Explore England

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

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Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

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Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

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Audio Guides

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Cultural/Heritage Places

North Yorkshire Moors Railway

Welcome aboard the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, a historic rail line in North England. When it first opened in 1835 trains were originally horse drawn, except at a steep incline where they were hauled by rope. It wasn’t until 1845 that steam engines came into the picture.When first created it served as a trade link, today it’s Britain’s most popular heritage steam railway carrying more than 300-thousand annual visitors along 18 miles of railway. In addition to rolling through impressive scenery in the heart of the North York Moors National Park, each station along the line takes passengers on a trip back in time depicting a year from 1912 to 1952. But the “celebrity station’ is Goathland, maybe better known as Hogsmeade. The station was transformed into Hogsmeade station for the first Harry Potter film.

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See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

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Bus Tours

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Places of Natural Beauty

Rydal Water

Despite its diminutive size at just over 1 km long, Rydal Water’s strong literary connections have cemented its status as one of the Lake District’s most visited spots. Wordsworth’s Seat, overlooking the western bank, was renowned as the poet’s favorite viewpoint, while nearby points of interest include Nab Cottage, once home to Thomas Quincey and three of Wordworth’s former homes – White Moss House, Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage.One of the few boat-free lakes, Rydal Water makes a perfect spot for open-air swimming during the warmer months, while the lakeside hills are at their most beautiful in spring and autumn, when fields of wildflowers and colorful foliage add a rich range of hues.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Aysgarth Falls

Immortalized on-screen in Kevin Costner’s Robin Hood Prince of Thieves and famously inspiring artists and poets like Ruskin, Turner and Wordsworth, the Aysgarth Falls have long been renowned as a local beauty spot. The three-tiered falls are undeniably photogenic, with thousands of gallons of water cascading down a series of natural limestone steps and framed by a canopy of trees.The scenic falls lie on the River Ure at the heart of the Yorkshire Dales National Park and make a popular destination for hikers, with a number of trails running through the surrounding woodlands and a walking route following the length of the falls. The falls are most impressive during the wetter months, when the water levels are highest, and strategically placed viewing decks offer expansive views over the landscape.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Crummock Water

Despite being the largest and central lake of the Buttermere Valley, Crummock Water is often overlooked in favor of neighboring Buttermere Lake, but there are plenty of good reasons to visit both. Measuring around 4 km in length, hiking around the lake from Buttermere takes around 3 hours and takes in highlights like Scale Force, England’s highest waterfall, which feeds into the lake, and the view from the lakeside Rannerdale Knotts.Rowing, kayaking and canoeing are all popular pastimes on Crummock Water, but the clear waters are also ideal for swimming during the summer months and the abundance of brown trout and salmon make it a popular choice for fishing.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Coniston Water

The third-largest lake in the English Lake District doesn’t fail to impress; at 5 miles (8 km) long, 184 feet (56 m) deep and half a mile (0.8 km) wide, it has been a favorite of kayak and canoe aficionados for several decades now and continues to entice visitors seeking stunning scenery and a feel for the much-hyped Lake District. Once the main fish source for the monks of Furness Abbey in the 13th century, it is now the home of the elegant, Victorian-era steam yacht Gondola, which sails from one end of the lake to the other between March and November.Around the lake, there are three main villages, Coniston, Brantwood and Hawkshead, where visitors can sleep, eat, drink and shop as they please. Hawkshead is particularly lovely and easy to explore on foot, featuring charming cobble lanes and the fan-favorite Beatrix Potter Gallery.

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Water Activities & Tours

Mersey Ferries

Taking a ferry across the Mersey has been a Liverpool tradition since Gerry and the Pacemakers sang the smash hit ‘Ferry Cross the Mersey’ in 1964. In fact, boats have been crossing the river at this point for more than 800 years.Departing from the Pier Head, next to the famous Liver Building on the riverfront, the company’s ferries sail across the water to Birkenhead and Seacombe on the Wirral Peninsula. The fleet’s three boats are called Snowdrop, Royal Daffodil and Royal Iris of the Mersey. Mersey Ferry services include cross-river commuter transport, 50-minute river explorer cruises, and trips along the Manchester Ship Canal to Salford Quays in Manchester. There are also special cruises throughout the year, including bird-watching sailings. Along with Gerry and the Pacemakers, many other artists have recorded ‘Ferry Cross the Mersey’, one of Liverpool’s most popular anthems, including Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Burton Cummings, Pat Metheny and Sir Paul McCartney.

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Sights & Landmarks

London Eye

Since it was officially opened on New Year's Eve 1999 (as part of the millennial celebrations), the London Eye has become one of London's most popular attractions. It has 32 sealed 'pod' capsules, fitting a total of 800 people, revolving on a huge Ferris wheel. One go-around takes half an hour with the wheel rotating at only twice the speed of a tortoise sprinting, so you can step on and off without the wheel needing to stop!The London Eye is the fourth-tallest structure in London, so the far-reaching views over London are spectacular. On a clear day you can see as far as Windsor Castle. And the slow speed of the rotation means there's plenty of time to see everything and take lots of photos.

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Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

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Classes & Workshops

Tickets & Passes

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Museums & Exhibitions

Sir John Soane's Museum

One of London’s most fascinating yet often-overlooked museums, Sir John Soane’s Museum is dedicated to its namesake, the much-celebrated neo-classical architect who designed a number of acclaimed Regency-era buildings including, most famously, the Bank of England. The museum, housed across three purpose-built houses in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, Central London, was the personal project and one-time home of Soane, designed to inspire and showcase his works to budding architects and students. Opening to the public after his death in 1837, the museum, although recently restored, remains true to Soane’s original design and displays over 20,000 architectural drawings and models.The building itself is also part of Soane’s work, with highlights including a unique geometric staircase and an exquisite mirrored dome ceiling in the Breakfast Room.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian’s Wall was built in the 2nd century AD during the reign of the emperor for whom it was named. At the time it marked the northernmost limit of the Roman Empire.The stone fortifications, stretching between present-day Newcastle and Carlisle, represent the greatest monument of Roman Britain and are protected as a UNESCO World Heritage site.The longest preserved stretches of wall are between the towns of Chollerford and Walton, while along its route you will find the remains of numerous forts as well as a temple dedicated to the goddess Mithras at Carrawburgh.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Captain Cook Memorial Museum

Chronicling the life and times of the iconic explorer, the Captain Cook Memorial Museum offers fascinating insight into Whitby's most famous former resident. Housed in the 17th-century home where a young James Cook took on his apprenticeship as a seaman, the museum’s star attraction is Cook’s attic room, decked out in period furnishings. At the museum, visitors can learn about Cook's now-legendary voyages through a fascinating collection of artifacts, letters, ship models and maps. Pore over original letters written by Cook and his crew; follow his travels through maps and charts; see items brought back from Cook's long journeys to New Zealand and the Pacific Islands; and admire paintings of the voyages by Parkinson, Hodges and Webber.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

For over a hundred years, characters like Jemima Puddle-Duck, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle and Peter Rabbit have made an indelible impression on children in Britain and beyond. Their creator, author Beatrix Potter, is intimately connected with the Lake District and this charming, compact gallery celebrates that bond with a display of original drawings showing the genesis of her books, which she wrote and illustrated herself.The Beatrix Potter Gallery is housed in a 17th century building which was once the office of Potter’s solicitor husband, William Heelis, and is situated in the town of Hawkshead. Exhibits also tell the life story of Potter herself and her commitment to conserving the natural beauty of the Lake District.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Beatles Story

