Crystal Compass

Travel Today in Caribbean & Bermuda

Explore Caribbean & Bermuda

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

Photo by Yogi Misir on Unsplash

Caribbean & Bermuda

 

Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

Top Attractions

Water Activities & Tours

Baie Rouge Beach

One of the most famous but under-visited beaches in St Maarten, Baie Rouge (Red Beach) is picturesque with its signature red sand and rock formations. Found in the Lowlands area of the country, these shores are in a neighborhood residential area, which means it remains relatively quiet. It also sits between two rocky bluffs that seclude the serene area. At the edge of the beach, young people are often found jumping off the rocks into the sea, while others don snorkel gear to head out looking for fish. On the half-mile-long strip of sand, it is common to see topless sunbathers out enjoying the weather.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Baby Beach

Baby Beach, so-called for its bathtub-like waters that are shallow enough for young children, is a sheltered man-made lagoon on the southeastern tip of Aruba. The water is only as deep as 5 ft (1.5 m) and the soft sand is friendly to bare feet, making it a popular place for locals and tourists alike. This beach is best suited for families with young children and people new to snorkeling. The shallow, calm waters offer a safe environment in which all beachgoers can enjoy their day at the shore.

Learn More

Land Activities & Tours

Maho & Mullet Bay

Find Saint Martin’s main airport on a map and you've found Maho Beach. How close is it, you ask? Well, if you’ve ever seen a photo of sunbathing tourists gawping as 747s approach the runway just yards above their heads, it was probably taken here. So come by all means and get your own snap, but you may well find that the roar of engines and the smell of jet fuel deters you from staying too long. Thankfully things are calmer on Mullet Bay Beach, a short walk away. This is the tropical paradise you've always dreamed of: white sands, swaying palms, clear water. Waves can get surprisingly high here, making it a magnet for the island’s surfers. Mullet Bay is also the site of the island’s only 18-hole golf course.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Frigate Bay

Outside of the southeastern peninsula of St. Kitts, Frigate Bay has long been considered the best beach on the island. Located just 3 miles from Basseterre, there is something going on day or night all year round. Swimming, windsurfing, kayaking, jet skiing and beach volleyball are all popular activities at this golden sand beach. After nightfall, the beach bars of South Frigate Bay come alive. Live music, dancing, bonfires, karaoke, food and fun alternate on different nights of the week. This section of the beach also hosts the annual St. Kitts Music Festival. The western end of the beach is home to various sports bars, restaurants and nightclubs for visitors and locals seeking some excitement. Things really heat up with events sponsored by area businesses that coincide with the end of semester at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (mud wrestling, anyone?).

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Antilla Shipwreck

The waters of Aruba are lined with shipwrecks, thanks to the treacherous rock outcroppings that the Caribbean has long been notorious for. Luckily, these shipwrecks make for great tourist attractions and amazing dive and snorkeling sites, as they play host to scores of marine life, as well as enticing historical stories of bygone eras. The Antilla Shipwreck is Aruba’s most popular shipwreck site, named after the SS Antilla – a Hamburg America Line cargo ship. Launched in 1939, the poor Antilla operated for less than a year before running aground. Today, however, it makes for a great snorkeling and diving opportunity, as it acts as a safe-haven for the abundant sea life of the Caribbean, and lobster, sea turtles and manta rays are regularly seen here.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Queen's Staircase

You might be surprised to find out that the most visited attraction in Nassau is a 31 m (102 ft) staircase. But the staircase's value resides not just in its 65 steps, but in its importance to Bahamian cultural history. The steps were carved out of solid limestone by slaves sometime between 1793 and 1794; a century later the staircase was renamed to honor the 65 year reign of Queen Victoria as well as her role in helping bring about the abolition of slavery in the Bahamas. Today, come and marvel at the serene majesty of the steep, sloping staircase, still considered a remarkable construction feat. In order to carve the steps, the slaves had to cut through the rocks with axes and other sharp hand tools. The staircase leads to the back of Fort Fincastle.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Arashi Beach

One of the northernmost beaches on the island, Arashi Beach is a somewhat secluded spot popular with serious divers and sunbathers alike. Arashi is also ideal for those looking to swim and snorkel due to its soft sandy bottom and generally calm surf. Many visitors choose to stop here on their way to the nearby California Lighthouse, located at the northwestern tip of Aruba. To serious divers, Arashi Beach is known as the final resting spot of the WWII German freighter, Antilla. The ship has settled close to shore and is even visible above the surface at times. Another treasure found underwater here is elkhorn coral, which makes up a significant part of the reef and is a favorite of snorkelers.

Learn More

Land Activities & Tours

Port Zante

Like its neighbor Nevis, St. Kitts is a Caribbean haven in the Leeward Islands. Miami is around 2,100km (1,300 miles) away, and nearby islands include St. Barts and Antigua. You’ll dock at Port Zante in the historic capital, Basseterre, towards the island’s southern tip. The port’s sparkling-new facilities include restaurants and boutiques, jewelry shops, souvenirs and a duty-free plaza. How to Get to Basseterre Downtown Basseterre is just a 15-minute stroll away from Port Zante. If you take a taxi, agree on the fare upfront as cabs don’t tend to be metered. Minibuses also takes passengers downtown. If you’re driving, keep a lookout for goats, cows and other wildlife that might wander into your path. St. Kitts’ tourism operations are based at the port, a good spot to pick up maps and island information.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Palm Beach

The 2 mi (3.2 km) long Palm Beach is best known as the home of Aruba's high-rise hotels. A bustling and ever expanding tourist attraction, the beach is covered with sunbathing vacationers, food and drink stands, and booths of water sport operators. There are also two piers lined with restaurants and shops, which offer entertainment as well as some much needed shade. This stretch of beach, northwest of the capital Oranjestad, is the hub for day and nighttime activities. The trendiest place in Aruba, Palm Beach is where you go for great snorkeling as well as good people-watching.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Maho Beach

Maho Beach can't boast that it's one of the most peaceful beaches in the world, but it certainly has a unique claim to fame, particularly if you're an aviation lover. This is because Maho Beach is located right next to an airport and the planes fly directly over the beach so low that you feel they might land on you. Kids especially love watching the planes soar overhead multiple times throughout the day at Maho Beach, but even adults quickly get caught up in the wonder of seeing a large inflight plane so close up. Hang out by the fence on the edge of the beach closest to the airport and you'll even be able to feel the blast of the jets as a plane takes off – and probably some sand particles being swirled up around you. In addition to plane watching, Maho Beach is a fun place to swim and snorkel.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Doctor's Cave Beach

Occupying a spot of Montego Bay’s “hip strip,” Doctor’s Cave Beach is the best-known beach in Jamaica. It's a top party destination with plenty of sand-and-sea-centric activities available at good rates. Its white sand descends into the turquoise of the Caribbean, as beachgoers soak up sun in a tropical paradise. Rent a beach umbrella and unwind with a can of Red Stripe, or grab some snorkel gear and marvel at the stunning variety of marine life in water so clear you can see all the way to the bottom. Doctor’s Cave Beach provides easy access to the 15-acre Montego Bay Marine Park, and you can also rent Jet skis, parasailing and glass bottom boat rides from private operators located nearby. When you’re done with all your sea and shore activities, you’re just a short walk from the restaurants and bars in one of Jamaica’s hottest entertainment districts.

