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Travel Today in Australia

Explore Australia

Enjoy opportunities of being in the right place at the right time

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Featured Destinations

Make memories you will enjoy

Visit a new city and understand why most of the people have an unforgettable experience.

 

Have a rest and relax

Get out of a daily routine

Seek for peace and simple resting while introducing yourself to new horizons.

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Tickets & Passes

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Top Attractions

Cultural/Heritage Places

Waradah Australian Centre

If you want to know more about Australia’s indigenous owners and wish to see or purchase genuine Aboriginal arts and craft, consider a visit to the Waradah Aboriginal Centre (sometimes referred to as Koomurri Aboriginal Centre) in Katoomba in the Blue Mountains.One of Australia’s best Aboriginal cultural centers, Waradah is the place to learn more about Australia’s unique heritage and first peoples, as well as witness traditional Aboriginal dance and didgeridoo performances. Various shows featuring Aboriginal dancers or musicians in traditional costume are scheduled throughout the day and include an introduction to the story and an explanation of the significance of each performance.The recently refurbished fine art gallery contains genuine Australian Aboriginal paintings, while the center’s shop has a large collection of more affordable and varied Aboriginal art and crafts, such as totem statues, ceramics, glasswork and didgeridoos.

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Water & Amusement Parks

Luna Park Melbourne

Enter through the iconic mouth of Mr Moon to experience the innocent joys of Melbourne’s Luna Park in St Kilda.This ultimate city fair has brightened St Kilda’s Lower Esplanade for more than a century, featuring a classic Ferris Wheel, the Jewel in the Crown Carousel, the Silly Serpent Rollercoaster and a haunted Ghost Train, as well as many other family-fun and thrilling rides. The most famous Luna Park ride is the Scenic Railway Roller Coaster, which has delighted passengers with paramount views of Port Phillip Bay since the Park opened in 1912.

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Water & Amusement Parks

Luna Park Sydney

This iconic park has been entertaining locals and travelers with a lively midway, carnival games, giant Ferris wheels and contemporary Big Top concerts since 1935. With more than 20 rides, including the dizzying Spider, hilarious Tumble Bug and the classic carousel, visitors to this Sydney standard are sure to have a fun-filled day at the harbour. Travelers agree the best time to visit is during hot summer nights, when city views from atop the Ferris wheel are most impressive and the glow of neon lights lends the park a true sense of nostalgia.

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Gardens & Parks

Alice Springs Desert Park

The Alice Springs Desert Park offers the opportunity to experience the main desert environments in Australia. Wander through sand, woodland and river deserts and learn about their different plant and animal inhabitants. You will also learn about the traditional owners of the land, the Arrernte.Animals rarely seen in the wild are on display in the nocturnal house which mimics the night desert offering a peek at rare and endangered animals that only come out in the dark like bilbies and carnivorous ghost bats.The aquarium offers you a look at the animals you might find in a waterhole including fish, yabbies, burrowing frogs and turtles.

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Wildlife & Zoos

Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Australia's first and largest koala sanctuary, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is home to over a hundred cute and cuddly koalas, along with other weird and wonderful native Australian animals like wombats, emus, dingos and kangaroos.Opened in 1927, the sanctuary began as a home to only two koalas, and over the years has grown to its current size. Lone Pine found its fame around the time of WWII, when Americans would visit the park to see these strange and new creatures. Today, the sanctuary is dedicated to the conservation of all native Australian animals, especially the koala, and works under strict regulations of the Queensland National Park and Nature Reserve Office.The real highlight of the park is that you are able to cuddle a koala! Get the chance to hold a koala and even pose for a photo. No personal cameras are allowed, so to take home the special memory of you and a koala, you will have the chance to purchase a professional photograph from the park.

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Scenic Landmarks

River Torrens Linear Park Trail

This pleasant trail can be reached from city center, but its waterfront views, open fields and quiet surroundings lend a country feel that’s hard to find in most urban settings. Linear Park offers visitors an ideal setting for afternoon sunbathing, relaxing picnics, or even a dip in the River Torrens. The trail, which wraps past the Adelaide Festival Center, Convention Center and the local zoo, is perfect for a leisurely stroll or a recreational bike ride.

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Wildlife & Zoos

Caversham Wildlife Park

Get up close and personal with kangaroos and koalas! Perth’s Caversham Wildlife Park holds the largest private collection of native wildlife in Western Australia, and attracts visitors from all walks of life. Enjoy the emus, discover dingos, walk around wallabies, peer into the life of a python, plus countless other wildlife activities. This family-owned and operated wildlife park has a humble, community feel yet offers an up-close look at more than 200 animal species for visitors to explore.

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Water Activities & Tours

Mooloolaba

Considered to be one of the young and trendy towns on the Sunshine Coast, Mooloolaba has something to offer everyone. Enjoy swimming, surfing, scuba diving, snorkeling, and even diving with sharks in this lovely beach town. Mooloolaba is also a great places for nature lovers. Visit Kondalilla National Park to take in swimming holes, waterfalls, and great walking trails just outside of the city. Underwater World is one of the top aquariums in Australia, and with the ocean as your background, see sharks, crocodiles, hundreds of fish, turtles, and seals. If you're feeling adventurous, Mooloolaba is also home to Sunshine Coast Skydivers. Get one of the most breathtaking views of the coast from up in the air. For a more relaxed view of the coast, hire a boat out of the Mooloolaba Wharf.

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See different sceneries

See different sceneries worldwide

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

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Nature and Wildlife Tours

Bus Tours

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Full-day Tours

Half-day Tours

Top Attractions

Cultural/Heritage Places

Valley of the Giants

The Valley of the Giants sits in the Walpole-Nornalup National Park and is home to hundreds of ancient Red Tingle Trees. The main attraction is the Treetop Walk that sets visitors 130 feet (40 meters) up among the forest canopy on a lightweight bridge for a bird's-eye view. The Ancient Empire Walk is a series of boardwalks at ground level that weave around–and occasionally through–the massive tree trunks. Red Tingle Trees are among the world’s tallest trees, some of which are over 400 years old, with trunk circumferences up to 50 feet (15 meters) around.Both the Treetop Walk and the Ancient Empire Walk are around 650 yards (600 meters) in length and both are suitable for walkers of all skills. The Ancient Empire Walk does contain some sections of earthen paths that may become muddy after rain, but the walks are otherwise suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. The Valley of the Giants also has barbecue areas for picnicking and public toilets available.

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Gardens & Parks

Point Nepean National Park

One of Victoria’s most significant landscapes, Point Nepean National Park spans more than 1,000 acres (560 hectares) on the pristine Mornington Peninsula. Visitors can immerse themselves in the coastal views and native grasslands while exploring the rich history of the park. What began as indigenous land became one of the earliest European settlements in Victoria during 1845, then a quarantine station before the site turned into a military center. In addition to its rich culture, the park is host to a world of marine life, including emerald-colored sea shrubs and invertebrates.Discover Victorian landmarks, such as the park’s highest point, Cheviot Hill, overlooking the jetty where Prime Minister Harold Holt disappeared in 1967. History buffs can visit Fort Nepean for panoramic views and explore military fortifications used in both World Wars. Numerous hiking trails and beach walks of varied length start in the park.

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Gardens & Parks

Kakadu National Park

Kakadu National Park has a feeling and a beauty unlike anywhere else on earth. With its sandstone escarpments looming up from the plain, its secret waterholes and lily-strewn waterways, its teeming birdlife and ancient rock art, it's a place that will get a hold on something old in your soul.It's Australia's largest national park, clocking in at a mindboggling 1.7 million hectares (4.2 million acres). In that vast space shelters a staggering multiplicity of fauna, including dingos, wallabies and saltwater crocodiles. There's plants and animals here that are found nowhere else in the world, and a number of endangered species.Make sure to take a cruise along one of the numerous park rivers - cruising along the Alligator River will allow to discover amazing birds and see crocs up close safely. Yellow Water near Cooina is a good starting point for sunrise cruises, usually the best time of the day for wildlife viewing.

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Geological Formations

Bungle Bungle Range

Purnululu National Park, or the Bungle Bungles, is one the world’s most beautiful areas to be discovered as recently as it has. Not thirty years since its discovery, this majestic 239,723 hectare range located in Kimberley, Australia, features utterly unique and beautiful layered sandstone domes closely resembling beehives.Once inhabited by aborigines, in this amazing park you will discover gorges, wallabies, and fan palm trees. In the plains surrounding the sandstone domes you can catch exotic plant-life, such as beautiful bright yellow acacia flowers and grevilleas.The only way to discover the Bungle Bungles is on foot, but with temperatures averaging more than 30 Celsius (86 F), so make sure you come prepared. Luckily, on your journey you will discover fresh-water rock pools, so refilling bottles and going for a dip is only part of the fun.