Beatles fans come from across the universe to pay tribute to the Fab Four at Liverpool’s Beatles Story.From the Cavern Club to Abbey Road, this incredibly popular museum tells the story of Liverpool’s four most famous sons, their music, achievements, and massive impact on popular culture since the 1960s.Taking you on an atmospheric, multimedia journey, the Beatles Story features exhibitions of memorabilia, audio rooms, a replica of the Cavern, the interactive Discovery Zone, solo exhibits, Fab4 store and coffee shop.While you’re visiting, listen to the free living history audio guide for a self-guided tour of the exhibits. Highlights include John Lennon’s iconic round spectacles and George Harrison’s much-loved first guitar.Your ticket also gives you entry to the multimedia Fab4D theater experience at the branch of the museum at the Pier Head Mersey Ferry Terminal.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Jorvik Viking Centre

Go back in time and learn about the Viking history of York at the Jorvik Viking Centre. The museum is actually built on the site of a famous archeological dig uncovered more than three decades ago. Buried under eight tons of dirt, archaeologists found the remarkably preserved Viking city of Jorvik as it was 1,000 years ago. Along with houses, and workshops they uncovered more than 40-thousand artifacts. Rare objects made of wood and leather; objects that normally do not survive over time, were un-earthed in great condition. The moist-oxygen free soil is credited with helping to preserve the artifacts.Visitors can explore the reconstruction of the Viking streets, seeing how they would have looked so long ago. Built by the York Archaeological Trust, the goal was to recreate the Viking city keeping it as authentic as possible, from the layout of houses to the distinct smells of the neighborhood.

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Buildings & Structure

Radcliffe Camera

With its striking neoclassical dome looming over the neighboring Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Camera (or Radcliffe Room in Latin) is one of Oxford’s most iconic sights and one of the most photographed of all the university buildings. Funded by Royal physician John Radcliffe and designed by architect James Gibbs, the "Rad Cam" was completed in 1749 and was originally used as the university’s principal science library.Today the Radcliffe Camera is part of the Bodleian Library complex and houses two reading rooms and an underground library, where about 600,000 English and history books are available for browsing. The interior of building is closed to the public except with guided tours, but the dramatic circular façade still draws crowds of daily visitors with its three tiers of Headington and Burford stone elaborately decorated and encircled with Corinthian columns.

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Buildings & Structure

Mansion House

A striking example of Palladian architecture with its imposing Corinthian columns and regal façade, the Mansion House makes a fitting residence for the Lord Mayor of London. The official residence and head office of the Lord Mayor since 1752, the house remains an important political center, hosting numerous civic meetings, fundraising events, receptions and dinners throughout the year.The Mansion House is open to the public for guided tours (weekly or by appointment), allowing visitors to admire the opulent drawing rooms, peek into the Old Ballroom and marvel over the Egyptian Hall, actually designed in a classical Roman style. Highlights of a visit include the 18th-century Hallkeeper's Chair; the glittering crystal chandeliers in the Salon; and the Harold Samuel art collection, which features notable paintings and sculptures by 17th-century Dutch and Flemish artists.

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Casinos

York Dungeon

Whisking visitors on a hair-raising journey through York’s grim and gruesome past, the York Dungeon is one of the city’s most entertaining attractions, located close to the landmark Clifford’s Tower. Spanning over 2,000 years of York’s history, the city’s most notorious ghosts and villains are brought to life in the dungeons, with 11 shows employing a wacky cast of actors, authentic sets and costumes, and special effects to shock and scare even the bravest of participants.Get lost in the murky world of 18th century York, as you watch the infamous outlaw Dick Turpin meet his fated end in the gallows; follow notorious traitor Guy Fawkes as his plot to blow up Parliament is foiled; see how the Great Plague raged through the city in 1349; or test your nerves as you hunt down the eerie Ghosts of York. That’s not all – there’s also a terrifying invasion by bloodthirsty Vikings, medieval torture chambers and the treacherous Labyrinth of the Last Roman Legion.

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Buildings & Structure

Albert Memorial

With its ornate spires, elaborate friezes and 53-meter-high central cross, the Albert Memorial surely ranks among London’s most impressive monuments, and it’s impossible to miss, standing proud over the south entrance to Kensington Gardens, opposite the equally grand Royal Albert Hall.Inaugurated by Queen Victoria in 1872, the striking memorial is dedicated to her beloved husband, Prince Albert, whose untimely death of typhoid fever in 1861, at just 42 years old, had left her grief-stricken. Devoted not only to Prince Albert, but to all his passions and achievements, the masterful Gothic design is the work of Sir George Gilbert Scott and features a central gilded statue of Albert, holding the catalogue of the 1851 Great Exhibition. Surrounding statues represent the Prince’s main areas of interest - engineering, agriculture, commerce and art, while the intricate frieze at the base of the monument features images of 178 artists, poets and musicians.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Castlerigg Stone Circle

There are numerous neolithic stone circles in the Lake District and nearby areas, the most popular being at Castlerigg. This more-or-less round grouping of 38 boulders, with a rectangle of 10 more joining the inner edge of the circle, dates back some 5000 years, making it even older than Stonehenge. And like Stonehenge, the arrangement of Castlerigg Stone Circle is clearly linked to movements of the sun and moon, although the original ceremonial purpose of the stones is lost in time. The stones themselves are impressive; add the majestic backdrop of Skiddaw, Blencathra and other mountains and you can see why this site has drawn admirers for millennia. An ideal spot to contemplate the mysteries of the past amidst the serenity of nature.

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Religious Architecture

Holy Trinity Church

With a history dating back more than 1,000 years and a serene setting on the banks of the River Avon, the Holy Trinity Church has long been renowned as one of England’s most beautiful and most visited parish churches. An architectural highlight of Stratford-upon-Avon, the Grade I listed church dates in part from the 13th century and is celebrated for its fine Clopton Chapel, Victorian stained glass windows and series of 26 ornately decorated misericords, as well as a first edition 1611 King James Bible on display.The lavish interiors are impressive enough, but for most visitors the main draw to the Holy Trinity is its connection with William Shakespeare. The iconic playwright was famously born in Stratford-upon-Avon and was both christened and buried at the church. Visitors can view Shakespeare’s Grave for a small fee, as well as the graves of Anne Hathaway, Dr John Hall and his wife Susanna, and Thomas Nash.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Merchant Adventurers' Hall

As the name implies, York’s Merchant Adventurers were merchants. They traded along the English coast, northern Europe and sometimes as far as the Baltic and Iceland, bringing back an assortment of desired goods to York. The city was an important river port and the wealthiest city in Northern England, second only to London for most of the Middle Ages, allowing the merchants to make enough money to build the Hall between 1357 and 1361.It was ahead of the time, built before craft or trade guild halls were common in Britain. There are three rooms in the Hall, and each served a specific purpose. Business and social gatherings took place in the Great Hall, the Undercroft served as an almshouse caring for the sick and poor, and religious events were conducted in the Chapel. The Hall has a number of collections; everything from paintings, to furniture and silver. The Company of Merchant Adventurers still use the Hall for meetings and events and hold services in the Chapel.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Somerset House

Overlooking the Thames in central London, Somerset House was originally built at the behest of Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset and lord protector of England. In its original incarnation it was a grand Tudor palace, and one of the first examples of Renaissance architecture in England. Over the years Somerset house served as residence to Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Anne of Denmark, and General Fairfax. It was even used to display Oliver Cromwell’s body after his death in 1658.Over time the original Tudor Palace fell into disrepair, and by the mid-19th-century Somerset house had been demolished and rebuilt as a grand and imposing neo-classical “national building,” housing various public offices. Today Somerset House functions primarily as a public space and cultural hub. Inside you can find the acclaimed collection of the Courtauld Gallery, cafes and restaurants, and visitors can enjoy free historical guided tours.