Learn More

 

See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

Top Attractions

Wildlife & Zoos

Asa Wright Nature Centre

In the field of eco-tourism, the Asa Wright Nature Centre was well ahead of the curve, having been a sanctuary for wildlife since 1967. It is famous the world over for the staggering variety of birds which pass through, often on their way to or from nearby continental South America. From Ornate Hawk-eagles to the nocturnal Oilbird and the psychedelic plumage of dozens of tropical species, there is enough here to make a birdwatcher of any skeptic. The center was once a coffee and cocoa plantation, and you can still enjoy lunch or high tea on the broad shady veranda of its old colonial house. Get the most out of your visit by taking a tour; expert guides will be able to point out not just birds but also the huge range of butterflies as well as lizards and other fauna.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

National Heroes Park

Kingston’s largest green space is National Heroes Park, a 50-acre former horse track that now features monuments to important figures from Jamaican history. Among them are monuments and tombs to people like Marcus Garvey, Normal Manley and Sir Alexander Bustamante, among many others. There’s also a war memorial to Jamaicans who died in WWI, which was relocated here from an earlier locations, and it’s the site of memorial gatherings on Remembrance Day.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains create the longest mountain range on the island of Jamaica and constitute one of the longest continuous mountain ranges in the Caribbean. Blue Mountain Peak is the highest peak on the island and rises an impressive 7,402 feet (2,256 meters) above sea level. Stretching for 28 miles (45 kilometers), the mountain range spans the rugged and scenic eastern region of Jamaica and offers views of the island’s north and south coasts. On a clear day, you can see across the Caribbean all the way to Cuba. The Blue Mountains are one of the most spectacular natural attractions on the island of Jamaica and are a major draw for nature lovers. The region is home to a wide variety of flora and fauna including Jamaica’s national tree, the Blue Mahoe; and the giant swallowtail, the second-largest butterfly in the world. The temperature in the mountains is noticeably cooler than down at sea level and the layer of mist that shrouds the peaks gives the mountains their bluish tint.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Caroni Swamp

Caroni Swamp is a 12,000-acre swamp situated just south of Port of Spain on Trinidad & Tobago’s west coast. Being the second largest mangrove wetlands on the island and the natural nesting home for one of the country’s national birds, Caroni Swamp is protected under the Ramsar Convention as a wetland of international importance. The swamp runs along the banks of the Caroni River and features a maze of channels and lagoons. The central section is designated as a wildlife sanctuary, with the mangrove trees providing the ideal nesting place for the distinctive Scarlet Ibis birds, along with around 100 species of migratory birds, making it perfect for birdwatchers. The main attraction for nature lovers occurs just before sunset, when the ritualistic roosting habits of thousands of the brightly-colored Ibis can be observed close-up. The birds fly in unison to feed and nest here, creating a dazzling cloud of red against the evening sky.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Concord Falls

This waterfall site has not one but three separate streams to visit—from a 35-foot cascade right as you enter the falls area to two larger waterfalls that require a hike through the forest reserve. The first waterfall is accessible via a paved path with handrails and is worth making the visit to for the sight alone. The natural pools here make for a refreshing swim. The forests are popular for hiking among large boulders, creeks and trees. The winding path leads through a nutmeg plantation, first visiting the second waterfall named “Au Coin” before finally reaching the farthest waterfall (“Fontainebleu”), which towers 65 feet over the ground below. It takes approximately an hour to reach the final waterfall, and while it is possible to swim in the clear, small pools underneath the falls, visitors are advised to watch the currents.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Natural Pool

The Natural Pool is a tucked away basin formed by rock and volcanic stone circles that fills with ocean water. The pool is also known locally as "Conchi" or "Cura di Tortuga," because it is said that the pool was once used to hold sea turtles before they were sold (tortuga means turtle in Papiamento, the official language of the Caribbean). Visitors can swim and snorkel here, although the area is really not that big. On calm days, the pool is great for a dip, but keep in mind that swimming here is risky when waves leap the rock barrier.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Negril Cliffs

Even by themselves, the black hued cliffs outside of Negril are natural sites to behold. Rising 40 feet above turquoise waters and pockmarked by sea caves and coves, the cliffs form a defining natural icon for Jamaica’s far western coast. It isn’t just their beauty, however, that draws visitors here in droves. Rather, it’s the deep waters immediately offshore and the presence of cliffside beach bars—which all combine to form perfect conditions for throwing yourself off the edge. The cliff diving here on Negril’s cliffs is some of the world’s most famous, where locals and visitors regularly drop over 40 feet down to the sea. Professionals will often put on shows and perform daring flips and flops, and occasionally visitors will join in the show in a fit of Caribbean bravado. The cliffs are a popular spot for snorkeling tours to stop en route from the dive site, and are a short distance from the laidback guesthouses towards the southern end of Negril.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Stingray City Antigua

Stingray City in Antigua is a special place as it is home to a plethora of stingrays in their natural habitat. Plus, the area of sea where Stingray City is situated is quite shallow and is only a few feet deep in many parts, making it an ideal excursion for families with children in addition to traveling adults or those who can’t swim well. Though Stingray City in Antigua is a cordoned-off area, the stingrays are still in their natural habitat. The gentle creatures are accustomed to humans so they are quite friendly, and visitors can watch them float through the water. Learn how to interact with the stingrays before hopping into the water with snorkel gear to watch them glide around with the chance to touch and play with them.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Monte Cristi National Park

Monte Cristi National Park, or Parque National Monte Cristi, is a national park in the Dominican Republic. It is one of the driest areas in the Dominican Republic, receiving about two inches of rain per year.The area extends from the Haiti border to the tip of Punta Rucia. Monte Cristi includes subtropical dry forests, lagoons, mangrove swamps, beaches and a stunning 777-foot (237-meter) limestone mesa called El Morro that juts up from the water. A trip to Monte Cristi National Park includes a boat ride through the mangroves on which you can look for some of the 160 species of birds that call the area home. Several offshore islands called The Seven Brothers Cays, or Los Cayos Siete Hermanos, are visible from Monte Cristi National Park. In addition to visiting Monte Cristi National Park, the nearby island of Cayo Paraiso is worth a stop.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Stingray City

No, it's not a theme park; Stingray City is a world-famous natural wonder offering intrepid wildlife-lovers the chance to dive with stingrays. Touching and feeding stingrays underwater is a unique experience, combined with diving and snorkeling coral reefs surrounded by tropical fish. Stingray City is a series of shallow sandbars off the north coast of Grand Cayman, between Morgan Harbor and Rum Point in North Sound. The water here is only around 3 feet (1 meter) deep, giving you the unique opportunity to interact with the stingrays. This is one of the highlights of visiting the Cayman Islands, so don't miss it!

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Lucayan National Park

This incredible 40-acre park has some of the most spectacular secluded beaches in all of the Bahamas. Filled with mangrove, pine, and palm trees, Lucayan National Park features incredible plants in bloom as well as a plethora of waterbirds and saltwater fish. Snorkel in the amazing turquoise waters or explore the world's largest underground cavern system. If you're interested in the history of the area, look into a tour of the burial grounds of the indigenous Bahaman people. Surround yourself with true Bahaman beauty in this lovely national park, and enjoy the protective care that its delicate environment demands.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Arikok National Park

Without a doubt one of the premier attractions of Aruba, Arikok National Park comprises about 18 percent of the island’s terrain and contains a variety of the island's natural geologic, historical and landmark attractions. Within Arikok you’ll discover natural caves, lava formations, stunning natural vistas and numerous tidal pools that are great for exploration. Aside from its abundant natural beauty, visitors will also discover important indigenous historical sites, as well as micro-climates that support Aruba’s two snake species and two unique bird species, which are found here on Aruba and nowhere else in the world.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Christoffel National Park

Curacao’s largest nature reserve is Christoffel National Park, the ideal place on the island to see the rare Curacao white-tailed deer, native barn owl and wild orchids. The best way to explore is by following one of the park’s 8 hiking trails, graded from easy to challenging. The easiest trail is the 20-minute walk through the white-tailed deer sanctuary. If you’re thinking of going on the relatively arduous climb to the top of Mount Christoffel, head off in the early morning so you avoid the heat of the day. Scenic driving routes lead across the hills to the coastline, or you might like to take a tour of the historic Plantation Savonet within the park’s grounds.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Mayfield Falls

The Mayfield Falls are a series of waterfalls situated on the Mayfield River in the parish of Westmoreland in Jamaica. The falls feature 21 cascades in total. The tallest, nicknamed the ‘Washing Machine’ and reaching around three meters in height, is large enough for visitors to get behind and play in the jets of water. The jungle setting of the falls is abundant with lush plantlife, as well as a variety of exotic species of birds, butterflies, and other wildlife native to Jamaica. Most people set off to the Mayfield Falls with a guide. The level of physical activity here is moderately demanding and involves quite a walk through the water and across rocks to explore the falls in their entirety.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Shete Boka National Park

Shete Boke National park offers rocky coastal views and wild wind-lashed landscapes bordering Christoffel National Park. There are beaches tucked away on the rocky limestone coast, where three species of sea turtles lay their eggs. At Boka Tabla, wild waves wash into an undersea cavern. Find a sheltered nook at the entrance to the cavern for a bird’s-eye view of the crashing sea. Scenic one-hour hiking trails wind across the cliff tops for spectacular coastal views.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Grand Etang Lake