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Gardens & Parks

Eurimbula National Park

Mangrove-dotted wetlands and eucalypt forests outline the pristine beaches of Eurimbula National Park in Agnes Water, where visitors can explore unspoiled Australia as they uncover this coastal wonderland. The melange of plant varieties and untouched botanicals attract hoards of wildlife, and with that, the park protects miles of coastal vegetation.For a peaceful getaway, lounge by the beach or drop a lure in for some fishing and boating. Nature lovers may like to camp out and spend more time viewing the park’s various wildflowers and wildlife, including honeyeaters, powerful owls and turtles, while others may opt to scout out the terrain by following one of the trails, or get adventurous with a bushwalk. Many travelers choose to have picnics at the waterfront for a relaxing experience.

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Gardens & Parks

Kangaroo Point Cliffs Park

Located right across the river from Brisbane’s CBD, the popular Kangaroo Points Cliff Park is the place to head for a sweeping view of Brisbane’s downtown skyline. The cliffs here were formed by mining in the middle of the 19th century, and are now a popular spot for rock climbing and abseiling down their face. Since the park is located right on the river, kayaking is another popular activity for visitors as well as locals, and the BBQ grills and walking tracks make it a perfect family outing. To try your hand at scaling the cliffs, a number of climbing and abseiling companies offer guided lessons on the rocks, and the park is also a popular spot for stops on a city tour. And, while it doesn’t take long to swing by the park and enjoy the manicured grounds, it’s a peaceful, fun, and healthy retreat in the middle of Brisbane’s downtown.

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Sights & Landmarks

Mt. Coot-tha

Brisbane’s all-natural lookout point and city escape is Mt Coot-tha, hovering above the city to its west. The views from the lookout are legendary, taking in Brisbane and the undulating Brisbane River, all the way to Moreton Bay and the Glass House Mountains on the horizon. At the foot of the mountain, the lush Brisbane Botanic Gardens provide a vivid touch of green.The lookout is surrounded by expansive native bush and parkland. Brisbanites flock here on family picnics, or to follow walking tracks to waterfalls and more lookouts. An Aboriginal Art Trail winds past ancient sites, and weekend cyclists come here to follow the winding roads. Come here at night to see the city lights twinkle, for a relaxed lunch at the cafe or more formal dinner at the Summit Restaurant.

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Gardens & Parks

Lamington National Park

One of Queensland, Australia’s absolute gems, Lamington National Park exemplifies what it means to explore Australia’s markedly majestic natural life. Full of waterfalls, hiking tracks, rainforests and expansive plant- animal-life, it is no wonder that Lamington is considered one of this continent’s premiere destinations.Covering over 20,500 hectares, Lamington has a diverse flora life, housing majestic plants that are not found anywhere else in the world and has tree-roots that have been in existence for more than 5,000 years. You can also find a similarly significant and overwhelming bird-life--it's full of king parrots, cockatoos, pale-headed rosella’s, sooty owls, red-browed treecreepers, just to list a few. Also be on the lookout for exotic reptiles, frogs and mammals.

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Gardens & Parks

Mount Field National Park

Tasmania is known for its stunning scenery and wealth of natural beauty, and of the island’s 19 national parks, Mount Field National Park is the oldest of them all. Established in 1916, this area set an hour from Hobart offers tumbling waterfalls, backcountry hiking trails and diverse wildlife that includes the awkward-looking platypus and the famous Tasmanian devil. Of all the sights within the park, Russell Falls is one of the most popular thanks to its ease of access. A 20-minute, paved walk leads to the thundering three-tiered waterfall, and adjoining hiking tracks lead through gum forests and brilliantly green patches of ferns.During the months of April and June, the upper slopes of the Mount Field National Park are ablaze in the colors of fall. Deep reds and bright oranges blanket the thinning treetops, and there is enough snowfall from July until September to sustain a popular ski lodge.

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Gardens & Parks

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

Located in northern Sydney, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is the second-oldest national park in the country and a favorite among campers, hikers and nature lovers. Its lush rainforest landscape, quiet creeks and mountain passes lead visitors to forget Ku-ring-gai Chase is still within Sydney city limits, but its incredible views, thick mangroves and scenic drives make it the perfect escape from center city hustle.The park is on the Australian National Heritage List, and travelers often wander its well-kept walking paths that wind through the Australian jungle. Driving may prove the easiest way to navigate the area, but many visitors prefer to call upon bicycles and horses to explore. An ideal day trip, Ku-ring-gai Chase offers public picnic spaces, paddle and sailboats and scenic overlooks like the Barrenjoey Lighthouse.

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Gardens & Parks

Atherton Tablelands

The sweltering heat of Cairns in northern Queensland is a sweating contradiction to the lush, fertile landscape of the Atherton Tablelands. An easy hour and a half drive inland, the towns of Mareeba and Atherton are an oasis from the heat and bustle of one of Australia’s larger tropical cities.The Atherton Tablelands cover an area of 32,000 square kilometres and their altitude ranges from 500 to 1280 metres above sea level. The distinctive climatic conditions lend themselves to a diverse and arrestingly photogenic range of natural phenomena. No less than 12 species of birdlife are unique to the tablelands, which encompasses pockets of the forest that once covered it, now protected as National Park. With a high yearly rainfall, waterfalls in the area are abundant and active. Local attractions include platypus watching, boat cruises and hot air ballooning, and the region is famous for its produce markets and wineries.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Blue Mountains

Almost on the edge of Sydney, and visible on a clear day from the city's observation towers, the beautiful World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains are the perfect destination for an idyllic day trip from the hustle-bustle of downtown Sydney. The Blue Mountains offer the stunning scenery of rugged sandstone outcrops, cavernous valleys and towering eucalyptus forests.Take advantage of Scenic World's cable cars and tramways to see the best of the Blue Mountains, including the Three Sisters rock formation. Glide between cliff tops and over the rainforest on the Scenic Skyway tram; descend into the Jamison Valley on the Scenic Railway; explore the rainforest along the Scenic Walkway and climb back to the top with unbeatable views on the Scenic Cableway.The area offers scenic drives, manicured gardens, shopping and pampering at spas and luxurious accommodations. Other attractions include the Zig Zag Railway, Norman Lindsay Gallery at Springwood and the Jenolan Caves.

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Gardens & Parks

Cleland Wildlife Park

The Cleland Wildlife Park is best known for its koala experience, which gives visitors the unique opportunity to snuggle up with one of the country’s cutest faces. Standard entry includes petting and a photo, but an additional fee lets travelers hold these little guys, too. Travelers can check out daily feedings of lorikeets, Tasmanian devils, dingoes and other animals native to Australia. Newly scheduled public night walks happen the last Friday of every month and give visitors the chance to see potoroos, bandicoots, bettongs and wild possums forage for food.

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Scenic Landmarks

Scenic World

World Heritage sites are typically known for their quiet beauty and historical significance, but Scenic World, stationed in the heart of Katoomba, amps it up with a major adrenaline rush. It includes the Scenic Railway, Scenic Skyway, Scenic Walkway and Scenic Cableway and visitors can “walk on air’ in a glass-floored skyway suspended 270 meters above ground, or hitch a ride in the steepest incline railroad on earth.Those afraid of heights can wander through Jurassic Rainforest or stroll through the Waterfall Walk and informative Coal Mining exhibit. More adventurous friends can catch the incredible views of Jamison Valley and Three Sisters from inside the country’s steepest cable car.

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Sights & Landmarks

Mrs Macquarie's Chair

This unique landmark—a massive rock fashioned into a cozy bench—was carved from sandstone in the early 1800s by Gov. Lachlan Macquarie for his wife Elizabeth. As the story goes, when the weather was warm and the sun high, Mrs. Macquarie loved to relax at the point of this scenic peninsula and stare out over the ocean.Today, travelers enjoy a leisurely walk to Mrs. Macquarie’s Chair from the iconic Opera House or wander over to this historic attraction after a visit to the nearby Royal Botanic Garden. In a bustling city that’s alive with energy, the stone bench offers visitors a perfect place to unwind, relax and take in the some of the best views of Sydney Harbour.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Lake Barrine

17,000 years ago, a large volcano erupted in Australia’s north-east corner, near what we now know as the city of Cairns. The core was blasted from this volcano leaving a huge crater, which filled with rainwater over time to create Lake Barrine.From less-than-peaceful beginnings, Lake Barrine has become the perfect place for a relaxing getaway. A massive body of fresh water tucked within opulent cool rainforest, Lake Barrine is a family friendly, low-key holiday destination with opportunities for hikers, photographers, and wildlife enthusiasts. Visitors looking for relaxation can indulge in tea, scones, jam and cream at the lakeside teahouse, built in 1926, and wander the lush, manicured garden surroundings. Guided boat tours to view the Lake’s distinctive ecosystem are available, while the picnic grounds provide the perfect spot for a family lunch. The clear waters of Lake Barrine make an enjoyable swimming spot for swimmers of all levels of fitness and experience.