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Sights & Landmarks

Blackfriars Bridge

Blackfriars Bridge is the busiest of the four bridges located in central London. It crosses the River Thames bringing both road and foot traffic from one side to the other. The bridge has been updated several times, but the current bridge is 923 feet long, 105 feet wide, and has five wrought iron arches. Stone carvings decorate the piers of the bridge. On the east side the carvings show marine life and seabirds, and on the west side the carvings depict freshwater birds. This reflects the tidal turning point in the river. Most river boat tours along the River Thames will sail underneath the Blackfriars Bridge along with Millennium Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and London Bridge.In 1982 the bridge gained international notoriety when the body of Roberto Calvi, a former chairman of Italy's largest private bank, was found hanging from one of the arches of the bridge. Five bricks were attached to his body, and around $14,000 in three different currencies was found in his pockets.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Avebury

Some places just have a special feeling and Avebury is one of them. A Neolithic site of three stone circles dating from 2600 BC, Avebury has the largest stone circle in Europe. Avebury is a henge, which means a bank or ditch with stone circles within this ring. No-one knows exactly who built it or why but it was most likely used for some kind of worship. Today it is still important to contemporary pagans especially during the solstices. The village of Avebury is partially within the circle, and in the 1930s archaeologist Alexander Keiller became interested in the stones and began excavating. He opened a small museum in the stables of his home, Avebury Manor. Today the museum fills the stables and a 17th-century barn with interactive displays which bring the site to life for adults and kids alike. Avebury Manor has also just reopened to the public.

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Sights & Landmarks

Millennium Bridge

The 330-meter-long steel Millennium Bridge stands over the River Thames, connecting the St. Paul’s Cathedral to the north with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the Tate Modern at the southern end of the structure.Due to a noticeable swaying motion, which had some people clinging to the rails feeling seasick and others enjoying the exhilarating ride, the structure had to be closed down only two days after opening in June, 2000. Although it took almost another two years to complete the necessary repairs, install dampeners and make the bridge more stable, it had already become widely famous in the two days it was accessible and earned itself the nickname “Wobbly Bridge.” The suspension bridge is no longer wobbly, but it is still an interesting way to cross the Thames. And due to its low-hanging support beams and rods, the bridge offers nice views of both the City of London and the South Bank.

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Religious Architecture

St. Stephen Walbrook

This London church, with its massive decorated dome, is considered a precursor to the city’s famous St. Paul’s Cathedral. It is one of the finest of architect Christopher Wren’s churches with its Corinthian columns and modern white marble altar designed by sculptor Henry Moore. The altar’s design and placement in the middle of the church was at the time controversial.It was constructed from 1672-1679, after the medieval church on which it stands was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is an Anglican Parish church steeped in history and tradition and is often named as a jewel of English architecture. The 65 foot dome masterfully supported by columns and arches is celebrated, as is its illumination and use of natural light through strategically placed windows. Many consider it to be one of the most important buildings in England.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top House

Beatrix Potter’s love affair with the English Lake District is practically as famous as her children’s tales. Her numerous and extensive holidays in the bucolic North West England region included stays at the Hill Top Farm, which she bought in 1905. The celebrated author spent as much time as she could in her beloved house, where she found inspiration in the farm and neighboring villages. She even used the exterior of Hill Top Farm as the setting of some of her original tales such as The Tale of Samuel Whiskers.As a major and longtime supporter of the National Trust, it was natural for Potter to bequest the six-room farmhouse and its flourishing grounds to the organization upon her death, with the condition that it be kept exactly as she left it, including china, furniture and decorative items. It has since been open to the public, with over 1.5 million visitors hailing from around the world since 1946.

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Buildings & Structure

Bodleian Library

The main research library of the University of Oxford and one of the oldest of its kind in Europe, the Bodleian Library is also one of the UK’s five "copyright libraries," famously housing a copy of every book printed in Great Britain—a collection that spans more than 11 million works. Founded by Sir Thomas Bodley in 1602, the Bodleian Library, or "the Bod" as it’s known to students, is actually a complex of libraries and reading rooms located in the heart of Oxford, including the domed Radcliffe Camera, the vaulted Divinity Room, the Duke Humphrey's Library and the Old and New Bodleian Libraries.With its towering shelves of prized books and manuscripts, exploring the Bodleian libraries is a rare treat for book lovers, with everything from early manuscripts, biblical texts and ancient maps to rare literary editions, Oriental manuscripts and a large collection of original J.R.R Tolkien works.

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Buildings & Structure

Royal Crescent

A dramatic reminder of Bath’s Georgian heritage and one of the city’s most photographed historic landmarks, the Royal Crescent is aptly named, with its crescent-shaped row of terraced townhouses and regal architecture. Built between 1767 and 1775 by architect John Wood the Younger, the Royal Crescent features a row of magnificent terraced townhouses, looking out over a vast expanse of manicured lawns.There are 30 houses along the crescent, each looming 47-foot (14-meters) high, fronted by gigantic Ionic columns and renowned for their beautifully preserved Georgian facades. Many of the houses are still private homes, but No. 1 Royal Crescent is now a museum, offering visitors a glimpse into life in Georgian-era Bath, while No. 16 is home to the luxurious Royal Crescent Hotel.

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Sights & Landmarks

All Souls College

One of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford is All Souls College, though the official name is the Warden and the College of the Souls of All Faithful People Deceased in the University of Oxford. It is primarily a graduate research institution with no undergraduate students. The college's library collection is housed in the Codrington Library building, an impressive building that was completed in 1751 and has been in used ever since. Today the library contains about 185,000 items, of which about one third were published before 1800. A four story gate tower and two story ranges on either side of the entrance on High Street are mostly the same as they were originally built in the 1440s. Battlements were added in the 16th century, and the windows are from the Victorian period. Once you pass through the gate house, you will see a medieval building where the Warden once lived and now provides individual rooms for Fellows.

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Museums & Exhibitions

London Film Museum

The London Film Museum, tucked away in a quiet part of Covent Garden, was founded and created by Jonathan Sands in 2008 following the success of Star Wars, the Exhibition. It is entirely dedicated to the British film industry and hosts regular, big-ticket film-themed exhibitions featuring original props, costumes and sets of all kinds. Past exhibitions include Bond in Motion, Charlie Chaplin - The Great Londoner and Ray Harryhausen, Myths & Legends.The museum was once voted the best family attraction in Britain by the Telegraph. It also features a permanent exhibition (50 percent of which is from Sands’ personal collection) which contains cinema artefacts, photography, films and multimedia tools, taking visitors on a journey through the history of the seventh art, the democratization of its techniques and the story behind today’s blockbusters.