The Grand Etang Lake in the central highlands of Grenada was formed in a natural crater of one of the island’s extinct volcanoes. Now filled with bright blue water, multiple waterfalls and creeks flow into the lake, creating a tropical landscape that beckons to be explored. Spanning 36 acres, the lake itself is approximately 20 feet deep. With the presence of native birds, brightly colored reptiles and rare vegetation throughout, it’s impossible not to feel the rain forest climate. Mona monkeys can be seen and heard in the neighboring jungle, while armadillos, mahogany trees, mongooses and rare tropical orchids are other sights to look for. As this is a popular hiking spot, most visitors enjoy taking the trail surrounding the lake or choose from one of many shorter treks through the lush rain forest. It takes approximately an hour and a half to hike the entire loop, but the views are worth it.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Fern Gully

Take a step back into the wilds of Jamaica with a drive through the incredibly lush and tropical Fern Gully. A towering tunnel of ferns and tropical overgrowth, this rainforest is so full and green that it has become one of the most noteworthy attractions in all of Jamaica. See water falling over canyons, beautiful gorges, tropical birds of paradise and more than 300 varieties of fern. Along the way visitors can stop to haggle with roadside vendors for wooden arts and crafts, or, if they’re lucky, they’ll spot Fern Man, who wears a robe of pure fern. With so much green vegetation, this shady forest canopy is a great spot for a quick drive or a leisurely walk.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Damajagua Falls (27 Charcos)

Hidden in a lush jungle, the Damajagua Falls are a series of 27 cascading waterfalls only discovered as recently as the early 1990s. You can climb, jump off and slide down this natural, watery assault course, which can become treacherous after heavy rain. The best way to see the falls is on a tour. Tour guides will take you as far as the 7th waterfall and will provide you with appropriate safety equipment, such as helmets and life jackets. It is possible to explore further than the 7th waterfall but you will need to arrange your own transport from Puerto Plata and a guide and safety equipment upon arrival at the falls.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

El Yunque National Park

El Yunque Rainforest is the only tropical rainforest under the protection of the US Forest Service and also the largest nature reserve in densely-populated Puerto Rico. It is situated in the mist-wreathed Luquillo Mountains where year-round precipitation ensures lush, green landscapes and a healthy diversity of animal life. This includes mongooses, non-venomous snakes, the rare Puerto Rican Parrot and the Coqui frog whose distinctive croak provides El Yunque’s soundtrack.El Portal Rain Forest Center provides a good introduction to the area. There you can pick up a map and set out on well-defined walking trails which will take you past such sights as the La Coca Falls and the observation points of Yokahú Tower and Mount Britton Lookout Tower.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

YS Falls

YS Falls is a stunning ecosystem located on the lush, south coast of Jamaica. Often overshadowed by its Jamaica waterfall rival, Dunn’s River Falls, YS is worth a visit simply for its more secluded location, 50 miles southwest of Montego Bay and 50 miles east of Negril. The precise location of YS Falls is actually on a working cattle farm called YS Estate, where visitors get the chance to see a glimpse of Jamaican countryside farm life as they make their way to YS Falls. From YS Estate, you’ll take a jitney tractor to YS Falls, which flows into the Black River. Once at the water, you’ll encounter natural swimming pools adjacent to the cascading falls, as well as the surrounding tropical jungle, which provide opportunities for zip-lining. There are wooden walkways along the riverbank for those who would rather continue their adventure on ground level, and the river provides other fun activities such as tubing down the small rapids.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Devil's Bridge National Park

Don't be scared away by its rather ominous name. Devil's Bridge National Park is one of the most unique natural sites that you can see, not just in Antigua, but perhaps ever. Devil's Bridge is a natural arch carved by the sea out of the soft and hard limestone ledges of the cliffs. As enormous breakers from the Atlantic repeatedly assaulted the rocks throughout the years, they eventually eroded away a soft part of limestone to create a bridge-like arch. The bridge gained its name from the tragic events that took place there long ago. Supposedly, slaves would hurl themselves off the bridge into the rough waters below in an attempt to escape from their enslaved lives. It was soon said that the Devil must be present there. Today the bridge is free from such tragedy, but is still a hauntingly beautiful place to visit. With the wild surrounding shrubbery and huge howling waves, there is an almost frighteningly rugged natural beauty to the bridge and its surrounding area.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

White River

White River Valley prides itself on its eco credentials, offering all manner of outdoor adventures. The white limestone rocks give the White River its name, causing the water to tumble over rapids and forming tranquil lagoon pools for rafting. You can go tubing or kayaking in the White River, or even saddle a horse for a ride along trails leading through tropical rainforest! Visit the landscaped Village of Flowers, and seek out the old Spanish Bridge dating back to the 1600s.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Grand Etang National Park

The hikers’ favorite, Grand Etang preserves the nutmeg groves and tropical rainforest of Grenada’s central highland. At the park’s heart is the crater lake that gives the park its name, Grand Etang Lake. A network of walking trails meanders away from the lake, through the park, around the lake and towards the coast via the Concord Falls. Choose from 20-minute ambles to multi-hour treks. You’ll be greeted by local monkeys at the visitor center, where you can pick up walking trail leaflets on park destinations like Seven Sisters Falls and Mt Qua Qua. While walking, see if you can spot mahogany trees, hummingbirds, frogs, lizards, mongoose, armadillos, tropical flowers, caribs and hawks.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

National Park of the East (Parque Nacional del Este)

The sandy beaches of Saona island are a highlight of a visit to Parque Nacional del Este, along with the tropical moist forest and limestone karst landscape of the mainland. The range of biodiversity preserved in this park is incredible, including more than 570 species of plants and 163 species of birds. Much of this habitat is found in the mangroves fringing the peninsula and the sea grasses wafting in the water. The offshore coral reefs are popular with divers.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Gros Piton

Saint Lucia is one of the most mountainous Caribbean islands and of its numerous peaks the ones which will most surely stick in your mind are the Pitons. Together they’re the country’s number one landmark, but these aren’t so much 'mountains' in the normal sense, as dramatic, conical outcrops looming over the sea. Gros Piton is the larger of the two (the other one being – logically enough – Petit Piton). It’s a popular climbing destination but a glance at its steep slopes will tell you it’s no walk in the park, especially in the tropical heat. But if you’ve got some climbing experience, your ascent to the 2,619 foot (786 meter) summit will reward you with awe-inspiring views of the sapphire blue sea and lush green coastline.

Learn More

 

Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

Top Attractions

Cultural/Heritage Places

San Juan National Historic Site (Sitio Histórico Nacional de San Juan)

Established in 1949, The San Juan National Historic Site is home to some of the city’s most famous attractions. Visitors can climb to Castillo San Felibe del Morro, overlooking the San Juan Bay, for an up close look at military efforts more than 250 years ago. Travelers can learn about historic battles that took place against the English and Dutch while visiting the restored lighthouse, chapel and vintage cannons.History buffs will also love Castillo San Cristobal, near the gate of Old San Juan. While El Morro protected Puerto Rico from seaside attacks, Castillo San Cristobal was designed to stop intruders approaching by land. With grounds stretching some 27 acres, this is Puerto Rico’s largest fortification site, as well as the biggest built by the Spanish after discovering the New World.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

The Capitol of Puerto Rico (El Capitolio)

This classic capitol in the heart of San Juan is home to the Legislative Assembly, House or Representatives, the Senate and a whole lot of Puerto Rican history. Visitors to this regal site, which officially opened in 1907, will find massive marble columns, ornate stonework and a brightly colored capitol dome, in addition to the Architecture and Construction Archives of the University of Puerto Rico. These include rare ink and cloth sketches, as well as the original 38 blue print plans for the structure. Visitors say this classic building is a major departure from the rest of the old city, but a few hours wandering the halls, learning about Puerto Rican history and politics is a worthy addition to any San Juan visit.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Fort Shirley

Tucked away in a corner of the northern peninsula in Dominica, a little garrison called Fort Shirley sits on the protected national park of Cabrits Surrounded by pristine Caribbean wildlife, tropical forests and coral reefs, Fort Shirley is a prime example of Caribbean fortresses built in the 18th century and makes for some of the easiest and most scenic hikes on the island of Dominica. Originally erected by the British to defend against invading forces like the French and Dutch, the garrison was later abandoned and then restored to its Colonial prime in 1989. Today, visitors can hike the lush lawns, see the panoramic vistas of the harbour from the cannon walls and experience the history of the Caribbean and its colonial roots first hand on a guided tour.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

Bushiribana Gold Mill Ruins

The desert interior of the Caribbean island of Aruba is never more interesting than when visiting the Bashiribana Gold Mill Ruins. Set among the stark beauty of the Aruban desert and the blue Caribbean sky, the ruins are the stone remains of an old gold smelter. Established by gold prospectors hundreds of years ago and once considered sacred by the Arawak Indians, this is a serene and unexpected step into the history of Aruba and a great exploratory photo opportunity for those that love history, desert beauty or just good old-fashioned exploration.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Natural Bridge

A testament to the power of the elements, the Natural Bridge of Aruba was created from the strength of the ocean carving through thick coral limestone. Thousands of years of water and wind pushing at the coral had created an opening in it that allowed the ocean waves to get through while leaving a layer on top that people could walk across. The location also boasted excellent views of nearby and ruggedly handsome Andicuri Beach. Sadly, on September 2, 2005, the power of nature and erosion finally won out and the bridge that thousands had marveled at collapsed in the early morning hours. Before its demise, the Natural Bridge was the largest nature created bridge in the Caribbean, stretching across more than 100 feet and rising 23 feet above the sea. The rocky remains of the bridge can still be seen and are located a short distance from the popular Natural Pool in Aruba, another nature-made wonder that is a large swimming hole located amongst huge rocks right next to the sea.