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Gardens & Parks

Wilsons Promontory National Park

Part of the draw of any visit to Australia is to see some of its much-heralded rustic beauty. Ayers Rock has its fan-base, as does Byron Bay, but to many a Aussie, there’s nothing more beautiful than watching the sun set over the pristine beaches of Wilson’s Promontory.Lovingly referred to as “The Prom” by locals, this coastal outcropping is the furthest south one can go on Mainland Australia and features 50,000 hectares of untouched granite peaks backed by white sand beaches . Miles of walking tracks meander all through the pristine coastline, and hikers get to see the Australian wilderness as nature intended it. Teams of kangaroos, koalas, emus and wallabies scurry about the brush and grasslands, while penguins come to roost along the beaches at nightfall. Though Wilsons Promontory is a widely beloved spot, it is famous for its short-yet-seemingly long distance from civilization.

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Sights & Landmarks

Best Of All Lookout

True to its name, Best Of All Lookout has the best view in Springbrook National Park. Here, in this subtropical rainforest an hour from the Gold Coast, visitors will find an Antarctic Beech forest left over from the days of Gondwanaland, which in collection with the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia, is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage area for its unique geology and ecology. At Best Of All Lookout, visitors will peer out towards the peak of Mt Warning, which is famously known as Australia’s first place to greet the rising sun. From the viewing platform at Best Of All Lookout, the sandy coastline of Coolangatta can often be seen on clear days, as can the valleys of New South Wales that stretch all the way out towards the coast. Even though the hike to the lookout is short, keep an eye out for local wildlife like wallabies and curious padmelons, and since leeches and ticks are common in the area, be sure to wear long sleeves, pants, and boots to ward off the bush.

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Sights & Landmarks

Echo Point Lookout

Anyone who’s seen a picture of the Blue Mountains should recognize Echo Point. Famous for its view of the Three Sisters, this sweeping viewpoint on the outskirts of Katoomba defines the Blue Mountains’ beauty. From this cliff top ledge, the jagged escarpment vertically drops towards the distant valley floor—a void where clouds can linger in the treetops nearly a thousand feet below.Take a deep breath and drink in the beauty of the Blue Mountains’ southern flank, and then consider walking the “Giant Stairway” that drops down into the valley. Over 800 stairs that are carved from the mountain descend 1,000 vertical feet, where numerous hiking trails weave their way along the forested valley floor. Climbing the walls of the “Ruined Castle” is a popular valley hike, and is a good way to escape the crowds that tend to gather at the viewpoint. Rather than hiking back up the stairs, take a ride on the “Scenic Railway” that leads back to the top of the cliff.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Edith Falls (Leliyn)

Located in Nitmiluk National Park in the Top End of the Northern Territory, Edith Falls offer gorgeous views over the river, tiers of rock pools and waterfalls that cascade through the gully. All that, along with the area's wildlife, makes Edith Falls one of Australia's most picturesque -- not to mention underrated -- natural attractions. The falls are full of water year-round, but the clear, dry season between May and September is the best time to visit. Even so, the area surrounding the falls is especially lush and green during the intense rains earlier in the year, so visitors are in for a treat no matter when they go. A visit to the falls typically involves swimming, and Sweetwater Pool, as well as both the upper and lower pools, are all particularly suited for the activity. Visitors to the falls during the wet season, however, may find that swimming is off-limits due to potentially dangerous conditions.

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Geological Formations

The Pinnacles

The rainbow layers of sand that make up The Pinnacles are a spectacular site on the east coast of Fraser Island. They are one of the reasons why Fraser Island has UNESCO World Heritage listing.Over the last 2 million years sand has been blowing onto the island and formed fascinating geological sites such as the “perched” lakes, the remarkable dunes and these colorful cliffs. The cliffs change in color throughout the day and are particularly startling early morning and sunset when the reds become beautifully vibrant. The Pinnacles get their color from the iron compounds in the silica sands that are blown across the island.The traditional owners of the land tell a story about a wife running away with the rainbow man and her hunter husband deciding to kill her with a boomerang.

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Gardens & Parks

Tamborine National Park

Visit Queensland’s first national park on Mount Tamborine, in the Gold Coast Hinterland region, to enjoy the natural wonders of eucalypt forests, palm groves, prehistoric volcanic rock outcrops and lush subtropical waterfalls.Mount Tamborine National Park originated with the protection of the Witches Falls and has since expanded across the Tamborine plateau and surrounding foothills. Popular national park activities include walking the many mapped and marked bush trails, spotting Australian brush-turkeys and listening for the call of the threatened Albert’s lyrebird.Once you’ve explored the natural wilderness of Mount Tambourine National Park, be sure to indulge in the boutique beers, local wines and specialty crafts from the Tambourine Mountain township, which is known as a luxury getaway destination and hang gliding hotspot.

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Wildlife & Zoos

Whitsunday Crocodile Safari

The Whitsunday Crocodile Safari offers you the opportunity to see saltwater crocodiles in their natural environment as you cruise around the estuaries and wetlands between the Whitsunday coast and the Proserpine River. There are about 150 of the 'salties' living in the estuaries, so keep your camera ready - the chances of a sighting are good.As well as croc-spotting, you can keep an eye out for the many other kinds of native wildlife that live in these parts - birds, reptiles, marine creatures and mammals. In addition to the cruise through the estuaries, you'll be taken on a tractor-drawn wagon train ride through the Goorganga Wetlands and through melaleuca forest and mangrove systems. Your guides provide commentary and 'bush tucker' - damper (a kind of simple bread) and billy tea, cooked over a fire. They'll also try to catch you a mud crab so they can show you its features before releasing it back into the river.

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Gardens & Parks

Albert Park

Best known as the home of Formula 1 Grand Prix in March each year, Melbourne’s Albert Park is also a leafy inner-city retreat with a swan-filled lake, sports venues, playgrounds and a skyline view. Only three kilometres from the city centre, Albert Park is crown land that stretches more than 188 hectares into the south of Melbourne, making it a popular place for runners, dog-walkers and those in need of some fresh, green space. There are three main picnic areas to enjoy in Albert Park, all with picnic shelters, electric barbecues, shady trees, toilets and tables. From Aquatic Drive, you can take a stroll along the lakeside boardwalk, enjoy fine service and a steak at The Point restaurant, and watch sail boats tack across the lake. Sports lovers can enjoy the public golf course within Albert Park, try their hand at sailing from the boat shed or take a dip at Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre.

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Geological Formations

Twelve Apostles

Washed by crashing waves just off the craggy shoreline of western Victoria, the dramatic Twelve Apostles stand sentinel off the Great Ocean Road. Once joined to the surrounding mainland, the limestone outcrops are a Victorian icon and an enduring symbol of nature's mighty power and beauty.Pounded by surf and tide for thousands of years, the limestone crags are gradually being whittled down in number – currently only eight of the Twelve Apostles remain – and the neighbouring rocky arch known as London Bridge has collapsed into the roaring sea.The wild western Victorian coastline is a bewitching and beautiful part of Australia, the site of tragic shipwrecks in days gone by and the perfect place for exhilarating cliff-top walks, wreck diving and other untamed encounters with Mother Nature.

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Learn while traveling

Educate yourself while traveling

Witness diverse culture of people and learn history on the go.

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Classes & Workshops

Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Eco Tours

Bus Tours

Top Attractions

Art Galleries

Art Gallery of Western Australia

The Art Gallery of Western Australia is a world class museum located right in the heart of Perth.The gallery was founded in July 1895. Since its inception, the gallery has aimed to enrich Western Australia with great collections of art, bringing the art of the world to the state. In partnership with the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the gallery is presenting six exhibitions of work drawn from MoMA’s extensive collection between 2012 and 2015. Despite celebrating art from around the world, the gallery places a large emphasis on the arts of Australia and the Indian Ocean Rim. Programs, exhibitions and events are influenced heavily by art both local and close international proximity. This includes the permanent State Art Collection, showcasing Indigenous art and Western Australian art and design.