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Sights & Landmarks

Bridge of Sighs

Hertford Bridge, more commonly known as the Bridge of Sighs, is a skyway bridge linking two parts of Hertford College over New College Land in Oxford, England. The Old Quadrangle, which houses the college's administrative offices, is to the south, and the New Quadrangle, which is mostly student accommodation, is to the north. It was completed in 1914 and is often referred to as the Bridge of Sighs because it supposedly looks like the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, Italy. However, many say it more closely resembles Venice's Rialto Bridge. It is one of the area's top tourist sights due to its unique look and design.There was a famous legend about the bridge from decades ago that said a survey was taken of the health of the students of the University of Oxford. The results of the survey indicated that Hertford College students were the heaviest, resulting in the college closing the bridge in order to force the students to take the stairs and get more exercise.

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Sights & Landmarks

Christ Church College

The largest and arguably most renowned of Oxford’s many colleges, the hallowed halls and exquisite cathedral of Christ Church College have a long and illustrious history. Founded by Cardinal Thomas Woolsey in 1524, the grandiose complex includes architectural highlights like Sir Christopher Wren’s Great Tom bell tower and the Great Hall, where King Charles I held court during the English Civil War. Despite being just one of 38 colleges, for many visitors to Oxford, Christ Church is synonymous with Oxford University. Today, the legendary buildings see almost as many tourists as they do students. Christ Church’s esteemed alumni include philosopher John Locke, Albert Einstein, architects John Ruskin and Sir Christopher Wren and former Prime Minister William Gladstone. But its academic resume isn’t the only string to its bow. The prestigious college has also made its mark in popular culture, starring as the now-iconic Great Hall of Hogwarts in the Harry Potter movies.

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Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

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Tickets & Passes

Top Attractions

Sights & Landmarks

Platform 9 3/4

Fans of Harry Potter will be familiar with the importance of Platform 9 ¾. The fictional platform is located at the very real King's Cross train station in London between platforms 9 and 10. In the Harry Potter books and films, Platform 9 ¾ is where the Hogwarts Express can be boarded on September 1 at 11am. There is a wrought iron archway in between platforms 9 and 10, and the students must walk or run directly at what appears to be a solid wall barrier.Due to the logistics of platforms 9 and 10, filming of Platform 9 ¾ actually took place between platforms 4 and 5. But so many people came to see Platform 9 ¾ that eventually half of a luggage cart was permanently installed to look like it is going through the archway. Harry Potter fans from around the world come here to have their picture taken with the luggage cart. There is also a Harry Potter themed shop located nearby where you can purchase a wide variety of souvenirs and prop replicas.

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Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

Top Attractions

Sights & Landmarks

Up at The O2

Stretching 190 meters across the famous dome of London’s O2 Arena in Greenwich, the O2 Skywalk, or ‘Up at The O2’ as it was more recently renamed, offers visitors a way to get their kicks without even setting foot inside. The landmark stadium has transformed its yellow-flagged rooftop with a vertigo-inducing fabric walkway suspended some 53-meters off the ground and offering an incredible panoramic view from its central observation platform. This is no mere rooftop stroll though – participants are decked out with climbing suits, special shoes and safety harnesses as they make the ascent in groups of 15 attached to a central safety wire, and with the climb being compared to a scaling a long open-air trampoline, it won’t just be the vistas that get your adrenaline flowing.

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Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

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Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Top Attractions

Theatres & Cinemas

Her Majesty's Theatre

There has been a theater on the site of Her Majesty's since 1705, but this incarnation opened in 1897 as a fine example of Victorian civic architecture. Today, the theater is part of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Group of entertainment venues, including six theaters throughout London's razzle-dazzle West End.With a capacity of 1,100 in the main auditorium, Her Majesty's Theatre has been showing the fabulous Phantom of the Opera musical—known for its spectacular stage sets and Lloyd Webber's opera-lite score—since its world premiere in 1986, notching up a record-breaking run of more than 12,000 performances. The show plays to packed audiences nightly.The theater was given a thorough overhaul in 2014, with many of its paintings cleaned and the stalls re-gilded. The 2.5-hour Phantom of the Opera performance runs Monday through Saturday at 7:30pm, with matinees on Thursday and Saturday at 2:30pm. A variety of afternoon tea and dinner packages are available.

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Buildings & Structure

Highclere Castle

Highclere Castle is best known as the filming location of the popular British TV drama Downton Abbey and home to the fictional Crawley family. In reality, the estate is owned by George Herbert, the eighth Earl of Carnarvon, and his wife Lady Carnarvon. The castle has been in the Carnarvon family for centuries, but it was remodeled from a simple mansion to its current grandeur between 1839 and 1842 by Sir Charles Barry, an architect known for his contributions to a Renaissance-revival movement.Located in the rolling green hills of Hampshire, the estate covers over 5,000 acres of mostly parkland. It includes forests, lakes and decorative gardens planted with a wide array of plants ranging from climbing roses, lavender and geraniums to fruit trees and meticulously sculpted hedges. In the center of it all sits the great Victorian castle with its pinnacles and towers jutting into the air.

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Buildings & Structure

Lambeth Palace

As the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for almost 800 years, Lambeth Palace has a long and significant history, but for most visitors, it’s the building itself that garners the most attention. The palace’s 15th-century monumental gateway, known as Morton's Tower, is an imposing sight, but the oldest parts of the building, including Langton's Chapel and the Crypt date back to the early 13th-century.Today, Lambeth Palace is open to the public by guided tour only, which grant visitors’ access to the Archbishop of Canterbury's lavishly decorated State Rooms, the Chapel, Atrium and Crypt, the 10-acre gardens and the magnificent, recently renovated Great Hall.

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Buildings & Structure

Sheldonian Theatre

Built by master architect Sir Christopher Wren, whose later works included the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral in London, the Sheldonian Theatre stands out among Oxford’s many landmarks with its grand semi-circular design reminiscent of a classical Roman theater. The Grade I-listed building has been one of Oxford’s principal venues since it opened its doors in 1668, and it even hosted the first performance of Handel’s third oratorio Athalia. Today, the theater is primarily used as the ceremonial hall of the University of Oxford.If you’re not lucky enough to attend a lecture, concert or graduation ceremony in the Sheldonian’s 950-seat auditorium, you can still admire the opulent interiors and magnificent hand-painted ceiling when the theater is not in use. Also open to visitors is the rooftop cupola, renowned for its impressive panoramic views of the city.

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Buildings & Structure

Bamburgh Castle

Sitting on a 150-ft (46-m) volcanic outcrop overlooking the North Sea on one side and a cute little town of the same name on the other, Bamburgh Castle began life in Anglo-Saxon times as the fortified home of the kings of Northumberland. By the 12th century the massive stone keep was in place; this is the oldest part of the castle as most of what stands today is a Victorian folly. It is the result of rebuilding in the 19th century by the wealthy industrialist Lord Armstrong, who was also responsible for creating Cragside House nearby, where hydroelectricity was first used in 1863. Today Bamburgh is still the private home of the Armstrong family, and a tour of its interior winds through impressive staterooms laden with decorative arts from Sèvres porcelain to medieval weaponry.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Blenheim Palace

Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, is one of the largest country houses in England and known as the birthplace of Winston Churchill. The Palace has been in the Churchill family since it was constructed as a gift from the English nation to John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough, in 1704 for a significant military triumph against the French at the Battle of Blenheim.The house was completed in the short-lived English-Baroque style, and its reception rooms, devoid of any unnecessary comfort, reflect the palace’s present role as a national monument rather than a family home. The imposing main hall leads to a frescoed saloon, which looks out over the Column of Victory in the adjacent castle park, with the surrounding trees symbolizing Marlborough’s soldiers. The saloon is highly decorated, complete with a bust of the vanquished Louis XIV at its back.

