Explore France

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

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Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

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Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

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Audio Guides

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Water & Amusement Parks

Disneyland® Park

Disneyland Paris doesn’t need any introduction and the Disneyland Park is the largest and most visited of its two theme parks, drawing millions of annual visitors. This is where storybook world of Disney® is brought to life, with fairytale castles, swashbuckling pirates and iconic characters around every corner. As well as enjoying meet-and-greets with everyone from Mickey Mouse to Cinderella, visitors can get their adrenaline pumping on death-defying rollercoasters, ride the Disneyland Railroad and watch spectacular parades and shows.There are five themed areas of the Disneyland Park - Main Street USA, Frontierland, Adventureland, Fantasyland and Discoveryland – and highlights include Big Thunder Mountain and Space Mountain: Mission 2, Buzz Lightyear Laser Blast and Pirates of the Caribbean, as well as rides aimed at younger children, like the Mad Hatter's Tea Cups and Peter Pan’s flight.Disneyland© Paris

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See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

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Bus Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

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Places of Natural Beauty

Garonne River

The Garonne River starts in the Aran Valley in Spain, way up in the Pyrenees, and then heads north until it meets the Atlantic near Bordeaux. Although this means that the river “hangs a left” just above Toulouse to do so, it's where the river meets up with the southern canal system heading southeast that has made the Garonne so important. That's because this connection runs straight to the Mediterranean – in other words, it's like the Panama Canal of Europe, taking goods from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean without having to go through the Strait of Gibraltar.Both Bordeaux and Toulouse are on the Garonne, which plays an important role in both cities, as a location for events and leisure, as well as for barges and boats. In Toulouse in particular, the riverside has lots of open public green spaces that feature everything from outdoor art installations to a skate park.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Pic St-Loup

At just 658 meters high, it might be surprising to learn that Pic St-Loup is one of the most beloved emblems of the city of Montpellier. After all, the Alps are not that far away. But thanks to low vegetation, impressive 300-meter-high cliffs, and a surrounding relief of just 150 meters, Pic St-Loup is very prominent and can be seen from just about everywhere in the Hérault department. It is, by definition, part of the lower end of Massif Central.Because of its micro-climate and unique flora, the mountain is a protected site and houses a thriving population of prey birds. The mountain is a very popular day trip from Montpellier for both curious tourists and serious hikers; there is an old chapel, castle ruins, a hermitage, and a symbolic cross atop the mountain. Not to mention the unobstructed panoramas, which stretch all the way from the Mediterranean Sea to the south to the Cevennes Mountains to the north.

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Sights & Landmarks

Mt. Boron (Mont Boron)

Rising above the port in Nice is Mont Boron, a green wilderness with great views over Nice and beyond.From Mont Boron you can see over the port of Nice, Nice town and to Villefranche and Cap Ferrat. From this height you it’s easy to understand why this coastline is called the Cote d’Azur - the blue of the sea is simply amazing.Since 1860, Mont Boron has been preserved as a nature retreat with trees native to the Mediterranean, including Holm Oak and Aleppo Pine. With 6 miles (11 km) of sign-posted trails, this has become a popular place for both locals and visitors to escape the narrow streets of the city and take in the fresh air. It's also good for mountain biking. You can catch the bus (number 14) to the top of Mont Boron and then walk back down.Nearby Mont Albon has a 16th century military fort perched 720 feet (220m) above the sea. From here you get 360-degree views of the surrounding coastline and the Alpes-Maritimes.

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Wildlife & Zoos

Camargue

Visitors to Provence understandably concentrate on Avignon, Arles, and the charming towns, villages and vineyards in the region. And if you stick to that, you'll have a great time! But just as understandable is that while beautiful, these towns can all seem to blend together after a while. If that's the case, then you should head to the Camargue.Located in the southwest corner of Provence, the Camargue is a stretch of wetlands that also include salt fields and rice paddies as well as vineyards. The main town and jumping-off point for exploring the Camargue is Aigues-Mortes, a medieval walled town that is a great lunchtime spot – and you'll want to fuel up, as the Camargue is largely untouched.Although it is protected land, there are pockets of population that tend to the lands and work hard to protect its pristine geographical features. These include the famous wild horses of the Camargue, white horses largely allowed to roam free, although French cowboys.

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Gardens & Parks

Calanques National Park (Parc National des Calanques)

Calanques National Park (Parc national des Calanques) sits in the south of France between Marseille and Cassis. The area boasts dramatic rocky inlets, azure waters and pebble beaches, making it a popular destination for tourists looking to hike, swim and sail.The park is relatively large and composed of nearly 20 acres (8,500 hectares) by land and more than 100 acres (42,000 hectares) by sea. Visitors can spend their time keeping an eye out for some of the 140 land animal species and 60 marine species that live here. These creatures are protected in the park, which is the only one in Europe to contain land, marine and semi-urban areas. The calanques themselves are also main attractions and include Calanque de Sormiou, Calanque de Morgiou, Calanque d'En-Vau, Calanque de Port-Pin and Calanque de Sugiton.

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Geological Formations

Cap Canaille

Soaring 394 meters over the beaches of Cassis, Cape Canaille is France’s highest sea cliff and it’s a dramatic sight, with its steep grey and ochre colored cliffs jutting out into the ocean. Located between La Citotat and Cassis on the Mediterranean coast, the rugged headland has long drawn visitors from both towns, and offers spectacular views that span the glittering Cote d’Azur, the Calanques and the Gulf of Cassis.The easiest way to take in the views is to follow the 15km ‘Route des Crêtes’, a dizzying serpentine road that curls its way along the coastal cliffs and climbs to the highest point – head there at sunrise or sunset for the most breathtaking views. Alternatively, adventurous travelers will find ample opportunities for hiking, mountain biking and rock climbing.

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Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

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Classes & Workshops

Tickets & Passes

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City Tours

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Religious Architecture

Chapelle Expiatoire

With its somber neoclassical façade framed by rows of white rose bushes and capped with a striking green dome, the Chapelle Expiatoire has a timeless elegance befitting its origins. The little-visited landmark is one of Paris’ most significant chapels – built in 1826 to mark the location of the former Madeleine Cemetery, where King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were originally buried after their untimely executions during the French Revolution.The iconic royals are now buried at the Saint Denis Basilica, but the chapel stands as a poignant reminder of the victims of the French Revolution, commissioned by King Louis XVIII to honor his brother and sister-in-law. The work of architect Pierre-Léonard Fontaine, the Chapelle Expiatoire is renowned for its unique architecture and elaborate interiors, which include white marble sculptures of the King and Queen, and an exquisite altar that marks the exact site of Louis XVI’s burial.