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Sights & Landmarks

Queensland Cultural Centre

Brisbane's cultural precinct is on South Bank, opposite the city center on the Brisbane River.The highlight of the Queensland Cultural Centre is the inspiring Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), which hosts a regular program of visiting and local exhibitions. It's the largest contemporary art gallery in Australia, and includes drama and film. Housed in another building is the Queensland Art Gallery and its collection of Australian and international art. Queensland Museum – South Bank documents the changing face of Brisbane and Queensland over the centuries, from culture and history to flora and fauna. You’ll also find the State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Performing Arts Centre and the Queensland Theatre Company in this lively arts hub.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Sovereign Hill

Australia’s foremost outdoor museum, Sovereign Hill takes history to a whole new level. Houses, shops and places of work have all been carefully crafted on the 25 hectare site to reproduce an 1850s mining town.The ‘township’ of over 60 historically recreated buildings revolves around Red Hill Mine. The Red Hill Mine is home to the second largest gold nugget in the world. The Welcome Nugget weighed 69kg, was almost 99% pure gold, and worth over $3million. A replica can be found at Sovereign Hill.When at Sovereign Hill, don’t pass up the opportunity to pan for some gold of your own! The gold diggings are the centre of the entire complex. The two mines on Sovereign Hill have regular guided tours. The Red Hill Mine tour is self-guided, whilst the Sovereign Quartz Mine is a 40 minute tour showing several displays.Main Street is the heart of the town, filled with shops and amenities that made life easier on the gold fields.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Australian War Memorial

One of Australia's most popular museums can be found at the Australian War Memorial.A visit to the mosaic Hall of the Memory and Commemorative Courtyard with its Roll of Honor is a moving and poignant experience, enhanced by the huge collection housed in the museum.Pictures, dioramas, models, relics, weaponry, uniforms and machinery evoke the experience of war, including a sound and light show in Anzac Hall.Guided tours explain the role played by Australian soldiers during the two world wars, as well as more recent conflicts.

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Religious Architecture

St Patrick's Cathedral

Located on the city’s eastern fringe and surrounded by gardens, St Patrick’s Cathedral is a striking feature on Melbourne’s skyline.Built in the Gothic Revival style of the early 14th century, the Cathedral layout is based on a Latin cross, with a nave and transepts, a sanctuary with seven chapels, and sacristies. Famed ecclesiastical architect William Wardell designed the cathedral as well as many of the brass items and mosaics that can be seen today including the sanctuary lamps, a Paschal candle stand and the eagle lectern. St Patrick’s excellent acoustics and original pipe organ make it popular with musicians and choral groups and a cathedral choir has existed here since 1939.Visitors are welcome to explore the cathedral and attend the daily mass, which is accompanied by organ and cantor on Sunday’s at 9.30am, 11am and 6.30pm.

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Buildings & Structure

Australian Parliament House

Canberra has two parliament houses: the Art Deco 1920s Old Parliament House and Canberra’s focal point, the new 1980s Parliament House.Dug into the surrounding green flank of Capital Hill, the grassed roof and triangular metal flagpole of Parliament House are a national symbol.The building’s central foyer is flanked by the House of Representatives on the east and the Senate on the west. Inside, native timbers, marble, mosaics, tapestries and embroidery feature in the spacious and lofty interior.Take a guided tour, and if Parliament is sitting you can watch the proceedings from the public gallery.If you have time, visit the imaginatively curated Old Parliament House adjacent. Clattering typewriters, ringing phones and overflowing in-trays re-create the drama and atmosphere of Canberra’s political life in decades gone by.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Melbourne Museum

Melbourne Museum provides a great experience for adults and children alike. A series of permanent exhibitions relating to the culture, history and the environment of Melbourne and Victoria are housed in several galleries including a lush Forest Gallery, an Aboriginal gallery and a Children’s area.Exhibitions include Science and Life, Melbourne Story, Evolution, Mind and Body, and many more. Get to see bones and displays of Australia’s mega fauna (giant animals), experience the Dinosaur Walk, Bugs Alive!, Amazing Animals and The Human Body. Temporary exhibitions run about twice a year and cover a variety of themes. Visiting from March to July 2013 are hidden treasures from Afghanistan temporarily donated by the National Museum in Kabul. The Museum also houses a good café, an IMAX center and – the museum’s most popular object – a taxidermy original of Australia’s most famous racehorse, Phar Lap.

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Art Galleries

Museum of Contemporary Art

The Museum of Contemporary Art has been showcasing the works of Australian artists in galleries designed to celebrate solo exhibitions since it first opened its doors back in 1991. The museum is housed in the former Maritime Services Board Building and offers visitors incredible views of the picturesque harbor and iconic opera house. Those who enjoy the Museum of Modern Art in New York City will likely find similar experimental work here. Travelers say that while the museum is small, it’s worth the trip and a quiet café on the fourth floor is perfect for post-museum tea or weekend brunch with a view.

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Buildings & Structure

Parliament House of Victoria

Impressively stoic, with bold white columns commanding attention, Parliament House of Victoria is one of Melbourne’s most recognisable landmarks. The great steps that lead to the entrance only hint at the opulence behind the impressive façade. Built in 1856, Parliament House of Victoria is the largest public Australian structure to be built in 19th Century.Visitor experiences in Parliament will depend heavily on whether Parliament is sitting. When Parliament is not sitting, the chambers, halls and eateries are open to the public. Visitors can take a 90 minute tour through the esteemed halls and chambers.After touring, visitors may relax with a traditional High Tea of finger sandwiches, scones with cream and jam, and assorted pastries at either The Parliament or The Corridor. During sitting weeks, visitors can only view live debates and decisions from the public galleries.

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Sights & Landmarks

Double Island Point Lighthouse

For 108 years, a lightkeeper here at Double Island Point Lighthouse was tasked with the job of keeping ships away from the Great Barrier Reef. Even though the light is now automated, however—having taken the lightkeeper’s place—the timber frame and romantic allure still accompany this historic, stoic tower in Great Sandy National Park. A popular spot with trekkers and sightseers, the lighthouse headland overlooks the coast and the turquoise waters below. White sand shoreline stretches out on both sides of the headland, which is only accessible by hiking trails or a 4x4 road down the beach. Whales and dolphins can be spotted offshore between the months of July–November, and surfers flock to the legendary wave that peels around the point. This is also a very popular stop between Noosa and Fraser Island, and offers one of the best views on Australia’s eastern coast. To see Double Island Point Lighthouse for yourself, embark on a 15-mile 4x4 drive from popular Rainbow Beach.

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Sights & Landmarks

Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse is situated on Bruny Island in Tasmania and is the second oldest lighthouse tower in the country. Commissioned by Governor George Arthur following a series of mishaps and shipwrecks just off Bruny Island, the lighthouse took two years to build by convict labor and was first lit in 1838.Technological advances in the 1980s and 1990s meant that the Cape Bruny Lighthouse was lit for the last time on 6 August 1996 and replaced by a solar powered light nearby. In December 2000, the lighthouse was declared part of the South Bruny National Park. Visitors should be prepared for rough roads and a steep walk to reach the lighthouse, although you’ll be well rewarded on arrival; with some fantastic views out to sea, migrating humpback and southern right whales have been spotted from this vantage point.

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Museums & Exhibitions

National Sports Museum

Ever since Australia’s independence—and even well before it—sport has been integral in helping Australia define its identity and culture. Here at the National Sports Museum inside the Melbourne Cricket Grounds, learn about some of Australia’s heroes in rugby, football, or boxing, and hear how sports have constantly inspired Australians to strive for their best. Read the stories of Australian Olympians and participate in interactive games, and brush up on history of Australian Rules Football, cricket, horse racing, and tennis. The Australian Sports Hall of Fame is housed inside the museum, as are the Australian Football Hall of Fame and Cricket Hall of Fame. A popular highlight is the Shane Warne hologram, where one of Australia’s legendary cricketers is seemingly brought to life, and the wealth of exhibits and informative displays make the National Sports Museum a “must-visit” spot for sports fans when visiting Melbourne.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Shrine of Remembrance

Stark and solemn, the Shrine of Remembrance is Melbourne’s memorial for all Australians who fought in a war. The Shrine was originally built to remember those who fought in World War One and is now open to the public for commemoration and education about all Australian victims of war. Permanent exhibitions show metals awarded to soldiers and records of service men and women. Temporary exhibitions and free daily tours at 11am and 2pm also allow visitors a chance to expand their understanding of Australia’s involvement in international conflicts. The unique shrine is easily recognised by the two identical porticoes supported by eight Doric columns and topped with a pyramidal roof inspired by an ancient Mausoleum. The result of combining the Athenian and Turkish architectural designs in a bold white structure is nothing short of stunning.