Learn More

Religious Sites

Alto Vista Chapel

Little could be more picturesque or more Caribbean chic than the Alto Vista Chapel on Aruba. With the big Caribbean sky and peaceful sea as your backdrop, the Alto Vista Chapel, or “Pilgrims Church,” is one of the most photographed attractions on the island. Built by Spanish missionaries in 1750, the Alto Vista Chapel still conducts services and is said to be the oldest continuously operating church in the Caribbean. Sitting alone on a hill on an island in the Caribbean, the scene is instantly inspiring, and the grounds and gardens immaculately manicured. Easily one of the nicest stops while out exploring Aruba, the Alto Vista Chapel is not to be missed.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Government House

Built in 1806, the Government House is considered by many to be the leading example of Georgian Colonial architecture in all the West Indies. Its vibrant exterior gives this traditional building that sits atop Mount Fitzwilliam a uniquely island vibe, with a coral-colored paintjob that nods to Nassau’s famous conch. An impressive entryway, towering Ionic columns and a proud statue of Christopher Columbus lend a noble air to the mansion the visiting representative of the Queen calls home. Climb the hilltop for breathtaking views of Paradise Island or hang around the gates to catch the changing of the guards—both offer photo ops that are uniquely Nassau.

Learn More

Religious Architecture

San Juan Cathedral (Catedral de San Juan Bautista)

Built in 1521, The San Juan Cathedral (aka La Santa Catedral San Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico) is one of the highlights of any trip into Old San Juan. The second oldest cathedral in the Americas, this historic landmark lies right in the heart of Old San Juan and boasts an impressive array of religious and historical artifacts including the tomb of notorious Spanish conquistador Ponce de Leon and the mummy of St. Pio. An operational cathedral, you can attend mass here Saturdays at 7 pm, Sunday at 9 and 11 am, and weekdays 7:25 am and 12:15 pm. And experience a traditional catholic mass, or, when service isn’t being conducted, you can wander the nave free of charge, gaze at the huge stained glass windows, or marvel at the construction of the oldest church on U.S. soil.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Amber Museum (Museo Del Ámbar)

Housed in a fine Victorian mansion with an interesting history of its own, the Amber Museum (Museo de Ambar Dominicano) is worth a visit to see some rare and fascinating amber pieces and to understand more about this semi-precious gem. Formed out of the fossilized resin of ancient trees some 25 to 40 million years ago, the resin (that in its pressed form becomes amber) perfectly preserved whatever it covered. Amber-covered fossils, such as insects and plant remains are still being discovered today. There are thousands of specimens at the Amber Museum, but one of its finest has to be a perfectly conserved 40cm (15.8in) lizard encased in a 42.5cm (16.7in) length of amber. The entire collection has good bi-lingual signage and English and Spanish-speaking guides are available to take you through the museum and relay the story of the Bentz family, the original owners of the mansion.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Betty's Hope Historic Sugar Plantation

Betty's Hope Sugar Plantation is the historic site of the first large sugar plantation on Antigua, built during the late 1600s by Sir Christopher Codrington who named it after his daughter. All that remains today are the ruins of a stillhouse and two large stone windmills, one of which has been restored, with working gears, crushing rollers and a sail all built to period specifications. The local government is developing the area as an open-air museum, and a small visitor’s center offers information about how sugar cane was processed here, and about the hardships of the African slaves who toiled in its production.</)

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Castillo San Felipe del Morro

Just north of the Old San Juan district, within the San Juan National Historic Site, lies Castillo San Felipe del Morro, a 16th-century citadel, or fortress.It is a World Heritage-listed site on the northwestern tip of the islet of San Juan – a perfect spot to keep watch over the Atlantic Ocean and protect Old San Juan and the Bay of San Juan from incoming enemies. Its more recent history includes the American military, which occupied the site from 1898 to 1961.The citadel, surrounded like it is by an expansive green lawn and the dramatic rocky coast, sits on quite a beautiful spot; the imposing fortress walls create an interesting contrast to the sparkling blue sea. When the wind blows, the lawn that connects the citadel to the town is a popular kite-flying spot.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Blackbeard's Castle (Skytsborg Tower)

High above Charlotte Amalie is Skytsborg (“sky tower”), a round defensive tower built by the Danish in 1679 to watch for enemy ships which might attack Fort Christian and other harbor settlements. While there was a real pirate called Blackbeard (Edward Teach) who prowled nearby waters, his association with the site owes more to tradition than history. And anyway, who needs a history lesson when you have one of the great Caribbean views laid out before you. The visual feast encompasses dramatic green slopes, bobbing yachts, hulking cruise ships and outlying islands. Facilities at the site include a swimming pool and snack bar.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Fort Charlotte

High atop a hillside overlooking the harbor of Nassau is the British-colonial Fort Charlotte—the largest fort in Nassau. Constructed in the late 18th century for a battle that never took place, this historic site offers picturesque views, hidden underground passages, a waterless mote, remote dungeons and even authentic canons. Guides are available to help travelers navigate through subterranean halls far below the fort, but well-place signage and plenty of light means visitors can just as easily explore the grounds on their own.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Mount Gay Rum Visitor Center

Rum is more than a social lubricant here on the island of Barbados. It’s the history, culture, and essence of the island slowly poured over ice. Barbados is considered the birthplace of rum, and Mount Gay distillery—founded in 1703—is believed to be the oldest rum found anywhere in the world. For three centuries sailors and seamen have sipped its amber silk, and during a visit to the Mount Gay Distillery, travelers can literally taste the history that’s shaped Barbados’ past. Learn how sugar cane is fermented into rum, and sample varieties of fine rum with hints of vanilla and almond. Hear the tales of how rum is tied with seafaring, sailing, and pirates, and watch as the liquid is carefully bottled for shipment across the globe. Finally, after watching a film on rum production and hearing the history of Mount Gay, sample the smooth, award-winning rums at the tasting room bar and gift shop.

Learn More

Well-known Landmarks

Castillo San Cristobal

Standing guard at Old San Juan’s Eastern Gate is the Castillo de San Crisotbal. Built to protect San Juan against land attacks, the ancient Spanish fort is now part of the San Juan National Historic Site and a great opportunity to see the largest Spanish fortification built in the New World and see some spectacular views of the San Juan Bay and El Morro. The massive structure, which was built in the 18th century to compliment the El Morro fortification which was designed to guard the bay, rises 150 feet above sea level and occupies most of the northeast edge of Old San Juan. Proven to be an effective fortification which helped repel a 1797 land invasion by Sir Ralph Abercrombie, the Castillo de San Cristobal is one of the premier attractions of Old San Juan.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Fort San Felipe (Fortaleza San Felipe)

Fort San Felipe was built in 1564 by order of Philip II of Spain and is Puerto Plata's oldest surviving building. It was a formidable construction, designed to strike fear into any would-be-invader's heart. Its 2m- (7ft) thick walls, squat doorways and moat filled with sharp coral and swords served to keep people out and, when the fort later became a prison, worked just as effectively at keeping people in - including one of its most notable captives - Juan Pablo Duarte, who served time here in 1844. The tower contains a small museum of wartime artifacts such as guns, artillery shells, and cannonballs. Fort San Felipe's main attraction, however, is its sweeping views across the Atlantic.