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Buildings & Structure

Obelisk of Luxor

A 75-foot monumental pillar fashioned from pink granite, the Obelisk of Luxor looms over Place de la Concorde, Paris’ largest and most famous square, flanked by the idyllic Jardin des Tuileries. Erected in 1836, the monument was gifted to King Charles X by the Viceroy of Egypt, one of the twin obelisks marking the entrance to the Temple of Luxor (its double remains seated at the temple entrance). Following the turbulence and bloodshed of the French Revolution, the Obelisk was erected in Place de la Concorde as a symbol of peace, replacing the former statue of Louis XV that was famously substituted for a guillotine during the uprisings and effectively erasing some of the square’s gruesome history.Framed by fountains, the Luxor Obelisk, often-nicknamed Cleopatra’s Needle, is reminiscent of ancient Egyptian obelisks later exhumed in London and New York, and features original hieroglyphic tributes to the pharaoh Ramses II.

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Sights & Landmarks

Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery

What were once dugouts for battalion headquarters, today serves as one of the largest historical cemeteries in the region. The Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery contains some 7,655 burials from World War I, and according to experts, nearly half of these remain unidentified. The cemetery includes roughly 7,000 graves from those who died while at war in Arras, as well as a handful from burial grounds in Nod Pas-de-Calais, but nearly 50 Canadians who died during the Battle of Vimy Ridge are also laid to rest here. In early 2000, Canada exhumed a body from one such grave and laid him to rest in Ottawa, where he now memorializes all lost soldiers.

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Museums & Exhibitions

André Malraux Museum of Modern Art (MuMa)

Home to one of France’s most significant collections of impressionist paintings (the second-largest, after the Orsay Museum in Paris), the Musee des Beaux Arts Andre Malraux, or the MuMa, has long been an important destination for art lovers. Inaugurated in 1961, the museum takes its name from André Malraux, the Minister of Culture at the time, and features a slick modernist façade looking out over the coast of Le Havre.Highlights of the MuMa’s extensive permanent collection include the world’s largest collection of works by Boudin; an old masters area including works by Luca Giordano and José de Ribera; and modern works by Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, Raoul Dufy and more. Of course, it’s the impressionists that draw the most attention, and it’s a vast and varied collection, featuring works by Monet, Delacroix, Degas, Renoir, Manet, Gauguin and Vuillard.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Hospices de Beaune

Also known as Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune to locals, the Beaune Hospices used to be an almshouse in the 15th century and was used as a hospital for the poor people of the region recovering from the Hundred Years’ War. It was actually used as a fully functioning hospital until the late 1970s; it now houses a museum and a major charity wine auction every November.The building itself is now regarded as one of the finest architectural gems in France; it was designed by the Flemish architect Jacques Wiscrère, which explains the striking resemblances to architecture typically found in the Flanders region of Belgium. The hospices’ façade is an exceptional example of Northern Renaissance architecture and features an abundance of panel painting, long half-timber galleries and, of course, the signature gabled roof and its multi-colored and geometric tiles. There are also plenty of ironworks, carvings, and tapestries inside the hospices’ walls.

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Buildings & Structure

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial

Located at the foot of the hill where the infamously fierce Battle of Belleau Wood was fought in World War I, the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial overlooks the Marne Valley and is dedicated to the memory of lost soldiers. It was designed by famed French-American architect Paul Cret, who also planned several war memorials and battlefield monuments across Europe and in the United States. At 42 acres, it is one of the most important American cemeteries and memorials in France and commemorates the sacrifices and achievements of fighting men in the region, as well as the cooperation of French and American forces during World War I. Because of the role the US marines played in the battle, the Aisne-Marne Cemetery is often considered to be a pilgrimage site for American soldiers on leave. It features a T-shaped cemetery and a memorial chapel, which is built on top of a small hill, directly over the front-line trenches dug during the battle.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Belleau Wood

The Battle of Belleau Wood saw the U.S. forces recapture the woods on the Metz-Paris road around Chateau-Thierry, taken at the end of May by the German Seventh Army forces. The June 1918 Battle of Belleau Wood was quite significant for the American Army, which often refers to this battle as a key component of the United States Marine Corps’ lore and dedication; the soldiers, led by General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing, held off a critical sector of the final German offensive, teaming up with the French and British forces to stop the advances that would eventually lead to the German Empire’s recognition of the Armistice of November 11—one of the first actions of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe.Once the site of a fierce battle that caused substantial casualties, Belleau Wood is now home to a vast memorial in honor of the three-week long action. In the center of the road leading to the woods is a flagpole and a monument.

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Sights & Landmarks

Montmartre Cemetery

Officially known as Cimitière du Nord, the 19th-century Montmartre Cemetery is the third-largest necropolis in Paris, and the final resting place for many of Montmartre's famous artists and writers including Edgar Degas and Jacques Offenbach, Dumas, Hector Berlioz and Emile Zola's family.Built in the early 19th century in an abandoned gypsum quarry at the foot of Butte Montmartre, Montmartre Cemetery was intended to take the strain off the inner-city cemeteries reaching dangerous levels of overcrowding. Today, the 25-acre site is a peaceful place crisscrossed by cobbled lanes shaded by cedars, maples, chestnuts, and limes. You can spend about an hour seeing the tombs with their ornate designs.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Museum of the Legion of Honor (Musée de la Légion d'Honneur)

Steps from the Musée d'Orsay, the Musee de la Legion d'honneur (National Museum of the Legion of Honour) recognizes the history of the Legion of Honor through an impressive display of ceremonial and military medals, royal jewelry, and robes. Dedicated to military leaders from France and abroad, you'll see oil paintings of the likes of Napoleon and Patton. And as you wander the rooms of the Museum of the Legion of Honor, you'll also get see interesting collectibles like ribbons and honor pins from around the world.Housed in an elegant mansion in St-Germain-des-Prés, at the Musee de la Legion d'honneur you can also see video tributes to the likes of US general and Légion member Dwight Eisenhower.

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Religious Architecture

Lisieux Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Pierre)

With its grand Gothic façade overlooking the central Place François Mitterrand, it’s impossible to miss the Lisieux Cathedral, or Cathedral Saint-Pierre. Built on the site of a former Roman church, the cathedral dates back to the 12th century and is one of the earliest examples of Gothic design in France, now preserved as a National Monument. Along with its notable architecture, Lisieux Cathedral is also famous as the resting place of Bishop Cauchon, who famously oversaw the prosecution of Joan of Arc.

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Religious Architecture

Chartres Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres)

The Chartres Cathedral, known in French as the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres, is an incredibly well-preserved UNESCO World Heritage-listed cathedral from the 12th century. Considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture, this historic church features heavy flying buttresses and imposing spires, as well as stained-glass windows that are considered the most complete and best preserved of their kind.Religious pilgrims have long come from every corner of the globe to see the tunic that Catholics believe the Virgin Mary wore when she gave birth to Jesus. Others come to walk the famous labyrinth embedded in the floor of the cathedral, whether in prayerful meditation or simply as an interesting activity. And the wall of statues around the choir are not to be missed, especially since they have recently been restored to their original glory.

