored in 1972. During renovations in the 1990s, the concept of having businesses and apartments in the same building was once again put into practice. Today, the eight courtyards between Rosenthaler Strasse and the Sophien Strasse encompass 27,000 square meters for 40 industrial enterprises, cultural institutions and apartments. All around the courtyards, you'll also find bars, clubs and restaurants, making this area a popular spot for nightlife. There are also several smaller shops and art galleries, as well as a movie theater.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Beer and Oktoberfest Museum

Housed in the oldest town house in Munich, the Beer and Oktoberfest Museum features permanent exhibitions on topics ranging from the history of beer to the Bavarian monks’ purity laws and the unique quality of Munich’s beer. As for the story of Oktoberfest, on the upper floor of the museum you’ll learn about its beginnings as a national festival for the 1810 wedding of King Luis to Princess Teresa, right through to today’s celebration — it’s the largest beer festival in the world attended by some 6 million people every year.You’ll see photos and illustrations, exhibits of brewery and beer-related memorabilia, including original beer mugs from the early years of Oktoberfest. A 12-minute documentary on the evolution of Bavarian beer-making also plays in the small cinema. And as you make your way round the exhibits, check out the building’s original wooden beam and restored murals — they date all the way back to 1340.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

German Historical Museum (Deutsches Historisches Museum)

With over 8,000 square meters of exhibition space devoted to German history, the German Historical Museum (Deutsches Historisches Museum) has been among Berlin’s most popular museums since it opened back in 1987. Since then, the vast permanent collection has grown to over 7,000 items, including rare manuscripts and official documents; fine art and sculptures; military uniforms, weapons and armory; posters and photographic images, and more. The focal point of a visit is the fascinating permanent exhibition ‘German History in Pictures and Artifacts’ which opened in 2006 and offers a chronological look at German history from the Middle Ages to modern-day. Walking through the two floors of exhibitions, visitors can learn about the evolution of Germany’s borders and language, the First and Second World Wars, the Nazi Regime, the Cold War division of Germany and its later reunification.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Deichstrasse

Deichstrasse is the oldest street in Hamburg, Germany dating back to the 14th century. It is located near Speicherstadt, which is the old warehouse district near the harbor. The Great Fire of 1842 destroyed many of the original 14th century buildings on this street, so most of what you see today are restored 17th-19th century buildings. The tall, narrow, half-timbered houses here represent typical architecture from this region a few hundred years ago.The harbor and the warehouse district played a big part in shaping Hamburg as a city, and a visit here will give you a glimpse at the city's history. Along this road, you will find many restaurants and pubs. The Johannes Brahms Museum is located at number 39, which is the composer's former home. The Telemann Museum, a great place for music lovers, is also located in this area. Around the corner at Peterstrasse 35-39 is a replica of the Beylingstift complex, a baroque building built in 1751.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Führerbunker

The Führerbunker, translated to English means "Leader's bunker" was part of a subterranean bunker complex which was constructed in two major phases, one part in 1936 and the other in 1943. This bunker was a defensive military fortification designed to protect the inhabitants from falling bombs or other attack; in this case, the Führerbunker was to protect Adolf Hilter during WWII, and was the center of the Nazi regime. Hitler married Eva Braun here during the last week of April 1945, shortly before they committed suicide.The Bunker can be found at Wilhelmstrasse 77 near the corner of In den Ministergärten and Gertrud-Kolmar-Strasse, a short walk from Potsdamer Platz. It may be difficult to find independently as it is located in a grey apartment block backed onto a desolate car park, bordered by small wooden posts. You will find an information sign detailing the history of the site, which replaced a plaque that was there in 2006.

Learn More

Religious Architecture

New Synagogue

The New Synagogue in Berlin is a Moorish-style building that was built from 1859 to 1866. It was designed by Eduard Knoblauch, though he did not live to see it finished. The synagogue was built with a highly visible, large dome and had refined steel construction of the galleries and roof. It could seat 3,200 people, and it was the largest Jewish place of worship in Germany. By 1933 it was the center of the Jewish community for the 160,000 Jewish citizens of Berlin. Unfortunately it suffered great damage during the bombings of World War II. After extensive repairs and renovations, the New Synagogue reopened in May 1995. Today the Centrum Judaicum foundation is housed here. It is an institution for the preservation of Jewish memory and tradition and includes a museum. Exhibits trace the history of the synagogue, and guided tours show visitors the open space behind the restored facade, which was once the main synagogue room.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Old National Gallery (Alte Nationalgalerie)