Learn More

Religious Sites

St. Nicholas Abbey

The distinctive Dutch gables and red roof of the St. Nicholas Abbey plantation are no historical pastiche. Built in 1660, the beautifully restored mansion is one of only three authentic Jacobean buildings in the western hemisphere. Inside, the plantation’s great house boasts a Chinese Chippendale staircase, antiques, porcelain and much more, viewed on a free guided tour. The sugar plantation surrounding the mansion includes a historic processing plant and the rum distillery that produces St. Nicholas Abbey Rum. Watch a documentary from the 1930s to learn about sugar plantation life, visit Cherry Tree Hill for lovely views over the island’s east coast, try a glass of rum punch, and stay on for lunch at the Terrace Cafe.

Learn More

Museums & Exhibitions

Museum of the Americas (Museo de las Américas)

Preserving the identity of the indigenous cultures of the Americas and, in particular, those that populated the island of Puerto Rico before the Spanish invasion, the Museo de las Americas is a small but powerful museum that not only serves to enlighten, but also to entertain. While wandering the halls here, you’ll find that some exhibits tell the history of the Native Americans, while others display folk art from contemporary artists of the island. Most of these exhibits are available for sale, while other pieces of art serve only for appraisal and admiration. See what originally made Puerto Rico the desirable island it is today with a trip down history lane with the Museo de las Americas.

Learn More

 

Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

Top Attractions

Geological Formations

Rio Camuy Cave Park (Parque Nacional de las Cavernas del Río Camuy)

You don’t have to be a seasoned spelunker to enjoy Río Camuy Cave Park, one of the largest such sites in the world. The caves, sculpted by the underground river from which it derives its name, were only discovered in 1958 and haven’t yet been fully surveyed.The most accessible part is Cueva Clara. Descending into this subterranean chamber, pierced by shafts of sunlight, lined with luxuriant ferns and echoing with bat screeches, is an unforgettable experience.Back on ground level you can peer into the enormous Tres Pueblos Sinkhole or set off on a walking trail to explore more of this thickly-forested area.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Guadirikiri Caves

Hidden amongst Aruba’s famous white sand beaches and tropical waters lies the Guadirikiri Cave system of underground tunnels, filled with centuries old rock formations. Stalagmites and stalactites (along with plenty of fruit bats!) sit quietly in the darkness and dampness of the two chambers. Light passes into the cave only through holes in the ceiling, creating a unique effect and feel. There are also Arawak Indian drawings on the cave walls that provide insight into the history and cultural roots of Aruba. Legend and local folklore has it that the two caves once held a pair of lovers condemned by the girl’s father, an Indian chief, as an unworthy match. It is said that upon their death, their souls vanished to the heavens through the holes in the top of the caves. The main cave chamber stretches nearly 100 feet into the darkness.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Blue Hole

Blue Hole is a natural wonder located near Ocho Rios. A deep cavern within the tropical mountains of Jamaica, Blue Hole gets its name from the deep hue of the water here. This site isn’t just pretty water, though. There are also waterfalls pouring into the hole from the sides and thick vegetation growing around the edges and from crevices in its rocky perimeter. Vines hang down into Blue Hole as well, giving it an even more exotic appearance. It is an excellent place to go swimming and cliff jumping.

Learn More

 

Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

Top Attractions

Wildlife & Zoos

Caroni Bird Sanctuary

Every day, the scarlet ibis, Trinidad & Tobago’s national bird, flies to nearby Venezuela to feed and heads back to its island home in the late afternoon. Watching the birds in their thousands return to roost in the vivid green mangroves of Caroni Swamp, red plumage blazing against the deepening blue sky, is one of the greatest sights the Caribbean has to offer. Take a sunset trip by boat through the serene “canals” and tidal lagoons of the swamp, with guides pointing out snakes, iguanas and other creatures as you glide past. Once anchored, sit back and enjoy the hush of dusk until the return of the ibises.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Encuentro Beach (Playa Encuentro)

Dominican Republic is home to incredible stretches of white sandy beach, expansive all-inclusive resorts and stunning turquoise waters. But it’s also home to some of the Caribbean’s best surfing. Perhaps no spot in DR is better known for its serious waves than Encuentro Beach. Several local surf schools line the beach, where strong winds mean morning is the most ideal time of day to learn. Protected waters and a vibrant local surf scene  make it a top destination for travelers who want to hang ten while staying in Puerto Plata. Five unique breaks known as Coco Pipe, Bobo’s Point, La Izquierda, the Destroyer and Le Derecha offer travelers distinctly different rides, with some of the biggest waves coming from Coco Pipe and the Destroyer. Travelers can opt to explore on their own, or sign up for learn-to surf lessons with one of the local schools, or as part of an organized tour.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Prickly Pear Cays

If you like the idea of getting marooned for a day on an idyllic desert island in the Caribbean, join a boat trip to the Prickly Pear Cays. This pair of uninhabited islets sits six miles northwest of Anguilla, boasting exquisite white-sand beaches, and fringing reefs protected as one Anguilla’s marine protected areas. A day here can include snorkeling among the colorful corals and shipwrecks that are scattered around the cays. Then you can swim ashore to spend a lazy afternoon enjoying the sun and sand, along with a lunch of barbecue ribs and cold cocktails from the on-island restaurants.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Playa Lagun

If you’re looking for an off-the-beaten track beach on Curacao, but don’t want sacrifice on amenities, try Playa Lagun. This protected beach within a deep cove flanked on either side by sheer cliffs is near the northern end of the island, far enough from Willemstad that you can avoid the cruise crowds, and with a small beachfront restaurant that does double duty as a dive shop. Playa Lagun is also well known as one of the best spots for diving and snorkeling from the shore, and you can get scuba tanks or snorkel gear from the dive shop to explore the nearby reefs. And there are plenty of picnic tables where you can relax and have lunch after a morning of swimming, snorkeling and sunbathing.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Magens Bay

Magens Bay is just one of the reasons why the US Virgin Island of St. Thomas is such a popular holiday isle. The island’s favorite beach is a curving arc of white sand and bright blue water. It’s protected by a forested arboretum and palm trees, ensuring calm waves for swimming and kayaking. From the vantage point of Mountain Top, you can easily make out the bay’s unusual rectangular shape and mile of white-sand beach, but the best view is up close from the sand. Being so popular, the beach has some great facilities, including lifeguards, showers, snack stall and windsurf rental. A nature trail winds from Magens Bay Road down the beach, just over a mile, taking you through tropical forest and mangroves via boardwalks and well-maintained steps and paths.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Anse Chastanet Beach and Reef

One of Saint Lucia’s most beautiful beaches, Anse Chastanet enjoys a prime location in a sheltered cove within sight of the distinctive peaks of the Pitons. Much of the immediate hinterland is taken up by the Anse Chastanet resort, a development in harmony with its surrounds which still allows public use of the beach. There are few better places in the world for sipping on something fruity than the beach’s bar, right on the sand. The walk back to your hammock or thatched hut might very well be the only exercise you care to indulge in. But the crystalline waters aren’t just there for resting your eyes on as you recline; you’re just a stone’s throw from a reef known by divers the world over for its superb visibility and huge variety of coral and sea creatures. The dive center at the southern end of the beach is your gateway to this sub-aquatic paradise.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Carlisle Bay

The ancient shipwrecks in this protected natural harbor make Carlisle Bay one of Barbados’ most popular snorkeling and scuba diving destinations. Six sunken vessels dot the ocean floor here and attract hundreds of varieties of tropical fish, stingrays, sea stars and turtles, not to mention curious travelers. In addition to underwater adventures, the nearby Boatyard offers jet skiing, sea trampolines and the opportunity to jump into the ocean via rope swing. Even those who prefer to stay out of the water will love the calm shores and sandy beaches of Carlisle Bay, where countless chair and umbrella rentals make it easy to while away the day here.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Coki Beach

Coki is St. Thomas’s party beach, thronged with families, revelers and beach vendors. Snorkelers and divers love Coki’s underwater clarity and sea creatures. Beach day-trippers enjoy the sand, sunshine and wandering vendors of drinks and snacks, souvenirs, sunscreen and hair-braiding. Coki Beach is quite a scene, lively and fun rather than quiet and laid-back. Beach lounges and thatch umbrellas can be hired, along with all kinds of water sports equipment, from jet skis to snorkel gear. The fish are used to people at this popular beach, and have even been known to eat from your hand (BYO dog biscuits).

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Blue Lagoon Island

This beautiful private island is open to all who wants to experience Bahamian beauty and adventure firsthand. A trip to Blue Lagoon Island promises countless opportunities for fun, whether you want to simply relax by the beach and catch some rays, swim with a dolphin, or venture into the sparkling waters in a sea kayak. Though just a short trip away from Nassau, Blue Lagoon Island offers the peaceful feeling of seclusion that you can only experience on a private island. The nature alone is enough to draw most visitors- whether it's the clear turquoise waters, native coconut palm trees, pristine white sandy beaches, beautiful natural vegetation, tropical birds, or coral reefs teeming with native species of fish. If you get restless after lounging on the beach, there are numerous attractions you can check out. The Dolphin Encounters, where you can swim with dolphins and sea lions, is continually ranked among the most popular attractions in the Bahamas.