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Sights & Landmarks

Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery

Just outside the Belgian border with France stands a First World War cemetery built by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission containing the graves of 250 British and Australian soldiers who died on July 19, 1916, in the Battle of Fromelles - a diversionary battle, which only occured in order to draw the attention of the Germans away from the larger attacks elsewhere in Somme. It involved units of the Australian 5th Division and the British 61st Division, but alas, the Germans were well-prepared and the British Empire troops suffered great losses. Dating back from just 2009, Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery was the first new Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery to be built in commemoration of World War I in over 50 years; the last such cemeteries having mostly been in remembrance of the Second World War.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Mémorial de la Shoah (Shoah Memorial)

Opened in 2005, the Shoah Memorial, or Memorial de la Shoah, is a museum located in the Marais, Paris’ 4th arrondissement, dedicated to the 76,000 French Jews deported from France to Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Honoring their memory through a series of poignant monuments and focusing on educating the public about the harrowing truths of the Holocaust, the museum is one of the country’s most moving tributes to its Jewish population.Exhibits are centered around a number of memorials including the moving Wall of Names, a series of tall stone plinths listing the names and dates of French Jews lost in the war. The Crypt, a huge Star of David carved out of black marble, is a symbolic tomb for the millions of unburied Jews, containing ashes recovered from the concentration camps, and the heartrending Children’s Memorial showcases eerily lit photographs of some of the 11,000 children murdered.

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Sights & Landmarks

La Cambe German War Cemetery

As the largest German WWII cemetery in France, the La Cambe German War Cemetery serves as a poignant reminder of the lives lost on both sides of the war. It’s a moving site, with its grey schist crosses and dark, flat headstones offering a more somber atmosphere than that of the American and Commonwealth cemeteries nearby.Although initially serving as a temporary American cemetery, today 21,222 soldiers from the German Armed Forces are buried at La Cambe. At the center of the cemetery, a 6-meter-high grassy hillock is capped with a single cross and serves as a mass grave for 296 soldiers, many of which are unknown. Just outside of the cemetery, the La Cambe Peace Garden opened in 1996, and is home to 1,200 maple trees, each planted by an individual or organization to symbolize reconciliation and lasting peace. A visitor center is also located at the entrance to the cemetery and offers further insight into the soldiers buried on-site.

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Buildings & Structure

Fontaine Saint-Michel

Fontaine Saint-Michel was sculpted by Gabriel Davioud in 1860 and gives its name to the square where it’s located, Place Saint-Michel. The monumental fountain, located between boulevard Saint-Michel and Place Saint-Andres-des-Arts was commissioned by Baron Georges-Eugene Haussmann as part of Napoleon III’s plans to bring more light and air to the city of Paris.The fountain depicts the archangel Michael vanquishing Satan, a controversial political symbol at the time hinting at Napoleon vanquishing the revolutionary fervor of the neighborhood. Unlike many of Paris’s fountains, Fontaine Saint-Michel was made from various colors of materials, including red and green marble, blue and yellow stone, and bronze. Place Saint-Michel is a popular meeting spot among both the city’s youth and foreign visitors.

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Sights & Landmarks

Pont de l'Alma (Alma Bridge)

Pont de l’Alma is a Parisian bridge built in 1854 in commemoration of the Franco-British alliance’s victory over the Russian army during the Crimean War. The bridge underwent complete rebuilding in the 1970s in order to accommodate the rapidly increasing road and river traffic – only the statues were retained from the original structure. The arch bridge is now 42 meters large and 153 meters long, and links the right and left banks of the Seine River.Pont de l’Alma offers splendid views of the Eiffel Tower and is often the go-to location for photographers wanting to capture Paris. What made the bridge a household name worldwide, however, is the role it played in Lady Diana’s death; indeed, she perished in a car crash at the entrance of the bridge’s tunnel in 1997. The Flame of Liberty at the bridge's north end has become an unofficial memorial to her memory.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Utah Beach D-Day Museum (Musée du Débarquement)

Omaha Beach, with its Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, receives the most visitors looking to learn more about WWII history and pay their respects. But what many don't know is that Utah Beach, the westernmost landing point of the D-Day battle, has its own fantastic museum. If you're planning an overnight stay in Bayeux in order to explore the various WWII sites in Normandy, the Utah Beach D-Day Museum should be right near the top of your list.Unlike the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which technically lies on U.S. soil, the Utah Beach D-Day Museum is a French endeavor, and as such it carries the official name of Musée du Débarquement Utah Beach – and its motto translates to, “Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom.” However, you can be sure that everything in the museum is titled in English, so no need to worry.

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Sights & Landmarks

Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery

The Juno Beach Center is Normandy's only Canadian museum, but there are two locations where Canada's heroes from the Battle of Normandy have been laid to rest: The Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, and the Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. The former honors soldiers from earlier in the battle – on and just after D-Day - while the former is for soldiers who gave their lives later on.Like many of Normandy's WWII battle sites and memorials, Bény-sur-Mer is about a half-hour from Bayeux, which many visitors make as their base from which to explore the region. Bretteville-sur-Laize is about 40 minutes away, just behind Caen. Both of them are considered in the “opposite” direction from most of the most important sites, and so can be ignored by those on a fast-track tour of Normandy. But both sites deserve to be given their due.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Cézanne's Studio (Atelier Cézanne)

Nestled in the hills above Aix-en-Provence, the Atlelier Cézanne, or the Cézanne Studio, is a museum devoted to the life and works of its namesake. The studio, the upper floor of a Provençal country house, was commissioned by the artist in 1902 and remained his place of work until his death in 1906, a tranquil retreat with a blooming garden and expansive views over the surrounding countryside.Since opening its doors in 1954, the museum has set to preserve the studio as left by Cézanne, with many of the artist’s personal effects and inspirational objects laid out around the room. Cézanne’s easel and paints lie in the spot where masterpieces like Les Grandes Baigneuses (The Large Bathers) and La Femme à la Cafétière (The Woman with the Coffee Pot) were created; elsewhere, vases, scarves and fruits are laid out into carefully construed still art creations.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Ardenne Abbey (Abbey d'Ardenne)

If you're traveling from Caen to Bayeux on your way to WWII sites, you may pass by a fairly new-looking church in the small village of Saint-Germain-la-Blanche-Herbe. Its aesthetic might seem old, sure, but its overall look is too new to be the original architecture. And after seeing so many beautiful old churches in France, it would be easy to pass by without giving it a second thought.But to WWII historians as well as those who are on the search for WWII sites of interest in Normandy, this church – the Ardenne Abbey – is high on the list of places to pay one's respects to the fallen heroes of WWII. It was here that the Germans made their headquarters during the Normandy battles of June 1944, and it's the site of one of the most egregious violations of the Geneva Convention from the war.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Airborne Museum (Musée Airborne)

The hallowed history of the D-Day landings on the beaches of Normandy draws thousands of visitors a year to this beautiful region of France. Along its now-calm coastline are tours, memorials, cemeteries, museums and stark reminders of the events of June 6, 1944. As you look out over the beaches and aided by the news reels from the time as well as modern-day recreations for the silver screen, it can be almost too easy to feel as though you can see exactly what happened, right in front of you.But not everyone who fought that day arrived by boat. In the wee hours that morning – in fact, just after midnight - American paratroopers started descending into the region. Through a series of unfortunate events the paratroopers were not able to rally in order to provide organized support for the coming attack, but their scattered arrival sent the Germans running in all directions to defend their hold, a move which ultimately was one of the many factors in the Allies' victory.