One of the most impressive museums in Berlin is the Old National Gallery, or Alte Nationalgalerie in German. The museum was built between 1867 and 1876 and was designed to look like a temple. Though the building suffered damage during World War II, it was restored one section at a time in the decades following the war.In the Old National Gallery, you'll find art from the 19th century. Paintings and sculptures from many artists, such as Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir and Auguste Rodin, are on display here. This was actually the first museum in the world to purchase impressionist art when it acquired Édouard Manet’s In the Conservatory and Claude Monet’s View of Vétheuil in 1896. One of the most famous sculptures in the museum is Johann Gottfried Schadow’s Princesses Luise and Friederike located on the first floor.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Bebelplatz

The Bebelplatz is a public square in the central ‘Mitte’ district of Germany’s capital city, Berlin. Today it is best known for being the site where some 20,000 newly banned books were burned by bonfire in 1933 on order of Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi propaganda minister, because they conflicted with Nazi ideology. The square is surrounded by notable historical buildings, including the German State Opera (Staatsoper); St. Hedwig’s Cathedral (built in 1747 and modeled after Rome’s Pantheon, it was the first Catholic church built in Germany after the Protestant Reformation); and the former Royal Prussian Library (Alte Bibliothek) which is now part of Humboldt University.All of the buildings on the Bebelplatz were destroyed in World War II and reconstructed afterward. An easily overlooked monument in the center of the square simply contains a pane of glass, which the visitor can look through to see many rows of empty bookshelves underground.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror exhibition and documentation center covers the history of terror during the Nazi era. The centers of this national-socialist terror between 1933 and 1945 were the Gestapo and its prison, the SS headquarters, the SS Security Service (SD) and the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Main Office for State Security). These institutions were located in the immediate vicinity of the Nazi government district, and the history of the crimes originating there is featured at Topography of Terror. There is also a second exhibition that focuses on the role of Berlin as the capital of the Third Reich.Also on site is one of the few remaining sections of the Berlin Wall. Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, formed part of the border between the U.S. and Soviet sectors of Berlin, and the boundary ran along the south side of the street.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Friedrichstrasse

Friedrichstrasse runs north to south through the center of Berlin, while during the Cold War, the Berlin Wall cut through this street. The Friedrichstrasse S-bahn and U-bahn station was on the East, but trains from the West were still able to stop there so passengers could transfer lines. However, they could not leave the station without proper paperwork.Today the street is a major shopping and residential area. However, due to its history, it is also a popular tourist spot. Photography exhibits at the Friedrichstrasse station show the stages of the station's history from 1961 when the wall went up to 1989 when it came down. At the Berlin Wall History Mile information board at the Friedrichstrasse border crossing, you can learn about Oct. 27, 1961, when Allied and Soviet tanks conflicted over the right to unrestricted movement in both parts of Berlin for the Allied forces.

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Berlin Wall

The notorious wall that divided Berlin for nearly 30 years was erected by East Germany at the height of the Cold War in 1961. The barrier isolated West Berlin within a heavily armed barrier of double concrete walls and gun turrets and was constructed to stop disaffected East Germans escaping to the west; it was part of a strictly enforced military fortification that separated communist East Germany from capitalist Europe.Guards patrolling the wall’s watchtowers and mined "death strip" were ordered to shoot East Berliners attempting to escape to the west, and increasingly the wall became a canvas for protest murals and memorials.With the thawing of relations between east and west and the downfall of communism in Poland, the Czech Republic and other central European countries, the Berlin Wall was ceremonially torn down in November 1989 with the world’s media as witness.Sections of the wall remain as permanent reminders of the days when Germany was split.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Marble Palace (Marmorpalais)

Marmorpalais, or Marble Palace in English, is the former royal residence in Potsdam, Germany, outside of Berlin. It sits on the grounds of the Neuer Garten along the shores of the Heiliger Lake. It was designed in a Neoclassical style in the late 1700s and remained as the home of royalty until the early 20th century. Today the palace serves as a museum and is open to the public. Visitors can explore the interiors and see early classical furniture and detailed arches, which have different designs in almost every room.The Marble Palace also has several marble fireplaces and ancient sculptures that were obtained from Italy. Local trees were used for creating the high quality wood floors and other detailed aspects of the palace. Some of the walls are covered in fine silks. Other impressive items on display here include two grandfather clocks and an extensive collection of ceramic vases.

Learn More