Learn More

 

Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

Top Attractions

Fun & Games

Caribelle Batik at Romney Manor

Caribelle Batik is essentially a shop on St Kitts, but a very special one. Located within Romney Manor, a stately estate once owned by the great-great-great grandfather of Thomas Jefferson, Caribelle Batik sells popular batik products that are some of the most sought after in the Caribbean. Batik is created using an ancient Indonesian method that uses wax to resist dye on parts of the fabric and then designs (often consisting of lines and dots) are applied with that method by using a canting tool or stamp. Caribelle Batik is famous for its unique batik designs that combine flourishing strokes and elements of nature. While at Caribelle Batik you’ll be able to learn more about the methods used to create batik as there will be artisans demonstrating the technique and creating products onsite while explaining the process. You can purchase products you see while at Caribelle Batik and the majority of them will have been created right in house.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Tintamarre Island

The island of St Martin (on the southern end of which St Maarten sits) has had its fair share of land disputes, as you would expect from an island that is split into two territories, one French and one Dutch. The tiny island of Tintamarre just off the coast is no different and is now a part of the French St Martin. Located less than two miles to the northeast of St Maarten, this flat, 80-acre island is uninhabited and includes many unspoiled beaches to explore, some of which are clothing-optional. With calm waters, historical ruins to explore and fields of greenery, grass and palm trees to wander through, there is much to do on this tiny slice of Caribbean paradise.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

La Fortaleza (The Fortress)

The Wedgwood blue and white Santa Catalina Palace was built in 1533 and makes an impressive sight as you approach through a narrow Old San Juan street. While the building exudes an air of calm authority, it occupies a site that was long one of the most contested strategic positions in the Caribbean: La Fortaleza. And you can still see stone fortifications built by the Spanish, brooding above the waves.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Rose Island

Dreams of the Bahamas are usually comprised of an empty, white-sand beach, set on the shores of a deserted island that’s surrounded by a turquoise sea. Finding that beach can be tough, however, as much of the development located around Nassau leaves little sense of seclusion. Just off the shore of Nassau, however, the uninhabited sands of Rose Island are closer to that tropical dream. A lone beach bar and a few palm trees that skank to the rhythm of the breeze, and an exclusive setting for snorkeling and sunbathing in a private corner of paradise. On a full day getaway to Sandy Toes, leave the first set of footprints in the white sand that has been wiped clear by the tide. Order a drink at the beachfront bar and swim in the crystalline waters, or colonize an empty, oceanfront hammock and not do anything at all. It’s a getaway from your getaway where you can completely press pause and soak up the relaxation, or ramp up the energy on the tropical holiday.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

De Palm Island

De Palm Island is a small island off of the western coast of Aruba that attracts people from the main island looking for a new experience. In addition to hosting an array of outdoor activities including swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving and beach volleyball, De Palm Island also offers several options for those seeking rest and relaxation. All-inclusive packages make it easy to spend an entire day in the water, lounging on the beach and having your fill of unlimited food and drinks. If you can pull yourself away from the cabana, grab a snorkel and get a glimpse at the beautiful coral reefs teeming with tropical sea life, including the blue parrotfish, native only to this area. As far as family entertainment goes, this is a one-stop shop for water sports for the kids and cabanas with an open bar for the adults. You'll need to take a ferry or catamaran to the island, both of which leave regularly from Port De Palm.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

Fort Fincastle

Sitting atop Bennet's Hill, overlooking the city of Nassau, the hulking Fort Fincastle regally rests. The fort, though rather simple in appearance, is still impressive due to its huge brick walls with canons peeking out over the top. Built in 1793 by Lord Dunmore, the governor of the island at the time, this 38.5 m (126 ft) tall fort was constructed to offer protection over the island. Today, you can climb to the top of the fort to explore the cannons and three rooms that are dug beneath the lookout. While the fort makes for a neat viewing opportunity, it is truly a must-see because of the spectacular panoramic views of the ocean it offers from the top.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Honeymoon Beach

Honeymoon Beach is a peaceful cove characterized by a long, soft sandy beach that gently curves against the turquoise sea and is framed by palm trees and lush greenery. Though often visited by those vacationing on the Caribbean island of St Thomas, Honeymoon Beach is actually located on Water Island, a tiny isle that is a short distance offshore from St Thomas. Both islands are part of the US Virgin Islands. Honeymoon Beach provides a respite from the harried shoppers in Charlotte Amalie and is a good alternative to St Thomas' popular Magens Bay. Honeymoon Beach provides an ideal respite for travelers to forget their lingering work stress from back home and just relax. The beach has a large stretch of sand next to calm waters, making it an ideal place to swim. Restaurants, bars and bathrooms are also conveniently adjacent to the beach.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Paradise Island

Paradise Island in the Bahamas lives up to its name. Though Nassau, the colorful capital of the Bahamas, is high up on many traveler’s must-see list, visitors to the Bahamas shouldn't leave without taking a quick jaunt across the sea to explore Paradise Island. Paradise Island is over 685 acres of tropical fun in the Caribbean. Beaches, restaurants, bars, casinos, innovative hotels and land and water based entertainment cover the island and you'll quickly learn it's nearly impossible to get bored on Paradise Island. The most famous landmark on Paradise Island is Atlantis Resort. Even if you're not staying at Atlantis you can get day passes to visit its water park and aquarium which has pools, waterslides and sea animals to view – one waterslide even goes through the shark tank. Golfing and water activities like snorkeling are also popular activities during the day on Paradise Island. At night, the fun continues at the many beach bars that dot the island.

Learn More

 

Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

Top Attractions

Restaurant

Arawak Cay

This seafood paradise—ripe with fresh fish and strong drinks—is a destination for diners looking to truly taste Nassau. What began with a few tiny stalls selling locally sourced conch quickly grew to include a variety fish and a more extensive list of traditional Bahamian fare. Travelers line up for famous conch salad and crispy conch fritters that local cooks fry to order. But visitors can sample shrimp, lobster and snapper prepared street side, too. Be sure to request a hit of local hot sauce, made with the island’s special blend of spicy peppers and juicy limes. Arawak Cay is a fun stop for an afternoon snack or a delicious local dinner. And since the streets come alive at dusk, this waterfront spot is an ideal destination for a frosty beer or a strong sipping sundowner to round out the night.

Learn More

Winery

Brugal Rum Center

Named after Catalonian expatriate Andres Brugal, a visit to the Brugal Rum Center offers visitors a chance to see the magic of turning sugarcane into one of the Dominican Republic’s chief exports – rum. From golden brown to crystal clear, the rum you’ll see, smell, and taste at the Brugal rum center will open your eyes to the possibility of what a refined drink rum can be. Families enjoy the wondrous automated distilling and bottling process and marvel at the mechanics of turning sugarcane into the nectar of the gods. An excellent escape from the ordinary while in Puerto Plata, take some time to explore a local icon and learn a bit about distilling in the process.

Learn More

Winery

Bacardi Rum Factory (Casa Bacardi)

San Juan is the home of world famous Bacardí rum. Even if you’ve never given much thought to how this Caribbean staple gets from the cane fields to your mojito, the Casa Bacardí Visitor Center offers a surprisingly interesting experience. See the distillery, bottling plant and a museum which traces the company’s origins in Cuba to its current global domination. Naturally it would be cruel to lead you all the way through this grown-up version of Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory and not let you sample the wares, so pure rum and cocktails are handed out towards the end.