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Sights & Landmarks

Bayeux War Cemetery

The peaceful Bayeux War Cemetery is the largest of the 18 Commonwealth military cemeteries in Normandy. It contains 4,868 graves of soldiers from the UK and 10 other countries (including Germany, in contrast to the American cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer). Many of the soldiers buried here were never identified, and the headstones are simply marked 'A Soldier Known Unto God'. The bodies of 1,807 other Commonwealth soldiers were never found, and are commemorated on the memorial across the main road.Bayeux was liberated by the Allies in June 1944 and became the seat of government for France until Paris was liberated. In this time the British built the ring road to enable military vehicles to move around the city and established many military hospitals. Many of those buried in the cemetery are from those hospitals.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Hillman Fortress

With an impressive 18 underground bunkers linked by trenches and reinforced by barbed wire fences and minefields, the Hillman Fortress was once an important German WWII command post and the headquarters of the German 736th Regiment. Known as Hill 61 by the Germans and codenamed ‘Hillman’ by the British, the strategic bunker complex was attacked on 6 June 1944 as part of the D-Day Allied invasion and finally liberated by the Suffolk Regiment the following day.Today, the hilltop bunkers have been preserved as an open-air museum, run by volunteers, and visitors are free to explore the 24-hectare site, including the kitchen, bunkers, command posts and well. A memorial museum is also located on-site, where visitors can learn more about the Hillman Bunkers and the Suffolk Regiment.

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Religious Architecture

Bayeux Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Bayeux)

A National Monument of France and one of Bayeaux’s most eye-catching monuments, the Bayeux Cathedral (Cathedrale Notre Dame de Bayeux) is best known as the original home of the Bayeux Tapestry (now a UNESCO ‘Memory of the World’ and displayed at the nearby Bayeux Tapestry Museum). Originally built in the 11th-century, the cathedral’s Gothic façade was reconstructed in the 12th century, but much of the Romanesque-style interiors remain intact, shown off by atmospheric lighting during the evening hours.Consecrated in 1077 by Bishop Odo of Conteville in the presence of his brother and King of England, William the Conqueror, the cathedral’s strong English ties are portrayed in its vibrant frescos, which depict the life of Thomas Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and of course, the iconic Bayeux Tapestry, said to have been commissioned by the Bishop to decorate its nave.

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Art Galleries

Bayeux Tapestry (Tapisserie de Bayeux)

There are few 11th century artworks as famous as the legendary Bayeux Tapestry, which is so well known that it is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage ‘Memory of the World.’ Measuring almost 70 meters long, the elaborate tapestry features an epic 58 scenes, each carefully embroidered with colored wool yarns onto a linen backdrop. Originally made in England back in the 1070s, the artwork depicts historic scenes from the Norman conquest of England, ending in the infamous Battle of Hastings in 1066. Viking ships, Norman and Saxon cavalries, bloody battle scenes and images of King Edward and William the Conqueror are all brought to life on the tapestry, with each scene captioned in Latin.The tapestry, remarkably preserved despite being almost 1000 years old, has been on public display in the French Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux since 1983, becoming a hugely popular attraction for visitors from Normandy.

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Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

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Tickets & Passes

Skip the line Tickets

 

Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

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Extreme Sports

Top Attractions

Places of Natural Beauty

Calanque de Sormiou

The calanques are narrow and steep inlets along the limestone coast of southern France, the most impressive ones being located along the little stretch of coastline between Marseilles and Cassis. They are romantic, wild and, being surrounded by huge cliffs, often protrude fjord-like into the landscape. While many calanques require hours of hiking or kayaking to reach, the Calanque de Sormiou is more easily accessible and still provides a true visual spectacle for visitors.After a 15 minute drive or 45 minute walk from the main road down the hills, a sandy beach awaits next to the bright blue Mediterranean water. A couple weekend homes dot the landscape and then there is Le Château, the modest but immensely popular bouillabaisse restaurant that requires a phone reservation well ahead of time to snag a seat. As sparse as the landscape might appear, Sormiou actually serves as a habitat for a rich flora and fauna.

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Cosmetics & Beauty

Grasse Fragonard Perfumery (Parfumerie Fragonard)

Fragonard, one of the most well-known perfume factories, is named after an 18th-century French painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard. The rustic factory, dating back to 1782, is located in the heart of Old Town.A guide will show you the various processes and equipment used to make and package fragrance products. After the tour, you can explore the charming museum, which displays vintage perfume bottles and vases and highlights the acclaimed 3000 year old parfumerie industry. The gift shop sells Fragonard products, which are only available at Frangonard boutiques and through mail-order.

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Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

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Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

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Buildings & Structure

Château de Maisons (Château de Maisons-Laffitte)

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Seine and surrounded by the Saint-Germain forest, the grandiose Château de Maisons is a remarkable example of French baroque and classical architecture and is renowned as one of the most important of its era. Built in the 17th-century for René de Longueil and often used as a hunting lodge by Louis XIV, the residence was designed by royal architect François Mansart and inspired the much-celebrated chateaux of Vaux-le-Vicomte and Versailles.Today, the chateau is preserved as a National Historic Monument and visitors can explore its opulent interiors, including the grand open staircase, the King's apartments and the Comte d'Artois' dining room. Additional highlights include the landscaped gardens and castle grounds, and a museum devoted to the history of horse racing, which began in the region.