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Religious Architecture

St. Mary's Cathedral

St Mary's Cathedral is one of Sydney’s oldest and grandest buildings. Built on land given to the Catholic Church during the earliest days of colonization (1820), the original church was almost completely destroyed by fire and later rebuilt in its current form. The building that stands on Sydney’s central College Street today was constructed from Sydney sandstone and is regarded as one of the finest examples of an English-style Gothic Cathedral in the world.There are many notable architectural features in the Cathedral’s design, which was only fully realized 100 years after the architect William Wardell’s death. Most notable is the Cathedral’s local sandstone interior and façade, its beautiful stained glass windows (especially the three rose windows at the entrance and the huge chancel window), and the high central nave.

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Art Galleries

Art Gallery of New South Wales

When it comes to finding a great deal, the Art Gallery of New South Wales (NSW) is one of the top spots to hit in Sydney. Everything from the permanent galleries and celebrity talks to live performances and Wednesday night films are free to the public.Since 1871 this international destination, complete with grand courts, light-filled halls and stunning harbor views, has been showcasing one of the most diverse collections of artwork in the country. Travelers may have to pay an additional fee for temporary exhibits, but the permanent collection at Art Gallery NSW is large enough that visitors can while away a day soaking up Sydney culture.

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Buildings & Structure

Parliament House

The oldest building in Sydney, Parliament House is home to the political reigning body of New South Wales. Both the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council gather inside what once served as Sydney Hospital to make important decisions about the state’s operations. While ghosts are rumored to roam the building’s halls, visitors most often come to learn about its rich history and gain a better understanding of Sydney’s modern political operations.

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Buildings & Structure

State Library of New South Wales

Opened in 1826, Sydney’s State Library of New South Wales is the oldest library in Australia and a repository for a huge and diverse collection of books. The iconic building is also home to over 1 million photos, maps and manuscripts. Architecturally grand from the outside, inside is modern, bright and attractive, and the Mitchell Library looks straight out of a movie with its book-lined walls. The library also has five historic galleries in the Mitchell Wing which host both permanent and temporary free exhibitions — from collections of 18th-century Australian natural history illustrations to the diaries of Australian men and women writing in WWI.Next to Parliament House and the Royal Botanic Gardens on Macquarie Street, the State Library of New South Wales also has its own book club. And on a regular basis there are also talks on literary, historical, and contemporary issues. Film screenings and workshops are often held at the library too.

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Stadiums & Arenas

Flemington Racecourse

Melbourne’s historic racecourse has been the city’s premier horse racing venue since it first opened in 1840 and plays an important role in the history and identity of Melbourne and its people.A hive of activity during Melbourne’s Spring Racing Carnival in November each year, Flemington Racecourse (or ‘Flemington’ as it is more commonly called) is best known as the venue for the Melbourne Cup, the city’s internationally renowned horse race that attracts over 100,000 visitors each year and is the world’s richest turf race. Owned and run by the VRC (Victoria Racing Club), Flemington hosts racing events throughout the year and is recognised by the Victoria Heritage List as the most significant racing heritage site in Australia.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Royal Flying Doctor Service Alice Springs Tourist Facility (RFDS Museum)

The Royal Flying Doctors Service is the largest air medical response team in the world. The doctors fly an average of 40,000 miles (65,000 kilometers) a day attending to sick people in the remote outback of Australia. They have 53 aircraft operating out of 21 bases with 964 staff and attend to around 750 patients a day.Alice Springs houses the Central Operations of the service and at the visitors center you can learn all about the incredible history of the RFDS and how it has shaped life in the outback. There is an interactive museum where you can find out what it is like inside the planes, you can even fly one in the flight simulator. Experience life in the early days of the service and try your hand at the Traegar pedal-powered radio which was the primary means of communication for many years.

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Sights & Landmarks

Story Bridge

Story Bridge is Brisbane’s answer to Sydney’s Harbour Bridge. Iconic in its own right, Story Bridge is a heritage-listed, steel cantilever bridge that allows access between the northern and southern suburbs of Brisbane.Story Bridge was built between 1935 and 1939, and was known as Jubilee Bridge until mid 1940. The main attraction of Story Bridge, as splendid as it is to view from afar, are the bridge climbs which began in 2005. A guided tour takes visitors up the bridge to stunning panoramic views of the city, out to Moreton Bay, and west across the aptly named Scenic Rim as they stand 80 metres above sea level. It’s also possible to abseil down one of the bridge’s pylons and into Captain Burke Park.

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Experience fun and excitement

Have a good time

Travel long distances just for fun and explore places where being happy is a way of life.

Top Activities

Tickets & Passes

Top Attractions

Land Activities & Tours

Skyrail Rainforest Cableway

The rainforests of far north Queensland boast unparalled biodiversity, abounding with many unique plant species as well as possums, tree kangaroos, bats and a huge range of birdlife. But you needn’t necessarily rough it to get a taste of this tropical paradise. The Skyrail Cableway takes you on a 4.5 mile (7.5 kilometer) journey in a gondola above and through the tree treetops of the rainforest. Along the way you’ll see the dramatic Barron Gorge and stop off at 2 different points to explore boardwalks which snake through the canopy. Informative signs along the route mean this is a great way to find out more about a fascinating environment while disturbing it as little as possible. Arriving at Kuranda, you have the chance to visit an aviary and Australia’s largest butterfly sanctuary.

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Stadiums & Arenas

AAMI Park

With a bold profile of gleaming triangular panels in a unique bioframe roof, it’s no surprise that Melbourne’s AAMI Park has quickly become an iconic sporting stadium. Located only one kilometre from the city centre, between the sweeping Yarra River and the internationally-loved MCG, AAMI Park is Melbourne’s premier medium-sized soccer, rugby union and rugby league venue. AAMI Park’s star teams include the National Rugby League's Melbourne Storm, Melbourne’s Super Rugby team, the Melbourne Rebels, and soccer’s A-League teams, the Melbourne Victory and Melbourne Heart. The stadium has a capacity of more than 30,000 spectators and boasts a popular roof design that offers seating cover and a notable lack of pillars and walls obstructing the view. Recognizing the unique value of this Melbourne attraction, in 2012 AAMI Park was awarded the World’s Most Iconic and Culturally Significant Stadium by the Stadium World Congress.

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Sights & Landmarks

Eureka Skydeck 88

If early explorers could have had this view it would have made their jobs a lot easier. Situated high above Melbourne’s bustling streets, the Eureka Skydeck 88 is a 360-degree viewing platform towards the top of the Eureka Tower. From this elevated vantage point on the 88th floor, the Victorian countryside literally stretches from the mountains down towards the sea. Gaze east toward the 2,000-foot Mount Dandenong which can be coated with snow in winter, and south to the waters of Port Phillip and beachgoers lounging at St. Kilda. More than simply the view, however, it’s the Eureka Skydeck’s remarkable height that will leave you weak in the knees.Even the elevators to reach the platform are an adventure unto themselves, and the 40 seconds to cover 88 stories make them the fastest in the Southern Hemisphere. Once you’ve taken a lap of the 88th floor, step outside onto the open-air terrace to feel the wind rushing through your hair from nearly 1,000 feet off the ground.

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Go for a new adventure

Discover top adventure travel spots

Reward yourself with an opportunity to explore the nature in different and more radical way.

Top Activities

Outdoor Activities

4WD Tours

Nature and Wildlife Tours

Helicopter Tours

Top Attractions

Scenic Landmarks

Bondi to Coogee Beach Coastal Walk

Often referred to as one of the world’s most scenic coastal walkways, the trail between Coogee and Bondi Beach is the best day hike in Sydney. Starting at famous Bondi Beach—the iconic hangout of lifesavers, surfers and international travelers—the trail begins by the oceanfront pool on the southern end of the beach. Only a few minutes into the walk, an ancient Aboriginal rock carving is visible on the left side of the trail. In ten more minutes the trail emerges onto Tamarama Beach, which is cheekily referred to as “Glamarama” for the exceptionally attractive crowds. More family-friendly is Bronte Beach, which is the next stop in the trail’s procession of world-class white sand beaches. In addition to the playgrounds, BBQ pits, and large grassy park area, Bronte has two different natural pools that are perfect for a dip in the ocean. Past Bronte Beach and the bathing locals and surfers bobbing offshore.