Learn More

 

Caribbean & Bermuda

25 Featured Attractions

Sights & Landmarks

Grace Bay Beach

On the island of Providenciales, Grace Bay Beach is the Turks’ sandy gem, voted best beach by beach-lovers the world over. The white sand here is stunning, offset by gently lapping turquoise waters. Taking advantage of those sunset and ocean views, it’s here that you’ll find the majority of Providenciales’ upmarket resorts. Restaurants, dive outfits and other facilities are also based at Grace Bay, but the vibe remains relaxed rather than busy, and empty stretches of beach can easily be found. Close offshore, the fringing coral reef sets divers’ hearts fluttering with iridescent tropical fish and flapping rays. It’s ideal for beginner snorkelers, with great visibility and little sea vegetation to spoil the pristine underwater view.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Asa Wright Nature Centre

In the field of eco-tourism, the Asa Wright Nature Centre was well ahead of the curve, having been a sanctuary for wildlife since 1967. It is famous the world over for the staggering variety of birds which pass through, often on their way to or from nearby continental South America. From Ornate Hawk-eagles to the nocturnal Oilbird and the psychedelic plumage of dozens of tropical species, there is enough here to make a birdwatcher of any skeptic. The center was once a coffee and cocoa plantation, and you can still enjoy lunch or high tea on the broad shady veranda of its old colonial house. Get the most out of your visit by taking a tour; expert guides will be able to point out not just birds but also the huge range of butterflies as well as lizards and other fauna.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

National Heroes Park

Kingston’s largest green space is National Heroes Park, a 50-acre former horse track that now features monuments to important figures from Jamaican history. Among them are monuments and tombs to people like Marcus Garvey, Normal Manley and Sir Alexander Bustamante, among many others. There’s also a war memorial to Jamaicans who died in WWI, which was relocated here from an earlier locations, and it’s the site of memorial gatherings on Remembrance Day.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Emancipation Park

Take a break from the hustle of Kingston with a visit to Emancipation Park, a seven-acre swath of green space in the New Kingston area of the Jamaican capital. It’s a popular spot for local to have lunch or walk the track around the park’s perimeter. Within the park you’ll find fountains and gardens of native and imported plants. Art pieces also dot the scenery, including the “Redemption Song” statue at the park entrance, honoring native son Bob Marley, and there are also African Adinkra symbols incorporated in the scenery, like the Futumfrafo, a two-headed crocodile, on the sides of the benches, and the Wafa Aba, seed of the Wafa Tree, decorating the top of the perimeter fence.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains create the longest mountain range on the island of Jamaica and constitute one of the longest continuous mountain ranges in the Caribbean. Blue Mountain Peak is the highest peak on the island and rises an impressive 7,402 feet (2,256 meters) above sea level. Stretching for 28 miles (45 kilometers), the mountain range spans the rugged and scenic eastern region of Jamaica and offers views of the island’s north and south coasts. On a clear day, you can see across the Caribbean all the way to Cuba. The Blue Mountains are one of the most spectacular natural attractions on the island of Jamaica and are a major draw for nature lovers. The region is home to a wide variety of flora and fauna including Jamaica’s national tree, the Blue Mahoe; and the giant swallowtail, the second-largest butterfly in the world. The temperature in the mountains is noticeably cooler than down at sea level and the layer of mist that shrouds the peaks gives the mountains their bluish tint.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Caroni Bird Sanctuary

Every day, the scarlet ibis, Trinidad & Tobago’s national bird, flies to nearby Venezuela to feed and heads back to its island home in the late afternoon. Watching the birds in their thousands return to roost in the vivid green mangroves of Caroni Swamp, red plumage blazing against the deepening blue sky, is one of the greatest sights the Caribbean has to offer. Take a sunset trip by boat through the serene “canals” and tidal lagoons of the swamp, with guides pointing out snakes, iguanas and other creatures as you glide past. Once anchored, sit back and enjoy the hush of dusk until the return of the ibises.

Learn More

Fun & Games

Caribelle Batik at Romney Manor

Caribelle Batik is essentially a shop on St Kitts, but a very special one. Located within Romney Manor, a stately estate once owned by the great-great-great grandfather of Thomas Jefferson, Caribelle Batik sells popular batik products that are some of the most sought after in the Caribbean. Batik is created using an ancient Indonesian method that uses wax to resist dye on parts of the fabric and then designs (often consisting of lines and dots) are applied with that method by using a canting tool or stamp. Caribelle Batik is famous for its unique batik designs that combine flourishing strokes and elements of nature. While at Caribelle Batik you’ll be able to learn more about the methods used to create batik as there will be artisans demonstrating the technique and creating products onsite while explaining the process. You can purchase products you see while at Caribelle Batik and the majority of them will have been created right in house.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Nassau Cruise Port

Just 180 miles (290 km) off the southern Florida coast, on the island of New Providence, Nassau is the capital of the Bahamas and its 29 islands. When you dock at Prince George Wharf on the island’s north coast, it’s less than a 10 minute stroll to downtown’s boutiques, restaurants and, most importantly, your launch pad for an exhilarating snorkelling or diving shore excursion. Getting into town is easy: either walk a little way south to the main shopping hub, Bay Street, or grab one of the many taxis waiting at the wharf. Downtown Nassau is a colourful mix of colonial architecture and historic landmarks, boutique shopping and tropical gardens. Take a ride in a horse-drawn carriage or ride a water taxi over to relax on Paradise Island’s golden beaches. A guided tour will show you the colonial highlights plus introduce you to flamingos and wildlife at the lovely Ardastra Gardens.

Learn More

Water Activities & Tours

Encuentro Beach (Playa Encuentro)

Dominican Republic is home to incredible stretches of white sandy beach, expansive all-inclusive resorts and stunning turquoise waters. But it’s also home to some of the Caribbean’s best surfing. Perhaps no spot in DR is better known for its serious waves than Encuentro Beach. Several local surf schools line the beach, where strong winds mean morning is the most ideal time of day to learn. Protected waters and a vibrant local surf scene  make it a top destination for travelers who want to hang ten while staying in Puerto Plata. Five unique breaks known as Coco Pipe, Bobo’s Point, La Izquierda, the Destroyer and Le Derecha offer travelers distinctly different rides, with some of the biggest waves coming from Coco Pipe and the Destroyer. Travelers can opt to explore on their own, or sign up for learn-to surf lessons with one of the local schools, or as part of an organized tour.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Port Antonio

If the rough-and-tumble bustle of Kingston or the all-inclusive enclaves of Montego Bay aren’t your style, consider Port Antonio. This sleepy banana-port town in the lush northwest of the island is a side of Jamaica you may have never heard of, unless you were around in the 1940s when Port Antonio was an idyllic and popular escape for Hollywood elite like Errol Flynn who built an estate here. Port Antonio’s dense downtown area is pockmarked with dilapidated Georgian-era buildings, and just outside of town, you can see the stretch of shore that served as the set for Brooke Shields’ film The Blue Lagoon. Nature is the name of the game here, from the rolling blue surf at Boston Bay—purported to be the birthplace of jerk chicken—to the placid jungle-fringed waters of the Rio Grande, where you can hire a guide to take you on a run down the river aboard a slender, 20-foot-long bamboo raft.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Caroni Swamp

Caroni Swamp is a 12,000-acre swamp situated just south of Port of Spain on Trinidad & Tobago’s west coast. Being the second largest mangrove wetlands on the island and the natural nesting home for one of the country’s national birds, Caroni Swamp is protected under the Ramsar Convention as a wetland of international importance. The swamp runs along the banks of the Caroni River and features a maze of channels and lagoons. The central section is designated as a wildlife sanctuary, with the mangrove trees providing the ideal nesting place for the distinctive Scarlet Ibis birds, along with around 100 species of migratory birds, making it perfect for birdwatchers. The main attraction for nature lovers occurs just before sunset, when the ritualistic roosting habits of thousands of the brightly-colored Ibis can be observed close-up. The birds fly in unison to feed and nest here, creating a dazzling cloud of red against the evening sky.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

English Harbour

Journey down to the far south of Antigua to see one of the island's oldest and most beautiful historic districts, English Harbour. This tiny (population of 759), but scenic settlement is a great place to wander around in and enjoy the old-fashioned buildings while learning about the nation's colonial roots. English Harbour is best known for the many historic sites it is home to including Nelson's Dockyard, a restored British colonial naval station. It also is internationally recognized as a center of sailing and yachting. While visiting, enjoy a walk amongst the antiquated district's tall brick buildings from the colonial era, or stroll along the harbor and scope out the huge yachts and sailboats that are stationed there. No matter what you do, an afternoon spent in English Harbour is certain to be full of fun and interesting sites.