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Buildings & Structure

Château du Haut-Koenigsbourg

Towering a half-mile (757 meters) over the Alsace Plain, the striking pink sandstone towers of High Koenigsbourg Castle (Château du Haut-Koenigsbourg) are an unmissable sight, and the fairytale fortress is among the most popular attractions of the famous Alsace Wine Route. Although originally built in the 12th century for the German Hohenzollern family, the majority of the current castle dates back to the 19th century, when it was extensively renovated by Prussian Emperor William II.As well as admiring the romantic spires and richly decorated façade from up close, the highlight of a visit to High Koenigsbourg Castle is the impressive view from the hilltop, spanning over the surrounding Vosges Mountains, Germany’s Black Forest region and as far as the Swiss Alps on a clear day. Tours of the castle interiors are also available, where visitors can explore the windmill, wine cellars, living quarters and medieval gardens.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Au Lapin Agile

One of Paris’s most beloved cabarets, Au Lapin Agile has been delighting audiences in Montmartre for decades. The title translates to “The Nimble Rabbit” from French, originating from a painting of a rabbit jumping out of a hot frying pan. The small theater was once a hotspot for bohemian Parisian artists such as Picasso, Modigliani, Toulouse-Latrec, and Utrillo. Picasso helped to make the space famous with his 1905 painting of “At the Lapin Agile.”The iconic pink cottage cabaret drew in some of Paris’s most eccentric characters, many of which carved their names into the original wooden tables that still remain today. Having opened in 1860, the Paris institution has long been a source of evening revelry, good food and drink, and French song and dance performance. It continues to be an authentic venue for all three today.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Grand Theatre

Bordeaux's Grand Theatre was built in the late 1700s during the reign of Louis XVI by architect Victor Louis. It is one of the most beautiful 18th-century concert halls in the world, with a facade adorned with 12 Corinthian columns, each topped with a statue. Nine statues represent the art muses, and the other three represent the Roman goddesses Juno, Venus and Minerva. Over the past few years, the theater has gone through restoration to repair damages from oil lamps and revive the 18th-century decor.On three separate occasions the theater was the seat of the French parliament. In effect this made Bordeaux the capital of France in 1870, 1914, and 1941. Today the Grand Theatre is home to the Orchestre National Bordeaux Aquitaine, the Opera Ballet of Bordeaux, and the Chorus of the Opéra National de Bordeaux.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Quarries of Lights (Carrières de Lumières)

Located in the dreamy, medieval and semi-ruined Provençal village of Les Baux-de-Provence in the Alpilles Natural Regional Park, the Carrières de Lumières is a multi-media attraction featuring the works of world-famous artists such as Klimt, Gauguin and Van Gogh. Making use of a former quarry with huge, bare galleries held up by massive columns, art-based images are projected onto the surrounding rock accompanied by stirring music in an amazing son et lumière show that lasts for 40 minutes. The current show (due to end in January 2016) features the spectacular works of Italian Renaissance artists Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael in a totally immersive experience backed by the use of numerous video projectors and 3D audio. In between shows, the quarry walls are illuminated with ever-changing colors to reveal glittering minerals in the walls.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Théâtre des Nouveautés

Sitting in Paris’s theater district on the southern edges of Montmartre, the Théâtre des Nouveautés (literally the ‘theater of the new’) opened in 1921 and features a plush scarlet-and-gold auditorium with seating for 585. Designed by architect Adolf Tiers, this is the fourth Parisian theater to bear the same name, the first opening in 1827 on Salle de la Bourse to host comic operas and satirical plays. Today the newest incarnation of the Nouveautés is still pulling in the crowds under stewardship of French producer Pascal Legros, while maintaining the tradition of putting on light comedy and vaudeville farces alongside works by Ionesco and satirical shows. The theater is also home to the wildly successful one-man – and English-speaking – show by French comedian Olivier Giraud, who takes a fly look at ‘How to be a Parisian in One Hour’.

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Fun & Games

Printemps

Printemps is a major luxury department store in Paris with 25 floors located in three different buildings. The shopping center has more than 470,000 square feet dedicated to luxury goods, glamour, and fashion, as well as home goods, beauty products, and more. You'll find French and international brands here, including over 300 brands that are sold exclusively at Printemps. There is also a food hall with the biggest brands in luxury gastronomy, plus an eating area where you can stop for a meal while you shop.Aside from shopping, Printemps is worth visiting to see the impressive building. It has a huge art deco cupola, a Haussmannian facade, a panoramic terrace with views of Paris, and artistic window displays. The facade was registered as a Historic Monument in 1975. Though the shopping center is proud of its heritage and history, it strives to keep up the tradition of a modern image and experience.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Royal Opera of Versailles (L'Opéra Royal du Château de Versailles)

Recently renovated to its original splendor, the Royal Opera at Versailles is fit for a king, and one can imagine the spectacles performed here over the centuries. But its history is a bit rockier than you might expect from a monarchy.Louis XIV was the first to conceive of the idea of a dedicated performance space for royal performances in the late 17th century, but the ensuing historic troubles that plagued the monarchy meant that Louis XV put a stop to its construction. But that doesn't mean there were no shows at the palace. Instead, for every concert and performance, an entire theater was built from scratch and then dismantled. Finally, faced with the spectacle that would be the wedding of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, the Dauphin's grandfather completed construction and is the Royal Opera house we know today.

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Buildings & Structure

Palais de Justice

Located on one of Paris’ two natural islands in the Seine river, the Palais de Justice is among the oldest surviving buildings of the former royal palace. The middle of three impressive buildings on the Île de la Cité (the other two are the medieval Gothic chapel Sainte Chapelle and the former prison the Conciergerie, which is now a museum), the Palais de Justice is notorious for its role during the French revolution, where more than 1,000 people (including Marie-Antoinette) were condemned to death before being imprisoned at the Conciergerie next door and executed on the guillotine.Because the Palais is still used for judicial purposes today, visitors are not allowed to tour the premises. However, touring the Conciergerie and Sainte Chapelle is a great way to check out the Palais de Justice from the outside. Sainte Chapelle has an impressive collection of stained glass windows, and provides the closest look of the Palais de Justice available to the general public.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Palais Royal

It's easy to pass by the Palais-Royal in Paris's first arrondissement; there is so much around it of note, and visitors are either rushing past to get to the Louvre, or wiped out after an afternoon at that world-famous museum. But its gardens, which are free and open to the public, are an oasis in this otherwise tourist-heavy neighborhood that's practically hidden in plain sight – so keep it in mind when you want to take a load off after trekking through the Louvre.Originally the home of Cardinal Richelieu, it was built in the 1630s and after the Cardinal's death fell into the hands of King Louis XIII. Today it is the location of the Ministry of Culture and a branch of the National Library.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Château de Chantilly

One of the most fabulous of France’s extravagant stately homes, moated Chantilly is 40 km (25 miles) north of Paris. Building work began on a mansion suitable for the aristocratic Montmorency clan in the late 15th century and over the centuries Chantilly has also been home to the wealthy Orléans, Condé and Coutts dynasties. Construction on the present Petit Château started in the 1560s, while a second palace was largely destroyed in the 10-year French Revolution, which ended in 1799.Today’s sumptuous neo-Renaissance replacement was created by architect Honoré Daumet at the behest of Henri d’Orléans, Duke of Aumale, who dreamed of creating the most splendid private residence in France. With suite after suite of opulently adorned apartments to admire, Chantilly is also home of the Musée Condé, which displays a fine collection of 15th- and 16th-century paintings from the likes of Raphael, Eugène Delacroix and Théodore Géricault.