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Geological Formations

Standley Chasm (Angkerle Atwatye)

Standley Chasm, also known as Angkerle, is a place of great significance to the local Aboriginal people. A spectacular slot gorge, the deep, narrow chasm cuts through the tough quartzite of the native stone and puts on a magnificent display of color and form as the sun passes through the sky.Surrounding the chasm is a lush valley and an abundance of walking trails. A short walk from the kiosk to the chasm is particularly rewarding at midday when the sun shines directly overhead. Another walk from the kiosk heads west and climbs to a saddle with views of the area's mountains and valleys. For more avid hikers, sections 3 and 4 of the Larapinta Trail meet at Standley Chasm and can be hiked as either long day trips or overnight hikes. Standley Chasm is the easiest place to access the Chewings Ranges for those who do not wish to hike the Larapinta Trail. The Chewings Ranges are home to some of the most rare and threatened wildlife of the West MacDonnell Ranges.

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Water Activities & Tours

Balmoral

Bondi. Coogee. Bronte. Manly—the list of famous Sydney beaches is as long as the coastline itself. The Balmoral beaches in Mosman, however, are often overlooked by Sydney visitors who instead head out to the coast. Unlike the larger, more popular beaches, Balmoral is located inside Sydney Harbor—only 15 minutes from downtown sights like the Opera House and The Rocks. Since the Balmoral beaches are protected from waves, surfers are swapped for picnickers and families all lounging out on the grass, and there are even swim zones with calm water surrounded by protective shark nets. The two beaches—Balmoral and Edwards—are separated by a wide, rocky point but linked by the shop-lined Esplanade, and kayaks, paddleboards, and even snorkel gear can be hired along the sand. Looking east out over the beach, visitors are met with sweeping views of the entrance to Sydney Harbor, where two opposing coastal headlands frame the rising sun.

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Geological Formations

The Gap

The eastern Sydney suburb of Watson’s Bay is more than just a charming fishing town—it’s also home to one of the most stunning views found anywhere in all of Sydney. At the cliff top viewpoint known as the “The Gap,” walkers are treated to a 360° panorama of Sydney’s Harbor and coastline. For all of its natural beauty, however, The Gap has a somewhat morbid history that is occasionally more famous than its view. In 1857, the Dunbar sailing ship was aiming for the Sydney Harbor entrance, but misjudged the entry point and was shipwrecked on the rocks.All of the 122 passengers aboard perished in the grisly wreck, except for one sailor who would end up tending a lighthouse along Australia’s coast. The Gap is also infamously known for its high number of suicides, with hundreds of Australians having leapt from the cliff to the icy waters below.

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Water Activities & Tours

Manly Beach

Straddling the peninsula of North Head on Sydney Harbour, the town of Manly is Sydney’s most popular seaside resort. It offers the best of both worlds, with calm harbor beaches on one side and wild ocean waves on the other. Linking the two is The Corso, lined with cafes and restaurants. Along with swimming, surfing, wining and dining, Manly’s most popular attraction is of course Oceanworld, on Manly Cove Beach on the harbor side of the town. Sharks and rays swim overhead curving walkways, or you can don a wetsuit and go diving with these monsters of the deep (if you dare!). Manly is surrounded by gorgeous beaches linked by scenic seaside walkways. Boating, kayaking, surfing and cycling are popular pastimes in summer, while winter is a good time to visit the historic former quarantine facility Q Station or take a North Harbour walk to Shelly Beach or The Spit.

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Water Activities & Tours

Bondi Beach

Australia’s most famous beach is a curving golden stretch of pale gold sand and turquoise waves. Attracting beach bunnies, surfer dudes and beach lovers alike, it’s one of Sydney’s favorite hot spots for catching the sun and people watching. Lifeguards patrol the often pounding waves, so it’s important to swim between the patrolled red and yellow flags. The sands of Bondi Beach are a popular spot for surfing lessons, beachside volleyball, yoga and community festivities, and the beach is overlooked by a stream of shops, restaurants and cafes for post-beach dining and relaxation. Picturesque coastal walks lead from Bondi over the seaside cliffs to the neighboring beaches of Clovelly and Bronte, and to the romantic Victorian cemetery overlooking the coast at Waverley.

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Celebrate a special occasion

Go for a romance travel

Escape from home routine and find a romantic place to celebrate your special occasion.

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Tickets & Passes

Half-day Tours

City Tours

Full-day Tours

Top Attractions

Theatres & Cinemas

Melbourne Regent Theatre

An evening of glamour and performance awaits you at Melbourne’s landmark Regent Theatre on Collins Street. Golden and ornate, with velvet drapes, gleaming chandeliers, rich tones and stunning Renaissance Revival architecture, The Regent Theatre offers old-world elegance and a contemporary events schedule. This historic Melbourne theatre dates back to 1929, when it was a grand picture palace opening just before the start of the Great Depression. Since then, the theatre has endured fire and flood, depression and wartime, dereliction and city development, and has been honoured by the National Trust of Australia and the Victorian Heritage Register. The refurbished theatre was reopened in 1996 to seat more than 2000 people. The theatre has since hosted some of the biggest stage productions to show in Australia, such as The Lion King, Pricilla Queen of the Dessert, Wicked, Westside Story and Cats. It is also one of the Melbourne Comedy Festival venues.

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Fun & Games

Esplanade Boardwalk

The Esplanade Boardwalk is the heartbeat of Cairns. Located along the scenic coast, this outdoor promenade is the perfect place for weary travelers to stretch their legs and take in the natural sights. The three-mile pathway winds through damp lagoons ideal for birding, past scenic points of interest and historic relics left behind from World War II. Trendy shops, sidewalk restaurants and bustling pubs are all within walking distance of the well-traveled Esplanade. And nearby public BBQs and outdoor exercise stations are the prime spots for striking up conversations with locals, who love the Esplanade Boardwalk almost as much as visitors.

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Fun & Games

Block Arcade

The Block Arcade is a heritage-shopping arcade that was built in the late 1800s. Restored to its original glory, the arcade still features its original mosaic tiled flooring, glass canopied ceiling and wrought iron and carved stone finishes. In conjunction with Melbourne’s Royal Arcade, The Block Arcade forms part of the city’s Golden Mile heritage walk that cuts through the center of the CBD and offers a unique shopping experience. Much loved shops within the arcade include the popular Hopetoun Tea Rooms (Melbourne’s original spot for high tea and still home to the city’s most drool-worthy window display!), Dafel Dolls & Bears toy shop and Haigh’s Chocolates. You can enter The Block Arcade from its official entrance on Collins Street or via Elizabeth Street (west) or the pedestrian laneway off Little Collins Street.

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Fun & Games

Pitt Street Mall

A pedestrian area of downtown Sydney, the Pitt Street Mall offers some of the most exciting shopping in the city. In the area of just one block lies several flagship stores and more than 500 retail spaces, housed in some of the most expensive commercial real estate in Australia. Specialty stores to suit all tastes can be found in the seven shopping centers, including The Strand Arcade, Westfield Sydney, Myer, and David Jones. Many of the centers were refurbished as recently as 2011. Shops vary from couture and classic fashion, to budget chain stores, electronics, and the latest in athletic wear. A visit here will certainly include some of the best shopping in Sydney, along with the bustling activity of this urban center. A footbridge runs across the mall, providing ample opportunities to take in the sights of people passing by. Restaurants and cafes provide replenishment from all the action.

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Land Activities & Tours

Shelly Beach

If you’re visiting Sydney and watching the sunset while standing out on the sand, then you must be standing on Shelly Beach—the only westward facing beach on Australia’s eastern coast. Located south of popular Manly, Shelly Beach is a smaller and quieter place to soak up some sun. The waters here in Cabbage Tree Bay are part of a protected reserve, where a small reef creates calm conditions for snorkeling, swimming, and diving. Over 150 species of marine life inhabit Cabbage Tree Bay—and the shallow waters of 30 feet or less means there’s actually a good chance of finding them. On Shelley’s western end, out towards the reef, watch as surfers rip apart waves at the surf spot known as “Bower’s,” and even when the waves are overhead, Shelley Beach is still protected when compared to east-facing Manly. On the short stroll from Manly to Shelly, stop to admire the Fairy Bower pool that juts out into the sea, or grab a bite at Le Kiosk restaurant across the street from the sand.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Churchill Island

The Churchill Island Heritage Farm is one of Melbourne’s most unique attractions. A tiny island off the coast of Phillip Island, Churchill Island is occupied entirely by the Churchill Island Heritage Farm. Churchill Island was one of the first places in Victoria to be used for agriculture. Farmed since 1798, the island retains its heritage by showcasing pioneer farming techniques to visitors in its current incarnation as an historic working farm. The Churchill Island Heritage Farm Visitor Centre contains an exhibition on the history of the island, as well as a giftshop and café. The real attraction of the island however is the farm life. Daily farming activities include cow milking, sheep shearing and more. Visitors can also circumnavigate the island on a walking track with fantastic views. The farm hosts a farmers market on the fourth Saturday of each month with lots of local produce.