Learn More

Cultural/Heritage Places

San Juan National Historic Site (Sitio Histórico Nacional de San Juan)

Established in 1949, The San Juan National Historic Site is home to some of the city’s most famous attractions. Visitors can climb to Castillo San Felibe del Morro, overlooking the San Juan Bay, for an up close look at military efforts more than 250 years ago. Travelers can learn about historic battles that took place against the English and Dutch while visiting the restored lighthouse, chapel and vintage cannons.History buffs will also love Castillo San Cristobal, near the gate of Old San Juan. While El Morro protected Puerto Rico from seaside attacks, Castillo San Cristobal was designed to stop intruders approaching by land. With grounds stretching some 27 acres, this is Puerto Rico’s largest fortification site, as well as the biggest built by the Spanish after discovering the New World.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Caguas

Caguas is one of Puerto Rico’s most diverse and important historical areas – a town rich in Creole heritage and home to an abundance of natural beauty and superlative shopping. Once the home of the indigenous Taino group, Caguas has also known Spanish, British and Dutch residents, the remnants of which can be best experienced by simply walking the town, exploring the beautiful boardwalk or following the Route of the Creole Heart at the Traditional Urban Center.Those who appreciate the beauty of Puerto Rico’s outdoors will also be impressed by the Caguas Botanical Gardens, which feature some of the most amazing waterfalls and natural greens in the Caribbean. The San Juan town also serves as the starting point for many day-trip adventures and excursions to Puerto Rico’s interior.

Learn More

Buildings & Structure

The Capitol of Puerto Rico (El Capitolio)

This classic capitol in the heart of San Juan is home to the Legislative Assembly, House or Representatives, the Senate and a whole lot of Puerto Rican history. Visitors to this regal site, which officially opened in 1907, will find massive marble columns, ornate stonework and a brightly colored capitol dome, in addition to the Architecture and Construction Archives of the University of Puerto Rico. These include rare ink and cloth sketches, as well as the original 38 blue print plans for the structure. Visitors say this classic building is a major departure from the rest of the old city, but a few hours wandering the halls, learning about Puerto Rican history and politics is a worthy addition to any San Juan visit.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Concord Falls

This waterfall site has not one but three separate streams to visit—from a 35-foot cascade right as you enter the falls area to two larger waterfalls that require a hike through the forest reserve. The first waterfall is accessible via a paved path with handrails and is worth making the visit to for the sight alone. The natural pools here make for a refreshing swim. The forests are popular for hiking among large boulders, creeks and trees. The winding path leads through a nutmeg plantation, first visiting the second waterfall named “Au Coin” before finally reaching the farthest waterfall (“Fontainebleu”), which towers 65 feet over the ground below. It takes approximately an hour to reach the final waterfall, and while it is possible to swim in the clear, small pools underneath the falls, visitors are advised to watch the currents.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Natural Pool

The Natural Pool is a tucked away basin formed by rock and volcanic stone circles that fills with ocean water. The pool is also known locally as "Conchi" or "Cura di Tortuga," because it is said that the pool was once used to hold sea turtles before they were sold (tortuga means turtle in Papiamento, the official language of the Caribbean). Visitors can swim and snorkel here, although the area is really not that big. On calm days, the pool is great for a dip, but keep in mind that swimming here is risky when waves leap the rock barrier.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Crashboat Beach

Once the site of a military port that rescued downed aircrews, Cashboat Beach has since become a favorite ocean-side destination for travelers to northwest Puerto Rico. Clear turquoise waters and calm surf make it an ideal spot for families with small children, but visitors say the picturesque shores of Crashboat are perfect for just about any traveler. It’s easy to spend a day relaxing on the sands of this quiet beach, with rocky cliffs perfect for jumping into refreshing waters. But visitors agree it’s worth staying until sunset, when the bright red sun tucks behind the deep blue ocean and local vendors come out to prepare traditional food over open fires. Crashboat attracts plenty of out-of-towners on holiday, but it’s the perfect beach for visitors looking to interact with locals and get a taste of contemporary Puerto Rican life, too.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Tintamarre Island

The island of St Martin (on the southern end of which St Maarten sits) has had its fair share of land disputes, as you would expect from an island that is split into two territories, one French and one Dutch. The tiny island of Tintamarre just off the coast is no different and is now a part of the French St Martin. Located less than two miles to the northeast of St Maarten, this flat, 80-acre island is uninhabited and includes many unspoiled beaches to explore, some of which are clothing-optional. With calm waters, historical ruins to explore and fields of greenery, grass and palm trees to wander through, there is much to do on this tiny slice of Caribbean paradise.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Negril Cliffs

Even by themselves, the black hued cliffs outside of Negril are natural sites to behold. Rising 40 feet above turquoise waters and pockmarked by sea caves and coves, the cliffs form a defining natural icon for Jamaica’s far western coast. It isn’t just their beauty, however, that draws visitors here in droves. Rather, it’s the deep waters immediately offshore and the presence of cliffside beach bars—which all combine to form perfect conditions for throwing yourself off the edge. The cliff diving here on Negril’s cliffs is some of the world’s most famous, where locals and visitors regularly drop over 40 feet down to the sea. Professionals will often put on shows and perform daring flips and flops, and occasionally visitors will join in the show in a fit of Caribbean bravado. The cliffs are a popular spot for snorkeling tours to stop en route from the dive site, and are a short distance from the laidback guesthouses towards the southern end of Negril.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Ponce

Ponce is Puerto Rico’s second city and a complete change of pace from the capital San Juan. Ponce's low key charm speaks louder to architecture buffs than it does to party animals. Starting at the central Plaza Las Delicicas you’ll find two defining landmarks of the city, the twin-towered cathedral and the vivid scarlet and black stripes of the whimsical Parque de Bombas, once a fire station, now a museum of fire-fighting.In the streets near the square you’ll soon come across the lemon-yellow Teatro La Perla and the delightful candy pink Museum of Architecture. Head north for the Castillo Serrallés, a Spanish Colonial Revival mansion which houses a museum relating to the island’s all-important sugar and rum industries. It’s just one of the imposing residences you’ll see throughout the city. After all that visual richness cleanse your palate with the tropical Modernism of the highly-recommended Ponce Museum of Art.

Learn More

Geological Formations

Rio Camuy Cave Park (Parque Nacional de las Cavernas del Río Camuy)

You don’t have to be a seasoned spelunker to enjoy Río Camuy Cave Park, one of the largest such sites in the world. The caves, sculpted by the underground river from which it derives its name, were only discovered in 1958 and haven’t yet been fully surveyed.The most accessible part is Cueva Clara. Descending into this subterranean chamber, pierced by shafts of sunlight, lined with luxuriant ferns and echoing with bat screeches, is an unforgettable experience.Back on ground level you can peer into the enormous Tres Pueblos Sinkhole or set off on a walking trail to explore more of this thickly-forested area.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Stingray City Antigua

Stingray City in Antigua is a special place as it is home to a plethora of stingrays in their natural habitat. Plus, the area of sea where Stingray City is situated is quite shallow and is only a few feet deep in many parts, making it an ideal excursion for families with children in addition to traveling adults or those who can’t swim well. Though Stingray City in Antigua is a cordoned-off area, the stingrays are still in their natural habitat. The gentle creatures are accustomed to humans so they are quite friendly, and visitors can watch them float through the water. Learn how to interact with the stingrays before hopping into the water with snorkel gear to watch them glide around with the chance to touch and play with them.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Rio Bueno

Rio Bueno is a small village located 32 miles (51.5 kilometers) east of Montego Bay on the island of Jamaica. The Rio Bueno Harbour is the deepest harbor in Jamaica and the site where Columbus is believed to have first touched land in Jamaica. Visitors to Jamaica flock to this small fishing community to experience one of the most exhilarating excursions on the island: adventures along the Rio Bueno River. The river is situated in a beautiful tropical setting and movie buffs may recognize it as the location of the classic 1964 film, A High Wind in Jamaica, starring Anthony Quinn and James Coburn. Visitors to the village of Rio Bueno can tour the ruins of a fort that dates to the 18th century and several historic buildings and churches that overlook the Caribbean Sea. The main attraction in Rio Bueno, however, is the Rio Bueno River, a favorite destination for kayaking, rafting, tubing and river boarding.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Monte Cristi National Park

Monte Cristi National Park, or Parque National Monte Cristi, is a national park in the Dominican Republic. It is one of the driest areas in the Dominican Republic, receiving about two inches of rain per year.The area extends from the Haiti border to the tip of Punta Rucia. Monte Cristi includes subtropical dry forests, lagoons, mangrove swamps, beaches and a stunning 777-foot (237-meter) limestone mesa called El Morro that juts up from the water. A trip to Monte Cristi National Park includes a boat ride through the mangroves on which you can look for some of the 160 species of birds that call the area home. Several offshore islands called The Seven Brothers Cays, or Los Cayos Siete Hermanos, are visible from Monte Cristi National Park. In addition to visiting Monte Cristi National Park, the nearby island of Cayo Paraiso is worth a stop.

Learn More