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Theatres & Cinemas

London National Theatre

Both an iconic landmark and a prestigious performance venue, the National Theatre is one of England’s most renowned performing arts centers and a mainstay of London’s theater scene since it opened back in 1963. Even from the outside, it’s an imposing sight, looming over the waterfront of London’s Southbank, and its unmistakable yet rather unattractive concrete façade has long divided public opinion. The National Theatre boasts four purpose-built auditoriums (the Olivier, Lyttelton, Dorfman and Temporary theatres), as well as an open-air performance space in the forecourt, a bookshop and a collection of bars, restaurants and cafés open to the public. The theatre’s ever-changing roster of shows includes over 20 new productions each year, with past hits including West End favorites like 'War Horse' and 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time'; classic plays like Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and The Tempest; and contemporary musicals like Wonder.land.

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Theatres & Cinemas

St. Martin's Theatre

The treasure of the London West End! St Martin's Theatre is one of the few remaining privately-owned theatres in London thanks to the Willoughby de Broke family and has staged many famous plays since its opening. It opened its doors in 1916 with the spectacular Edwardian musical comedy Houp La!, starring the now-iconic actress Gertie Millar. The St Martin's has also hosted plays penned by the likes of John Galsworthy, Frederick Lonsdale and Noel Coward, including the chilling thriller Sleuth, The Grass is Greener and The Wrong Side of the Park.But what makes the St Martin’s so famous isn’t so much its humble yet successful beginnings; the theatre holds the record for the longest continuously running show in the world with Agatha Christies’ The Mousetrap, having exceeded 25,000 performances since opening night in 1952 - as long as HRH Queen Elizabeth II has been on the throne.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Royal Festival Hall

It might be the grand centerpiece of the Southbank Centre, Central London’s renowned cultural hub, and among the capital’s most famous classical music venues, but the Royal Festival Hall is also an impressive landmark in its own right. Located in a Grade-I listing building on the banks of the River Thames, the concert hall first opened its doors in 1951 during the Festival of Britain and now boasts a newly restored 2,500-seat auditorium and the lavish Clore Ballroom.The Royal Festival Hall is best known as the home of the prestigious London Philharmonic orchestra, and the venue is used throughout the year for a host of classical music recitals, pop concerts, operas and ballets, including a number of annual music and cultural festivals.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall in London was opened in March 1871 by Queen Victoria and was named for Prince Albert. Its original purpose was to serve multiple functions as a central hall to promote the understanding and appreciation of the arts and sciences. The building hosts concerts, exhibitions, public meetings, scientific conversations, and award ceremonies. It is also registered as a charity held in trust for the nation, but it receives no funding from the government and is financially self-sufficient.More than 350 events are held in the Hall's main auditorium each year including classical music, jazz, folk and world music, rock and pop concerts, circus, opera, dance, comedy, tennis, awards ceremonies, and film premieres. Many of the world's greatest artists have performed here, from Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, and the Beatles, to more modern acts. The Hall also hosts events of national significance such as the Royal British Legion's annual Festival of Remembrance.

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Dance & Night Clubs

Cavern Club

The Beatles experienced their first taste of fame at Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where the Fab Four first performed on November 9, 1961.The underground cellar club started life in 1957 as a jazz and skiffle club. John Lennon first played here in the Quarrymen, an earlier incarnation of the Beatles, on August 7, 1957. Paul joined John on stage here with the Quarrymen in January 1958, and George first played here in February 1961.The club moved from jazz to beat music, and the Beatles played more than 290 gigs, steadily building up a loyal fan base and honing their musical skills. They played their last show at the Cavern on 3 August 1963.Other beat groups took over from the Beatles at the Cavern, including the Hollies, the Stones, the Kinks and the Yardbirds.Following the Cavern’s closure in 1973, the club was re-erected on part of the original bulldozed site in the 1980s. Today, the Cavern is a vibrant music venue once more.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Dover Castle

An imposing fortress looming above the famous White Cliffs of Dover, Dover Castle is not only one of England’s largest and oldest medieval castles, but one of its most strategically important, standing guard over the narrowest point of the English Channel and the first line of defense against mainland Europe.Although built by William the Conqueror in 1066, Dover Castle actually has a much longer legacy, preceded by an Anglo-Saxon fort and a Roman lighthouse, and seeing battle several times throughout its reign. Visitors can climb the 12th-century Great Tower, walk the battlements, view the ruins of the ancient Roman lighthouse, and even explore the warren of secret wartime tunnels that burrow beneath the castle. There’s also the Princess of Wales' Royal Regiment Museum and a series of exhibitions, where you’ll discover life in the royal court of King Henry II, learn about how the castle was used as a hospital during WWII and relive the horrors of the Siege of 1216.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Eltham Palace

Reopened in 2015 after a £1.7 million renovation project, Eltham Palace is looking the best it ever has and the grand Tudor residence makes a worthy detour from nearby Greenwich. As the childhood home of Henry VIII, the medieval palace boasts a fascinating royal history, but it’s best known for its elaborate art deco style interiors, transformed in the 1930s by wealthy businessman Stephen Courtauld. Visitors to Eltham Palace are whisked back to the 1930s as they explore the domed entrance hall, where the Courtaulds held their glamorous cocktail parties; peek into the opulent gold bathroom and stroll the exquisite orchid and rose gardens. Also open to guests are a series of new rooms, including a map room, a walk-in wardrobe filled with beautiful period clothing, a basement billiard room and a WWII bunker. Traces of the palace’s medieval roots can also be seen, most notably in the glorious wood-beamed Great Hall and the historic moat, crossed by London's oldest working bridge.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Shakespeare's Globe

Theatrically inclined visitors to London will delight in the relatively recently reconstructed replica of the Globe Theatre, with which the Bard was famously associated. Guided tours of the facility offer an unparalleled glimpse into the theatrical craft, culture and community that thrived during Shakespeare's day (and in response to the author's mighty quill).Originally constructed in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company (the so-called Lord Chamberlain's Men), the structure was decimated by a fire 14 years later. A second structure was promptly erected, only to be closed in 1642, a mere 26 years after its founder's death.A faithful replica of the structure (dubbed “Shakespeare's Globe”) was opened to the public in 1997, just 750 feet from the site of its predecessors. It offers the world's largest exhibition dedicated to the greatest scribbler in the English language, complete with actors, recordings and interactive displays.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Leeds Castle

Constantly undergoing alterations and upkeep in its 900 year history, its condition is amongst the best condition Europe’s medieval era landmarks. The castle is currently riddled with lovely accumulated décor such as tapestries, ceramics and paintings. Surrounded by Kent County's gorgeous landscape, the castle grounds contain an aviary, grotto, and golf course. Not to mention that it also makes its facilities open year-round for larger-scale events. And if that isn't enough, visit the castle's hedge maze, which uses over 2,400 yew trees. As a little incentive to complete the tricky maze, the only viable entrance to the grotto is located at its end.