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Places of Natural Beauty

North Stradbroke Island (Straddie)

North Stradbroke Island, nicknamed “Straddie” by the locals, offers a low-key escape from Brisbane. The picturesque island, the most popular of all the islands in Moreton Bay, is lined by white sand beaches on its eastern shores, while the interior is dotted with freshwater lakes.The first inhabitants of the island showed up some 40,000 years ago, and members of three Australian Aboriginal groups call the island home today. Before you begin your explorations of the island, spend some time learning about the island’s long history at the North Stradbroke Island Historical Museum.Besides the museum, all of Straddie’s other attractions revolve around Mother Nature. Along the coast, it’s possible to spot dolphins, manta rays, sea turtles and humpback whales, and more something a little more active, you can dive, surf, fish, sand board, sea kayak or take a 4WD tour of the island’s interior.

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Farms

Bruny Island Berry Farm

Bruny Island has a reputation as an Australian foodie paradise, and the Bruny Island Berry Farm is part of the reason why. Here on this family-owned berry farm near the shores of Adventure Bay, locally-grown berries are deliciously transformed into ice cream, scones, jams, cheesecakes, and a wide assortment of desserts. If some of the farm’s 7,000 strawberry plants happen to be in season, visitors have the chance to wander the fields and pick their own berries from the vines. Blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, and youngberries all sweeten a visit to the farm, and even if the berries aren’t currently in season, the rural café is a relaxing spot for a coffee, tea, or scone.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Garden Island

When Sydney’s original European settlers arrived in Sydney Harbor, they sustained themselves by planting a garden here at Garden Island. Today, after land was reclaimed and filled in with rocks, Garden Island is now a point that juts out into the harbor, and houses the Royal Australian Navy’s eastern fleet of ships. During World War II, a Japanese mini sub infiltrated the harbor and sank an Australian ship—resulting in the death of 21 sailors from the Australian and British navies. Much more history is outlined in depth at the Royal Australian Navy Heritage Center—a fascinating museum here on Pott’s Point that’s a must for history or war buffs. Once finished perusing the Heritage Center, which is fantastically free of charge, take a stroll through the gardens and grounds that are hidden behind the museum, where BBQ grills and views of the harbor make the perfect spot for a picnic.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Fraser Island

Fraser Island is both the largest sand island in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Sitting off of the Sunshine Coast, it stretches over 123km (76mi) long, and every inch is a haven of sandy beaches and stunning cliff faces. Home to the famous dingo, Fraser Island is also host to over 300 different species of bird as well as wallabies, possums, dugongs, flying foxes, and turtles. Nature lovers will enjoy the unique wildlife composition that the island offers as well as the gorgeous climate. While you're visiting, be sure to visit Lake Mackenzie, the "crown jewel" of Fraser Island. The crystalline blue waters and shimming white sands make it one of the most popular tourist destinations. For a taste of history, check out the Maheno Shipwreck, which occurred in 1935. Just north of the beautiful freshwater Eli Creek, learn about the true strength of the sea on this incredible passenger steamer.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Bruny Island

Outdoor activities, fishing and relaxing are your reasons for coming to Bruny Island, off Tasmania’s south-east coast. Two north and south islands joined by a long narrow isthmus, Bruny is a favorite destination for weekending Hobart residents and visitors wanting to escape the rat race. Along with surfing and exploring the wild windswept coast, spotting wildlife is a highlight of a visit to Bruny Island. If you’re lucky, you might spot penguins, echidnas, mutton birds and cormorants. The vibe is low-key on Bruny, with no resorts just holiday homes and guesthouses. There are a few shops for supplies and a museum detailing the history of the island and the explorers who came here, from Bligh to D’Entrecasteaux. The lighthouse is one of the island’s few landmarks.

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Try exciting meals

Experience a variety of food on the trip

Escape from ordinary everyday meals and reward yourself with delicious and special gourmet dishes.

Top Activities

Dining Experiences

Lunch Cruises

Top Attractions

Winery

Peter Lehmann Wines

This favorite mid-size South Australian vineyard was built in just five months back in 1980. Since then, its luscious red and white wines have been celebrated both locally and internationally, and its true family farm feel has been welcoming visitors for generations. After learning touring the grounds and learning about the practice of wine making, travelers can saddle up to the Weighbridge—now known affectionately as Peter’s Bar—for a taste of Peter Lehmann’s bold Shiraz. Growers have been gathering at the Weighbridge after a long day’s work since the vineyard first opened. Today visitors can join them in the same age-old tradition, too.

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Winery

McLaren Vale

McLaren Vale is an area just outside Adelaide towards the coast which is renowned for the wine it produces. With 76 cellar doors to visit, it's worth spending at least a day exploring, if not a weekend. And it's not just wine, the local foodies are passionate about what their kitchens produce. When you've eaten and sipped your fill, there are many other things to do including bushwalking, heading to the surf beach, following the Art Trail, going fishing, horse-riding, cycling or just sitting on a cliff watching the sunset.

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Market

Adelaide Central Market

Remember the days of buying your fresh fruit and vegetables direct from the people who grow it? The thrill of bargaining, and buying according to what's in season, with a recommendation of what's best tasting at the moment and how you should eat it? You can still experience that at Adelaide Central Market. For 140 years this market in the heart of the city has been providing residents with fresh produce. Over 80 stalls selling direct from the producers, include fruit and vegetables, meats and seafood, bakeries, cheeses, small goods and plants and flowers. There are cafes to rest in with a coffee or snack after an invigorating session of bargaining.

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Australia

25 Featured Attractions

Art Galleries

Art Gallery of Western Australia

The Art Gallery of Western Australia is a world class museum located right in the heart of Perth.The gallery was founded in July 1895. Since its inception, the gallery has aimed to enrich Western Australia with great collections of art, bringing the art of the world to the state. In partnership with the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the gallery is presenting six exhibitions of work drawn from MoMA’s extensive collection between 2012 and 2015. Despite celebrating art from around the world, the gallery places a large emphasis on the arts of Australia and the Indian Ocean Rim. Programs, exhibitions and events are influenced heavily by art both local and close international proximity. This includes the permanent State Art Collection, showcasing Indigenous art and Western Australian art and design.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Valley of the Giants

The Valley of the Giants sits in the Walpole-Nornalup National Park and is home to hundreds of ancient Red Tingle Trees. The main attraction is the Treetop Walk that sets visitors 130 feet (40 meters) up among the forest canopy on a lightweight bridge for a bird's-eye view. The Ancient Empire Walk is a series of boardwalks at ground level that weave around–and occasionally through–the massive tree trunks. Red Tingle Trees are among the world’s tallest trees, some of which are over 400 years old, with trunk circumferences up to 50 feet (15 meters) around.Both the Treetop Walk and the Ancient Empire Walk are around 650 yards (600 meters) in length and both are suitable for walkers of all skills. The Ancient Empire Walk does contain some sections of earthen paths that may become muddy after rain, but the walks are otherwise suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. The Valley of the Giants also has barbecue areas for picnicking and public toilets available.

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Land Activities & Tours

Skyrail Rainforest Cableway

The rainforests of far north Queensland boast unparalled biodiversity, abounding with many unique plant species as well as possums, tree kangaroos, bats and a huge range of birdlife. But you needn’t necessarily rough it to get a taste of this tropical paradise. The Skyrail Cableway takes you on a 4.5 mile (7.5 kilometer) journey in a gondola above and through the tree treetops of the rainforest. Along the way you’ll see the dramatic Barron Gorge and stop off at 2 different points to explore boardwalks which snake through the canopy. Informative signs along the route mean this is a great way to find out more about a fascinating environment while disturbing it as little as possible. Arriving at Kuranda, you have the chance to visit an aviary and Australia’s largest butterfly sanctuary.

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Gardens & Parks

Enchanted Adventure Garden

Dive into nature’s wonderland! The Enchanted Adventure Garden, situated on the Mornington Peninsula at scenic Arthurs Seat, offers 22 acres of outdoor thrills and adventures. Seasonal gardens bursting with vibrant colors set the backdrop for activities, as travelers can cruise through the treetops with a canopy walk, get lost in the hedge maze, or zipline through the greenery. Adventure-seekers will love tree surfing and tube sliding. Other options include getting lost among the hedge topiary sculptures, wandering through the bushland obstacles and relaxing with a picnic at the onsite café and take it all in.