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Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

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Wine Tastings

Lunch Cruises

Dinner Cruises

Street Food Tours

Top Attractions

Winery

Chateau Font du Broc

Built on the Var heights between Esterel and the Gulf of St Tropez, the Château Font du Broc is set amid lush vegetation overlooking the sea. The grounds of this impressive wine farm are sprawled out over 250 acres that encompass vineyards and olive trees – and even an Olympic-sized arena for horses.Producing both wine and olive oil, the owner of Château Font du Broc, Sylvain Massa, insists on organic and traditional farming methods and restricts the volume of wine produced in order to ensure its quality. Although the beautiful surroundings and the building’s architecture are high points for some visitors to Château Font du Broc, for others it’s simply all about sampling the delicious wines. The tasting room welcomes visitors and sampling the local vintage is positively encouraged, either on its own or with locally produced cheeses, meats and other delicacies.

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Winery

Château Margaux

Found in the sandy flatlands of the Médoc region in southwest France, Château Margaux is today known for producing some of the finest – and most expensive – Premier Grand Cru Classé Bordeaux wines in the world. Unusually for Bordeaux, the Margaux estate produces whites as well as rich, spicy world-renowned reds, and sells around 30,000 cases per year. All Margaux wines are produced organically and the average age of the vines is 36 years old, forming from a mixture of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc grapes.Although wines have been produced on the estate since the 1580s, it was confiscated from its aristocratic owners in the French Revolution of 1789–99 and its fortunes were only revived with the advent of the Marquis de la Colonilla in 1810. He built the elegant Palladian mansion, to a design by Louis Combes, which still stands at the heart of the estate.

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European

Kamerzell House (Maison Kammerzell)

One of Strasbourg’s oldest and most famous buildings, the Maison Kammerzell (Kammerzell House) is a remarkably preserved example of medieval architecture, and its traditional timber framing and ornate carvings make it a popular subject of tourist photographs. Although originally built in 1427, the house owes much of its modern-day appearance to renovations undertaken in the 16th. It also takes its name from its 19th-century owner, grocer Philippe Kammerzell.Today, the Kammerzell House is home to a period-style hotel and restaurant, and makes an atmospheric dining venue, with its authentic décor including vaulted ceilings, arched stained-glass windows and a series of elaborate frescos by early 20th-century painter Leo Schnug.

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France

25 Featured Attractions

Religious Architecture

Chapelle Expiatoire

With its somber neoclassical façade framed by rows of white rose bushes and capped with a striking green dome, the Chapelle Expiatoire has a timeless elegance befitting its origins. The little-visited landmark is one of Paris’ most significant chapels – built in 1826 to mark the location of the former Madeleine Cemetery, where King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were originally buried after their untimely executions during the French Revolution.The iconic royals are now buried at the Saint Denis Basilica, but the chapel stands as a poignant reminder of the victims of the French Revolution, commissioned by King Louis XVIII to honor his brother and sister-in-law. The work of architect Pierre-Léonard Fontaine, the Chapelle Expiatoire is renowned for its unique architecture and elaborate interiors, which include white marble sculptures of the King and Queen, and an exquisite altar that marks the exact site of Louis XVI’s burial.

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Buildings & Structure

Obelisk of Luxor

A 75-foot monumental pillar fashioned from pink granite, the Obelisk of Luxor looms over Place de la Concorde, Paris’ largest and most famous square, flanked by the idyllic Jardin des Tuileries. Erected in 1836, the monument was gifted to King Charles X by the Viceroy of Egypt, one of the twin obelisks marking the entrance to the Temple of Luxor (its double remains seated at the temple entrance). Following the turbulence and bloodshed of the French Revolution, the Obelisk was erected in Place de la Concorde as a symbol of peace, replacing the former statue of Louis XV that was famously substituted for a guillotine during the uprisings and effectively erasing some of the square’s gruesome history.Framed by fountains, the Luxor Obelisk, often-nicknamed Cleopatra’s Needle, is reminiscent of ancient Egyptian obelisks later exhumed in London and New York, and features original hieroglyphic tributes to the pharaoh Ramses II.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Garonne River

The Garonne River starts in the Aran Valley in Spain, way up in the Pyrenees, and then heads north until it meets the Atlantic near Bordeaux. Although this means that the river “hangs a left” just above Toulouse to do so, it's where the river meets up with the southern canal system heading southeast that has made the Garonne so important. That's because this connection runs straight to the Mediterranean – in other words, it's like the Panama Canal of Europe, taking goods from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean without having to go through the Strait of Gibraltar.Both Bordeaux and Toulouse are on the Garonne, which plays an important role in both cities, as a location for events and leisure, as well as for barges and boats. In Toulouse in particular, the riverside has lots of open public green spaces that feature everything from outdoor art installations to a skate park.

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Sights & Landmarks

Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery

What were once dugouts for battalion headquarters, today serves as one of the largest historical cemeteries in the region. The Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery contains some 7,655 burials from World War I, and according to experts, nearly half of these remain unidentified. The cemetery includes roughly 7,000 graves from those who died while at war in Arras, as well as a handful from burial grounds in Nod Pas-de-Calais, but nearly 50 Canadians who died during the Battle of Vimy Ridge are also laid to rest here. In early 2000, Canada exhumed a body from one such grave and laid him to rest in Ottawa, where he now memorializes all lost soldiers.

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Museums & Exhibitions

André Malraux Museum of Modern Art (MuMa)

Home to one of France’s most significant collections of impressionist paintings (the second-largest, after the Orsay Museum in Paris), the Musee des Beaux Arts Andre Malraux, or the MuMa, has long been an important destination for art lovers. Inaugurated in 1961, the museum takes its name from André Malraux, the Minister of Culture at the time, and features a slick modernist façade looking out over the coast of Le Havre.Highlights of the MuMa’s extensive permanent collection include the world’s largest collection of works by Boudin; an old masters area including works by Luca Giordano and José de Ribera; and modern works by Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, Raoul Dufy and more. Of course, it’s the impressionists that draw the most attention, and it’s a vast and varied collection, featuring works by Monet, Delacroix, Degas, Renoir, Manet, Gauguin and Vuillard.

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Buildings & Structure

Château de Maisons (Château de Maisons-Laffitte)

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Seine and surrounded by the Saint-Germain forest, the grandiose Château de Maisons is a remarkable example of French baroque and classical architecture and is renowned as one of the most important of its era. Built in the 17th-century for René de Longueil and often used as a hunting lodge by Louis XIV, the residence was designed by royal architect François Mansart and inspired the much-celebrated chateaux of Vaux-le-Vicomte and Versailles.Today, the chateau is preserved as a National Historic Monument and visitors can explore its opulent interiors, including the grand open staircase, the King's apartments and the Comte d'Artois' dining room. Additional highlights include the landscaped gardens and castle grounds, and a museum devoted to the history of horse racing, which began in the region.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Hospices de Beaune

Also known as Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune to locals, the Beaune Hospices used to be an almshouse in the 15th century and was used as a hospital for the poor people of the region recovering from the Hundred Years’ War. It was actually used as a fully functioning hospital until the late 1970s; it now houses a museum and a major charity wine auction every November.The building itself is now regarded as one of the finest architectural gems in France; it was designed by the Flemish architect Jacques Wiscrère, which explains the striking resemblances to architecture typically found in the Flanders region of Belgium. The hospices’ façade is an exceptional example of Northern Renaissance architecture and features an abundance of panel painting, long half-timber galleries and, of course, the signature gabled roof and its multi-colored and geometric tiles. There are also plenty of ironworks, carvings, and tapestries inside the hospices’ walls.