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Well-known Landmarks

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain's sovereigns since 1837. Most impressive are the State Rooms, which form the heart of the working palace. They are lavishly furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection and adorned with paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer and Canaletto. Also see exquisite examples of S'vres porcelain and some of the finest English and French furniture in the world. Outside, marvel at the ceremonious Changing of the Guard.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Brighton Dome

Encompassing three different venues – the Concert Hall, Corn Exchange and Pavilion Theatre – under one roof, the Brighton Dome is Brighton’s number 1 destination for the arts. Housed in an elegant Grade I-listed building at the center of the Royal Pavilion Estate, the stylish venue is linked via underground tunnels to the Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum, and boasts a fascinating history, once serving as a Royal stables and WWI hospital.The award-winning venues host hundreds of shows, concerts and workshops each year, with events including music, theatre, dance, comedy, visual arts and film. The top ticket is the legendary Brighton Festival, renowned as one of England’s leading multi-arts festivals and held over three weeks each May. As well as the trio of venues, the Dome is also home to the Brighton Dome Café-bar and Studio Theatre Bar, both of which are open to the public.

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Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

Top Activities

Dinner Cruises

Top Attractions

Market

Borough Market

You think you know what food markets are all about? Borough Market will change your mind, as this is a place of food dreams. On Thursday, Friday and especially Saturday, you’ll find both the locals doing their weekly shopping and people who have caught the train in from all over London just to buy the specialties on offer here. Borough Market has things you won’t find anywhere else. Prepared food, meats, fish, chocolates, fruits, vegetables – all sold by people who love food and can tell you exactly what you’re buying, how it was grown or made. Foodie paradise. There has been a market in this London Bridge area since the 11th century; it’s been on this site since the 13th century and in St Mary’s Churchyard triangle since the 18th. In the last decade, Borough Market has really won its reputation as London’s best local produce market as some of England’s most innovative and quality growers and food-makers have set up stalls.

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Market

Camden Market

Camden Market is actually a group of markets including Camden Lock Market, Camden Stables Market, and Camden Canal Market. It's the largest street market in the UK and has been going since the 1970s. Here you can find everything and anything from books, to clothing, to designer jewellery, CDs, food, and alternate fashions. You might even see a few famous musicians, and you'll definitely see some unique fashion statements! Camden is a lively area full of cafes, pubs, and live music venues. Camden Market is a place to wander and follow your eyes, your ears, and your nose.

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Market

Portobello Road

Portobello market is world renowned for its antiques market with over 2,000 specialist dealers and vast crowds of bargain hunters, but the two-mile long sprawl includes a plethora of other goods. Vintage clothing, local designers and handcrafted accessories make up the fashion section of the market, with an array of unique and trend-setting pieces on offer, and plenty of incognito celebrities scouring the clothing racks. Hoards of eccentric retro memorabilia, one-of-a-kind furniture and second-hand household items, a wide range of bootlegged music and vinyl and a sprawling fruit and vegetable market, make up the rest of the stalls. The street market is open six days a week but the Saturday market (which includes the main antiques market) is the most popular and crammed with vendors. There’s plenty to keep you occupied when you’ve finished shopping too – a number of independent art galleries, vintage clothing boutiques, bars and chic cafés.

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Market

Leadenhall Market

One of London’s most atmospheric Victorian shopping arcades, Leadenhall Market has a history dating back to the 14th century, making it one of the capital’s oldest covered markets. Restored in the early 90s, the majority of Leadenhall’s current design dates back to 1881 and is the work of architect Sir Horace Hones - a striking mix of Portland stone pillars, gabled red brick entryways and exquisite paintwork, capped with dramatic glass and iron vaulted ceilings. Today, Leadenhall hosts a small meat and fresh produce market during the week, but is best known for the many shops, cafes and restaurants that line its cobbled lanes, as well as making a popular stop for fans of the Harry Potter films – the distinctive arcade was famously immortalized on screen as Diagon Alley in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

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Market

Covent Garden

Covent Garden is an area of London centered on a popular covered market in the heart of London. Once a monks' convent garden in the 13th century, it quickly developed into a fruit and vegetable market for the city, was redeveloped in 1630 by the Earl of Bedford to be ringed by fashionable residences modeled on Italian piazzas, then became a center for theater and opera. Today the covered market building is a home to shops selling gourmet and specialist foods and souvenirs. The Royal Opera House remains located in Covent Garden, and the piazza area is long famous for its street performers. Within the wider area known as Covent Garden are many more theaters and a wonderful tangle of narrow streets full of some of London's best shops. Floral Street, Long Acre, Shorts Gardens, Neal Street and Mercer Street have some of London's best and most diverse shopping, leading towards the area Seven Dials, where seven streets converge.

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England

25 Featured Attractions

Market

Borough Market

You think you know what food markets are all about? Borough Market will change your mind, as this is a place of food dreams. On Thursday, Friday and especially Saturday, you’ll find both the locals doing their weekly shopping and people who have caught the train in from all over London just to buy the specialties on offer here. Borough Market has things you won’t find anywhere else. Prepared food, meats, fish, chocolates, fruits, vegetables – all sold by people who love food and can tell you exactly what you’re buying, how it was grown or made. Foodie paradise. There has been a market in this London Bridge area since the 11th century; it’s been on this site since the 13th century and in St Mary’s Churchyard triangle since the 18th. In the last decade, Borough Market has really won its reputation as London’s best local produce market as some of England’s most innovative and quality growers and food-makers have set up stalls.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Her Majesty's Theatre

There has been a theater on the site of Her Majesty's since 1705, but this incarnation opened in 1897 as a fine example of Victorian civic architecture. Today, the theater is part of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Group of entertainment venues, including six theaters throughout London's razzle-dazzle West End.With a capacity of 1,100 in the main auditorium, Her Majesty's Theatre has been showing the fabulous Phantom of the Opera musical—known for its spectacular stage sets and Lloyd Webber's opera-lite score—since its world premiere in 1986, notching up a record-breaking run of more than 12,000 performances. The show plays to packed audiences nightly.The theater was given a thorough overhaul in 2014, with many of its paintings cleaned and the stalls re-gilded. The 2.5-hour Phantom of the Opera performance runs Monday through Saturday at 7:30pm, with matinees on Thursday and Saturday at 2:30pm. A variety of afternoon tea and dinner packages are available.

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Sights & Landmarks

Gabriel's Wharf

With its picturesque riverside promenade, colorful shopfronts and terrace cafés, Gabriel's Wharf is the ideal spot to soak up the atmosphere of the Thames riverside. Located on London’s lively Southbank, the redeveloped wharf lies just a short walk from the landmark OXO tower and the waterfront Bernie Spain Gardens, and is buzzing with life both day and night.As well as browsing the many independent designer boutiques, handicraft stores and art galleries, visitors to Gabriel's Wharf can choose from a diverse range of cafés, bars and restaurants. Be sure to snag a table with a waterfront view – the wharf looks out over St Paul’s Cathedral, Waterloo Bridge and Somerset House.

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Market

Camden Market

Camden Market is actually a group of markets including Camden Lock Market, Camden Stables Market, and Camden Canal Market. It's the largest street market in the UK and has been going since the 1970s. Here you can find everything and anything from books, to clothing, to designer jewellery, CDs, food, and alternate fashions. You might even see a few famous musicians, and you'll definitely see some unique fashion statements! Camden is a lively area full of cafes, pubs, and live music venues. Camden Market is a place to wander and follow your eyes, your ears, and your nose.