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Buildings & Structure

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial

Located at the foot of the hill where the infamously fierce Battle of Belleau Wood was fought in World War I, the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial overlooks the Marne Valley and is dedicated to the memory of lost soldiers. It was designed by famed French-American architect Paul Cret, who also planned several war memorials and battlefield monuments across Europe and in the United States. At 42 acres, it is one of the most important American cemeteries and memorials in France and commemorates the sacrifices and achievements of fighting men in the region, as well as the cooperation of French and American forces during World War I. Because of the role the US marines played in the battle, the Aisne-Marne Cemetery is often considered to be a pilgrimage site for American soldiers on leave. It features a T-shaped cemetery and a memorial chapel, which is built on top of a small hill, directly over the front-line trenches dug during the battle.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Belleau Wood

The Battle of Belleau Wood saw the U.S. forces recapture the woods on the Metz-Paris road around Chateau-Thierry, taken at the end of May by the German Seventh Army forces. The June 1918 Battle of Belleau Wood was quite significant for the American Army, which often refers to this battle as a key component of the United States Marine Corps’ lore and dedication; the soldiers, led by General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing, held off a critical sector of the final German offensive, teaming up with the French and British forces to stop the advances that would eventually lead to the German Empire’s recognition of the Armistice of November 11—one of the first actions of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe.Once the site of a fierce battle that caused substantial casualties, Belleau Wood is now home to a vast memorial in honor of the three-week long action. In the center of the road leading to the woods is a flagpole and a monument.

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Sights & Landmarks

Montmartre Cemetery

Officially known as Cimitière du Nord, the 19th-century Montmartre Cemetery is the third-largest necropolis in Paris, and the final resting place for many of Montmartre's famous artists and writers including Edgar Degas and Jacques Offenbach, Dumas, Hector Berlioz and Emile Zola's family.Built in the early 19th century in an abandoned gypsum quarry at the foot of Butte Montmartre, Montmartre Cemetery was intended to take the strain off the inner-city cemeteries reaching dangerous levels of overcrowding. Today, the 25-acre site is a peaceful place crisscrossed by cobbled lanes shaded by cedars, maples, chestnuts, and limes. You can spend about an hour seeing the tombs with their ornate designs.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Museum of the Legion of Honor (Musée de la Légion d'Honneur)

Steps from the Musée d'Orsay, the Musee de la Legion d'honneur (National Museum of the Legion of Honour) recognizes the history of the Legion of Honor through an impressive display of ceremonial and military medals, royal jewelry, and robes. Dedicated to military leaders from France and abroad, you'll see oil paintings of the likes of Napoleon and Patton. And as you wander the rooms of the Museum of the Legion of Honor, you'll also get see interesting collectibles like ribbons and honor pins from around the world.Housed in an elegant mansion in St-Germain-des-Prés, at the Musee de la Legion d'honneur you can also see video tributes to the likes of US general and Légion member Dwight Eisenhower.

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Religious Architecture

Lisieux Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Pierre)

With its grand Gothic façade overlooking the central Place François Mitterrand, it’s impossible to miss the Lisieux Cathedral, or Cathedral Saint-Pierre. Built on the site of a former Roman church, the cathedral dates back to the 12th century and is one of the earliest examples of Gothic design in France, now preserved as a National Monument. Along with its notable architecture, Lisieux Cathedral is also famous as the resting place of Bishop Cauchon, who famously oversaw the prosecution of Joan of Arc.

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Scenic Landmarks

Cote d'Albatre

A worthy rival to England’s famous White Cliffs of Dover, France’s Côte d'Albâtre (Alabaster Coast) is an equally dramatic sight – a spectacular stretch of white chalk cliffs overlooking the English Channel. Running for around 80 miles (130km) along the north coast of Normandy, the striking cliffs and pebbly coves have long inspired artists, composers and photographers, appearing in the works of impressionist artists like Monet, Pissarro and Renoir. Classified as a Natura 2000 site in 2009, the protected coastline is also a popular recreational area with winds perfect for sailing, windsurfing and kite surfing. A network of hiking and cycling trails also follow the cliff top, including the long-distance GR21 hiking route, which runs all the way from Le Havre to Le Tréport.

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Religious Architecture

Chartres Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres)

The Chartres Cathedral, known in French as the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres, is an incredibly well-preserved UNESCO World Heritage-listed cathedral from the 12th century. Considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture, this historic church features heavy flying buttresses and imposing spires, as well as stained-glass windows that are considered the most complete and best preserved of their kind.Religious pilgrims have long come from every corner of the globe to see the tunic that Catholics believe the Virgin Mary wore when she gave birth to Jesus. Others come to walk the famous labyrinth embedded in the floor of the cathedral, whether in prayerful meditation or simply as an interesting activity. And the wall of statues around the choir are not to be missed, especially since they have recently been restored to their original glory.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Tours Old Town

The old city center of Tours, called Old Town (Vieux Tours), is one of medieval-era winding streets, quaint shops, a bustling square (Place Pumereau) with cafes and restaurants and half-timbered homes that date back to the 14th century. With so much to see here, it's a wonder that the city had at one point slated to tear it all down in favor of a grid street system!Don't miss the St Gatien Cathedral, the weekly market in Place Jean Jaurès or the garden of the Musée des Beaux-Arts. This is where a cedar tree planted by Napoleon Bonaparte sits, as well as a bizarre stuffed elephant from the 1903 circus that came through town.

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Winery

Chateau Font du Broc

Built on the Var heights between Esterel and the Gulf of St Tropez, the Château Font du Broc is set amid lush vegetation overlooking the sea. The grounds of this impressive wine farm are sprawled out over 250 acres that encompass vineyards and olive trees – and even an Olympic-sized arena for horses.Producing both wine and olive oil, the owner of Château Font du Broc, Sylvain Massa, insists on organic and traditional farming methods and restricts the volume of wine produced in order to ensure its quality. Although the beautiful surroundings and the building’s architecture are high points for some visitors to Château Font du Broc, for others it’s simply all about sampling the delicious wines. The tasting room welcomes visitors and sampling the local vintage is positively encouraged, either on its own or with locally produced cheeses, meats and other delicacies.

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Sights & Landmarks

Pozieres

Pozieres is a small village in rural France that was the setting of a two-week confrontation during the Battles of Somme of World War I. It is where, between March and April 1918, the German Fifth Army was driven further out into the fields of Somme by overwhelmingly large numbers of British corps that were on a mission to compromise the nearby German bastion of Thiepval. Although it technically involved the British Empire, Pozières is really an Australian battle - seeing as it involved over 23,000 corps and that the Australian flag flies over several buildings in recognition of the sacrifice of the ANZACs – even though the cemetery does not bare any Australian names; instead, Australian soldiers who fell in France and whose graves are not known are commemorated at the National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux.

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Sights & Landmarks

Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery

Just outside the Belgian border with France stands a First World War cemetery built by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission containing the graves of 250 British and Australian soldiers who died on July 19, 1916, in the Battle of Fromelles - a diversionary battle, which only occured in order to draw the attention of the Germans away from the larger attacks elsewhere in Somme. It involved units of the Australian 5th Division and the British 61st Division, but alas, the Germans were well-prepared and the British Empire troops suffered great losses. Dating back from just 2009, Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery was the first new Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery to be built in commemoration of World War I in over 50 years; the last such cemeteries having mostly been in remembrance of the Second World War.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Mémorial de la Shoah (Shoah Memorial)

Opened in 2005, the Shoah Memorial, or Memorial de la Shoah, is a museum located in the Marais, Paris’ 4th arrondissement, dedicated to the 76,000 French Jews deported from France to Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Honoring their memory through a series of poignant monuments and focusing on educating the public about the harrowing truths of the Holocaust, the museum is one of the country’s most moving tributes to its Jewish population.Exhibits are centered around a number of memorials including the moving Wall of Names, a series of tall stone plinths listing the names and dates of French Jews lost in the war. The Crypt, a huge Star of David carved out of black marble, is a symbolic tomb for the millions of unburied Jews, containing ashes recovered from the concentration camps, and the heartrending Children’s Memorial showcases eerily lit photographs of some of the 11,000 children murdered.

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Sights & Landmarks

La Cambe German War Cemetery

As the largest German WWII cemetery in France, the La Cambe German War Cemetery serves as a poignant reminder of the lives lost on both sides of the war. It’s a moving site, with its grey schist crosses and dark, flat headstones offering a more somber atmosphere than that of the American and Commonwealth cemeteries nearby.Although initially serving as a temporary American cemetery, today 21,222 soldiers from the German Armed Forces are buried at La Cambe. At the center of the cemetery, a 6-meter-high grassy hillock is capped with a single cross and serves as a mass grave for 296 soldiers, many of which are unknown. Just outside of the cemetery, the La Cambe Peace Garden opened in 1996, and is home to 1,200 maple trees, each planted by an individual or organization to symbolize reconciliation and lasting peace. A visitor center is also located at the entrance to the cemetery and offers further insight into the soldiers buried on-site.

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Buildings & Structure

Fontaine Saint-Michel

Fontaine Saint-Michel was sculpted by Gabriel Davioud in 1860 and gives its name to the square where it’s located, Place Saint-Michel. The monumental fountain, located between boulevard Saint-Michel and Place Saint-Andres-des-Arts was commissioned by Baron Georges-Eugene Haussmann as part of Napoleon III’s plans to bring more light and air to the city of Paris.The fountain depicts the archangel Michael vanquishing Satan, a controversial political symbol at the time hinting at Napoleon vanquishing the revolutionary fervor of the neighborhood. Unlike many of Paris’s fountains, Fontaine Saint-Michel was made from various colors of materials, including red and green marble, blue and yellow stone, and bronze. Place Saint-Michel is a popular meeting spot among both the city’s youth and foreign visitors.

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Gardens & Parks

Villa Ephrussi de Rothschild

Set on the serene Cap Ferrat cape jutting out over the Mediterranean, the picturesque Villa Ephrussi de Rothschild holds one of the most sought after settings on the French Riviera. The pink-painted villa, once belonging to wealthy Frenchwoman Béatrice Ephrussi de Rothschild, was designed by Belgian architect Aaron Messiah and built in the early 20th century. Today, the striking seafront palazzo is maintained by the Institut de France and is open to the public, and also hosts the annual summer opera festival: Opera Azuriales.The villa’s grounds are the real attraction with a collection of nine exquisitely landscaped gardens. These gardens, listed by the Ministry of Culture as some of the ‘notable gardens of France,’ feature Spanish and Japanese themed gardens, a colorful rose garden, and a ‘stone garden’ decorated with ornate ‘musical fountains,’ with water features synchronized to music.

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Sights & Landmarks

Saint-Emilion

Saint-Émilion is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, famous for the catacombs under the town, built on a beautiful spot overlooking the Dordogne valley. The steep cobblestone streets are lined with charming houses, fascinating Romanqesue ruins, and underground Monolithic church carved into the limestone.One of the principal red wine regions, located 35km northeast of Bordeaux, the town is named after a traveling monk, Émilion whose followers began producing commercial wine here in the 8th Century. The Romans planted vineyards here in the 2nd Century, and the main grape varieties now are Merlot and Cabernet Franc, with a sprinkling of Cabernet Sauvignon. The region's fine wines are made with time honored traditions at the Chateau Haut-Sarpe (Grand Cru Classe), Chateau Figeac and Chateau Beau Séjour Becot, just to name a few.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Pic St-Loup

At just 658 meters high, it might be surprising to learn that Pic St-Loup is one of the most beloved emblems of the city of Montpellier. After all, the Alps are not that far away. But thanks to low vegetation, impressive 300-meter-high cliffs, and a surrounding relief of just 150 meters, Pic St-Loup is very prominent and can be seen from just about everywhere in the Hérault department. It is, by definition, part of the lower end of Massif Central.Because of its micro-climate and unique flora, the mountain is a protected site and houses a thriving population of prey birds. The mountain is a very popular day trip from Montpellier for both curious tourists and serious hikers; there is an old chapel, castle ruins, a hermitage, and a symbolic cross atop the mountain. Not to mention the unobstructed panoramas, which stretch all the way from the Mediterranean Sea to the south to the Cevennes Mountains to the north.

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Sights & Landmarks

Pont de l'Alma (Alma Bridge)

Pont de l’Alma is a Parisian bridge built in 1854 in commemoration of the Franco-British alliance’s victory over the Russian army during the Crimean War. The bridge underwent complete rebuilding in the 1970s in order to accommodate the rapidly increasing road and river traffic – only the statues were retained from the original structure. The arch bridge is now 42 meters large and 153 meters long, and links the right and left banks of the Seine River.Pont de l’Alma offers splendid views of the Eiffel Tower and is often the go-to location for photographers wanting to capture Paris. What made the bridge a household name worldwide, however, is the role it played in Lady Diana’s death; indeed, she perished in a car crash at the entrance of the bridge’s tunnel in 1997. The Flame of Liberty at the bridge's north end has become an unofficial memorial to her memory.

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