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Sights & Landmarks

East End

Renowned throughout Victorian times as the home of the working class, the birthplace of Cockney Rhyming Slang and the stomping ground of the notorious Jack the Ripper, London’s East End has long been associated with the grittier side of the capital. But despite its rough-around-the-edges image, the East End remains one of Londoners’ favorite haunts and its high population of young and immigrant residents has made it one of the city’s most cosmopolitan and ever-evolving districts, teeming with fashion-forward nightclubs, vintage emporiums and modern art galleries.Since the Olympic Games took over the city in 2012, East London has undergone a 21st-century makeover, with the vast Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park now sprawling over Stratford and a cluster of glitzy shopping malls and chic eateries springing up around it.

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Scenic Landmarks

Buttermere Valley

With its three lakes framed by a seemingly expanse of rolling hills and craggy peaks, Buttermere Valley is one of the Lake District’s most striking landscapes, and it’s been a popular spot for walkers and nature enthusiasts since the 18th century.The tranquil Buttermere village makes the obvious basecamp, but most visitors come to hike the scenic lakeside trails or scale the surrounding peaks, which include the 851-meter Grasmoor and 806-meter High Stile, as well as Scale Force, England’s highest waterfall. Honister Pass is the main road running through the valley and during the summer months, swimming and rowing are popular activities on the lakes.

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Market

Portobello Road

Portobello market is world renowned for its antiques market with over 2,000 specialist dealers and vast crowds of bargain hunters, but the two-mile long sprawl includes a plethora of other goods. Vintage clothing, local designers and handcrafted accessories make up the fashion section of the market, with an array of unique and trend-setting pieces on offer, and plenty of incognito celebrities scouring the clothing racks. Hoards of eccentric retro memorabilia, one-of-a-kind furniture and second-hand household items, a wide range of bootlegged music and vinyl and a sprawling fruit and vegetable market, make up the rest of the stalls. The street market is open six days a week but the Saturday market (which includes the main antiques market) is the most popular and crammed with vendors. There’s plenty to keep you occupied when you’ve finished shopping too – a number of independent art galleries, vintage clothing boutiques, bars and chic cafés.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Rydal Water

Despite its diminutive size at just over 1 km long, Rydal Water’s strong literary connections have cemented its status as one of the Lake District’s most visited spots. Wordsworth’s Seat, overlooking the western bank, was renowned as the poet’s favorite viewpoint, while nearby points of interest include Nab Cottage, once home to Thomas Quincey and three of Wordworth’s former homes – White Moss House, Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage.One of the few boat-free lakes, Rydal Water makes a perfect spot for open-air swimming during the warmer months, while the lakeside hills are at their most beautiful in spring and autumn, when fields of wildflowers and colorful foliage add a rich range of hues.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

North Yorkshire Moors Railway

Welcome aboard the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, a historic rail line in North England. When it first opened in 1835 trains were originally horse drawn, except at a steep incline where they were hauled by rope. It wasn’t until 1845 that steam engines came into the picture.When first created it served as a trade link, today it’s Britain’s most popular heritage steam railway carrying more than 300-thousand annual visitors along 18 miles of railway. In addition to rolling through impressive scenery in the heart of the North York Moors National Park, each station along the line takes passengers on a trip back in time depicting a year from 1912 to 1952. But the “celebrity station’ is Goathland, maybe better known as Hogsmeade. The station was transformed into Hogsmeade station for the first Harry Potter film.

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Sights & Landmarks

Up at The O2

Stretching 190 meters across the famous dome of London’s O2 Arena in Greenwich, the O2 Skywalk, or ‘Up at The O2’ as it was more recently renamed, offers visitors a way to get their kicks without even setting foot inside. The landmark stadium has transformed its yellow-flagged rooftop with a vertigo-inducing fabric walkway suspended some 53-meters off the ground and offering an incredible panoramic view from its central observation platform. This is no mere rooftop stroll though – participants are decked out with climbing suits, special shoes and safety harnesses as they make the ascent in groups of 15 attached to a central safety wire, and with the climb being compared to a scaling a long open-air trampoline, it won’t just be the vistas that get your adrenaline flowing.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Aysgarth Falls

Immortalized on-screen in Kevin Costner’s Robin Hood Prince of Thieves and famously inspiring artists and poets like Ruskin, Turner and Wordsworth, the Aysgarth Falls have long been renowned as a local beauty spot. The three-tiered falls are undeniably photogenic, with thousands of gallons of water cascading down a series of natural limestone steps and framed by a canopy of trees.The scenic falls lie on the River Ure at the heart of the Yorkshire Dales National Park and make a popular destination for hikers, with a number of trails running through the surrounding woodlands and a walking route following the length of the falls. The falls are most impressive during the wetter months, when the water levels are highest, and strategically placed viewing decks offer expansive views over the landscape.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Sir John Soane's Museum

One of London’s most fascinating yet often-overlooked museums, Sir John Soane’s Museum is dedicated to its namesake, the much-celebrated neo-classical architect who designed a number of acclaimed Regency-era buildings including, most famously, the Bank of England. The museum, housed across three purpose-built houses in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, Central London, was the personal project and one-time home of Soane, designed to inspire and showcase his works to budding architects and students. Opening to the public after his death in 1837, the museum, although recently restored, remains true to Soane’s original design and displays over 20,000 architectural drawings and models.The building itself is also part of Soane’s work, with highlights including a unique geometric staircase and an exquisite mirrored dome ceiling in the Breakfast Room.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian’s Wall was built in the 2nd century AD during the reign of the emperor for whom it was named. At the time it marked the northernmost limit of the Roman Empire.The stone fortifications, stretching between present-day Newcastle and Carlisle, represent the greatest monument of Roman Britain and are protected as a UNESCO World Heritage site.The longest preserved stretches of wall are between the towns of Chollerford and Walton, while along its route you will find the remains of numerous forts as well as a temple dedicated to the goddess Mithras at Carrawburgh.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Captain Cook Memorial Museum

Chronicling the life and times of the iconic explorer, the Captain Cook Memorial Museum offers fascinating insight into Whitby's most famous former resident. Housed in the 17th-century home where a young James Cook took on his apprenticeship as a seaman, the museum’s star attraction is Cook’s attic room, decked out in period furnishings. At the museum, visitors can learn about Cook's now-legendary voyages through a fascinating collection of artifacts, letters, ship models and maps. Pore over original letters written by Cook and his crew; follow his travels through maps and charts; see items brought back from Cook's long journeys to New Zealand and the Pacific Islands; and admire paintings of the voyages by Parkinson, Hodges and Webber.

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Sights & Landmarks

Bond Street

The most exclusive shopping street in London, Bond Street is where you’ll find flagship stores for brands like Burberry and Bvlgari, Dior and Louis Vuitton. Officially split up into two streets that run between Oxford Street and Piccadilly in London’s West End, the southern section, known as Old Bond Street, was built in the 1680s under the command of Sir Thomas Bond, while the longer northern section, New Bond Street, was built 40 years later.Since its inception, Bond Street has been the playground of London society’s most stylish and influential people, and former residents include Admiral Horatio Nelson and Lady Emma Hamilton. Today, Bond Street continues to be one of the most expensive strips of real estate in the world, and the Georgian and Victorian townhouses are famously home to Aspreys of London — jewelers to the royal family — and the capital’s most upscale art galleries and high-end antique stores.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Chatsworth House

Set within a 105-acre estate, the magnificent Tudor mansion of Chatsworth House dates back to the 1560s, and remains the seat of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire to this day. The regal country estate is now one of England’s most popular stately homes and hosts an array of events throughout the year, most notably Christmas at Chatsworth, the Chatsworth Country Fair and the Dodson & Horrell Chatsworth International Horse Trials. It’s also served as a filming location for a number of TV shows and movies, most memorably the BBC adaptation of Jane Austin’s Pride and Prejudice. Visitors to Chatsworth House can tour over 30 rooms, including the lavish bedrooms, State Rooms and Painted Hall, and marvel over the acclaimed collection of art, which includes everything from ancient Roman sculptures and Rembrandt masterpieces, to striking Lucian Freud paintings and ground-breaking contemporary installations.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Brick Lane

So infamous is the East London Street of Brick Lane that there was even an award winning novel and movie penned with the same name. The street, running from Bethnal Green to Whitechapel via the equally famous Spitalfields, has a rich multicultural history, first as home to a sizable Jewish population and more recently, as a settlement for many of London’s Bangladeshi immigrants. These days, Brick Lane and its surroundings are renowned for showcasing the eclectic and retro arts and fashions of the East End, as well as the being the destination of choice for curry lovers.Brick Lane has earned itself a reputation as the go-to destination for sourcing vintage threads, with its annual Alternative Fashion Week cementing its status as an innovative and fashion-forward region of up and coming designers. Vintage stores and retro boutiques are dotted along the street, alongside a growing population of young, local designers, but the real draw cards are the weekly markets.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Crummock Water

Despite being the largest and central lake of the Buttermere Valley, Crummock Water is often overlooked in favor of neighboring Buttermere Lake, but there are plenty of good reasons to visit both. Measuring around 4 km in length, hiking around the lake from Buttermere takes around 3 hours and takes in highlights like Scale Force, England’s highest waterfall, which feeds into the lake, and the view from the lakeside Rannerdale Knotts.Rowing, kayaking and canoeing are all popular pastimes on Crummock Water, but the clear waters are also ideal for swimming during the summer months and the abundance of brown trout and salmon make it a popular choice for fishing.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Royal Albert Dock

Liverpool’s wealth came from the shipping trade over the centuries, and the city’s maritime legacy is celebrated at the revitalized waterfront area known as Albert Dock.The dock is lined with sturdy five-story warehouses, restored and reinvigorated to house boutiques, museums, restaurants and bars. The mix of Victorian-era cast-iron columns, Grade I-listed buildings and waterfront walkways creates an evocative atmosphere, where the past seamlessly melds with the present. There’s plenty to do at Albert Dock, the location of many of Liverpool’s most popular attractions. View contemporary art at the Tate Liverpool gallery, delve into seafaring history at the Merseyside Maritime Museum, or take a poignant journey through the history of the slave trade at the International Slavery Museum. The Beatles Story is also at Albert Dock, a must-do for music fans of all ages.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Coniston Water

The third-largest lake in the English Lake District doesn’t fail to impress; at 5 miles (8 km) long, 184 feet (56 m) deep and half a mile (0.8 km) wide, it has been a favorite of kayak and canoe aficionados for several decades now and continues to entice visitors seeking stunning scenery and a feel for the much-hyped Lake District. Once the main fish source for the monks of Furness Abbey in the 13th century, it is now the home of the elegant, Victorian-era steam yacht Gondola, which sails from one end of the lake to the other between March and November.Around the lake, there are three main villages, Coniston, Brantwood and Hawkshead, where visitors can sleep, eat, drink and shop as they please. Hawkshead is particularly lovely and easy to explore on foot, featuring charming cobble lanes and the fan-favorite Beatrix Potter Gallery.

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Sights & Landmarks

Jermyn Street

Located in the heart of St. James in the City of Westminster in London, Jermyn Street is one of London’s most historic and fashionable districts. Dating back to 1664, it was dominated by the Church of St. James and lined with houses, hotels, schools and taverns. Today, it has developed a reputation for high quality British artistry and craftsmanship and is home to the finest tailors, shirt makers, leather suppliers, food and wine merchants and art galleries in the city. It is also where you will find the 70 seat Jermyn Theatre, the smallest in the West End.Named after Henry Jermyn, who is widely regarded as the founder of London’s West End, Jermyn Street has been home to notable Brits such as Sir William Stanley, Sir John Churchill, Sir Isaac Newton, William Pitt, Sir Walter Scott and William Gladstone.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Beatrix Potter Gallery and Hawkshead

For over a hundred years, characters like Jemima Puddle-Duck, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle and Peter Rabbit have made an indelible impression on children in Britain and beyond. Their creator, author Beatrix Potter, is intimately connected with the Lake District and this charming, compact gallery celebrates that bond with a display of original drawings showing the genesis of her books, which she wrote and illustrated herself.The Beatrix Potter Gallery is housed in a 17th century building which was once the office of Potter’s solicitor husband, William Heelis, and is situated in the town of Hawkshead. Exhibits also tell the life story of Potter herself and her commitment to conserving the natural beauty of the Lake District.

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Sights & Landmarks

Bibury

Bibury is a village in the Cotswolds of England and the perfect place to enjoy the beauty of Gloucestershire. It lies along the River Coln, which is a tributary of the River Thames. Visitors can stroll down Arlington Row to admire cottages that were built in the late 1300s as monastic wool stores. In the 17th century, they were covered into the weavers' cottages you see today. Many of the ornate buildings have protection status, and this row of cottages is featured on the inside cover of all United Kingdom passports. It has also been used in television and movie filming, such as Bridget Jones Diary.Bibury is also rich in natural and wildlife attractions. Rack Isle, which is named for where wool was once hung to dry on racks, is a water meadow that provides an important home for many plants and birds. Here you can see mallards, coots, moorhens, water voles, marsh orchids, flag irises, and marsh marigolds.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Beatles Story

Beatles fans come from across the universe to pay tribute to the Fab Four at Liverpool’s Beatles Story.From the Cavern Club to Abbey Road, this incredibly popular museum tells the story of Liverpool’s four most famous sons, their music, achievements, and massive impact on popular culture since the 1960s.Taking you on an atmospheric, multimedia journey, the Beatles Story features exhibitions of memorabilia, audio rooms, a replica of the Cavern, the interactive Discovery Zone, solo exhibits, Fab4 store and coffee shop.While you’re visiting, listen to the free living history audio guide for a self-guided tour of the exhibits. Highlights include John Lennon’s iconic round spectacles and George Harrison’s much-loved first guitar.Your ticket also gives you entry to the multimedia Fab4D theater experience at the branch of the museum at the Pier Head Mersey Ferry Terminal.

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Sights & Landmarks

Soho

Soho is one of London's most famous areas. Bounded by Charing Cross Road, Oxford Street, Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue, it's a close-knit tangle of busy streets with some of London's best cafes (Bar Italia), music venues (Ronnie Scott's), pubs (the French House), shops, nightclubs and history. Once famed as a seedy red-light area, now it's a cultural hub, full of actors, artists, musicians, and the center of London's gay scene.In summer, people flock to lovely Soho Square to loll on the lawn. In winter, stroll Carnaby Street and famous Liberty department store for fashion, or eat decadent cakes at Princi in Wardour Street. Sit outside Bar Italia and celebrity spot, especially before and after theater shows on the nearby Shaftesbury Avenue.

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