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Theatres & Cinemas

Melbourne Regent Theatre

An evening of glamour and performance awaits you at Melbourne’s landmark Regent Theatre on Collins Street. Golden and ornate, with velvet drapes, gleaming chandeliers, rich tones and stunning Renaissance Revival architecture, The Regent Theatre offers old-world elegance and a contemporary events schedule. This historic Melbourne theatre dates back to 1929, when it was a grand picture palace opening just before the start of the Great Depression. Since then, the theatre has endured fire and flood, depression and wartime, dereliction and city development, and has been honoured by the National Trust of Australia and the Victorian Heritage Register. The refurbished theatre was reopened in 1996 to seat more than 2000 people. The theatre has since hosted some of the biggest stage productions to show in Australia, such as The Lion King, Pricilla Queen of the Dessert, Wicked, Westside Story and Cats. It is also one of the Melbourne Comedy Festival venues.

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Sights & Landmarks

Lygon Street

Just north of Melbourne’s CBD, is Lygon Street, the main street in the city’s old Italian quarter. Still referred to by some as ‘little Italy’, Lygon Street was once the epicenter of Melbourne’s café culture and more than part way responsible for the city’s enduring caffeine obsession. Victorian terraces still line the street and several Italian restaurants continue to beckon passers-by to eat and drink at their street-side tables.As you walk along Lygon Street you get a sense of its diversity: Italian-influenced restaurants, cafes, cake shops and gelati bars still dominate the scene but you will also discover a whole swathe of mainstream and boutique clothing stores, one of Melbourne’s best independent bookstores (Readings Books & Music); La Mama Theatre and Cinema Nova, Melbourne’s largest and most treasured arthouse cinema.

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Winery

Peter Lehmann Wines

This favorite mid-size South Australian vineyard was built in just five months back in 1980. Since then, its luscious red and white wines have been celebrated both locally and internationally, and its true family farm feel has been welcoming visitors for generations. After learning touring the grounds and learning about the practice of wine making, travelers can saddle up to the Weighbridge—now known affectionately as Peter’s Bar—for a taste of Peter Lehmann’s bold Shiraz. Growers have been gathering at the Weighbridge after a long day’s work since the vineyard first opened. Today visitors can join them in the same age-old tradition, too.

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Sights & Landmarks

Queensland Cultural Centre

Brisbane's cultural precinct is on South Bank, opposite the city center on the Brisbane River.The highlight of the Queensland Cultural Centre is the inspiring Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), which hosts a regular program of visiting and local exhibitions. It's the largest contemporary art gallery in Australia, and includes drama and film. Housed in another building is the Queensland Art Gallery and its collection of Australian and international art. Queensland Museum – South Bank documents the changing face of Brisbane and Queensland over the centuries, from culture and history to flora and fauna. You’ll also find the State Library of Queensland, the Queensland Performing Arts Centre and the Queensland Theatre Company in this lively arts hub.

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Winery

McLaren Vale

McLaren Vale is an area just outside Adelaide towards the coast which is renowned for the wine it produces. With 76 cellar doors to visit, it's worth spending at least a day exploring, if not a weekend. And it's not just wine, the local foodies are passionate about what their kitchens produce. When you've eaten and sipped your fill, there are many other things to do including bushwalking, heading to the surf beach, following the Art Trail, going fishing, horse-riding, cycling or just sitting on a cliff watching the sunset.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Sovereign Hill

Australia’s foremost outdoor museum, Sovereign Hill takes history to a whole new level. Houses, shops and places of work have all been carefully crafted on the 25 hectare site to reproduce an 1850s mining town.The ‘township’ of over 60 historically recreated buildings revolves around Red Hill Mine. The Red Hill Mine is home to the second largest gold nugget in the world. The Welcome Nugget weighed 69kg, was almost 99% pure gold, and worth over $3million. A replica can be found at Sovereign Hill.When at Sovereign Hill, don’t pass up the opportunity to pan for some gold of your own! The gold diggings are the centre of the entire complex. The two mines on Sovereign Hill have regular guided tours. The Red Hill Mine tour is self-guided, whilst the Sovereign Quartz Mine is a 40 minute tour showing several displays.Main Street is the heart of the town, filled with shops and amenities that made life easier on the gold fields.

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Sights & Landmarks

Milsons Point

Travelers love Milsons Point because of the uninterrupted views of Harbour Bridge and the iconic Opera House. During hot summer nights, locals gather on this tiny peninsula in Sydney Harbour opposite Sydney Cove and watch the sun dip down over the central business district skyline. This quiet spot has become a destination for those looking to capture a perfect picture of the city.When day turns to night, young couples can be found holding hands as they stroll along the neon-lit midway of nearby Luna Park. The low-key crowd will appreciate the well-manicured suburbs of the north shore that are ripe with quiet cafes, continental restaurants and plenty of friendly locals.

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Cultural/Heritage Places

Waradah Australian Centre

If you want to know more about Australia’s indigenous owners and wish to see or purchase genuine Aboriginal arts and craft, consider a visit to the Waradah Aboriginal Centre (sometimes referred to as Koomurri Aboriginal Centre) in Katoomba in the Blue Mountains.One of Australia’s best Aboriginal cultural centers, Waradah is the place to learn more about Australia’s unique heritage and first peoples, as well as witness traditional Aboriginal dance and didgeridoo performances. Various shows featuring Aboriginal dancers or musicians in traditional costume are scheduled throughout the day and include an introduction to the story and an explanation of the significance of each performance.The recently refurbished fine art gallery contains genuine Australian Aboriginal paintings, while the center’s shop has a large collection of more affordable and varied Aboriginal art and crafts, such as totem statues, ceramics, glasswork and didgeridoos.

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Market

Adelaide Central Market

Remember the days of buying your fresh fruit and vegetables direct from the people who grow it? The thrill of bargaining, and buying according to what's in season, with a recommendation of what's best tasting at the moment and how you should eat it? You can still experience that at Adelaide Central Market. For 140 years this market in the heart of the city has been providing residents with fresh produce. Over 80 stalls selling direct from the producers, include fruit and vegetables, meats and seafood, bakeries, cheeses, small goods and plants and flowers. There are cafes to rest in with a coffee or snack after an invigorating session of bargaining.

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Sights & Landmarks

Coolangatta

Situated at the southern end of Australia’s famous Gold Coast, Coolangatta has accommodations and attractions that are affordable for virtually every traveler, from the budget conscious backpackers to high rollers. This prosperous suburb has a shared economy with nearby Tweed Heads, and in some ways, with the rest of the coastal region as well. It repeatedly appears in popular culture worldwide, most recently as the setting for fictitious town in 1994’s Muriel's Wedding.Until recently, Coolangatta played host to the annual Wintersun Festival, a two-week extravaganza celebrating the 1950s and 1960s with free entertainment and attractions each June. The festival included hot rods, restored and remodeled cars, and throwback, revival bands performing era-appropriate music.

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Fun & Games

Esplanade Boardwalk

The Esplanade Boardwalk is the heartbeat of Cairns. Located along the scenic coast, this outdoor promenade is the perfect place for weary travelers to stretch their legs and take in the natural sights. The three-mile pathway winds through damp lagoons ideal for birding, past scenic points of interest and historic relics left behind from World War II. Trendy shops, sidewalk restaurants and bustling pubs are all within walking distance of the well-traveled Esplanade. And nearby public BBQs and outdoor exercise stations are the prime spots for striking up conversations with locals, who love the Esplanade Boardwalk almost as much as visitors.

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Fun & Games

Block Arcade

The Block Arcade is a heritage-shopping arcade that was built in the late 1800s. Restored to its original glory, the arcade still features its original mosaic tiled flooring, glass canopied ceiling and wrought iron and carved stone finishes. In conjunction with Melbourne’s Royal Arcade, The Block Arcade forms part of the city’s Golden Mile heritage walk that cuts through the center of the CBD and offers a unique shopping experience. Much loved shops within the arcade include the popular Hopetoun Tea Rooms (Melbourne’s original spot for high tea and still home to the city’s most drool-worthy window display!), Dafel Dolls & Bears toy shop and Haigh’s Chocolates. You can enter The Block Arcade from its official entrance on Collins Street or via Elizabeth Street (west) or the pedestrian laneway off Little Collins Street.

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Fun & Games

Pitt Street Mall

A pedestrian area of downtown Sydney, the Pitt Street Mall offers some of the most exciting shopping in the city. In the area of just one block lies several flagship stores and more than 500 retail spaces, housed in some of the most expensive commercial real estate in Australia. Specialty stores to suit all tastes can be found in the seven shopping centers, including The Strand Arcade, Westfield Sydney, Myer, and David Jones. Many of the centers were refurbished as recently as 2011. Shops vary from couture and classic fashion, to budget chain stores, electronics, and the latest in athletic wear. A visit here will certainly include some of the best shopping in Sydney, along with the bustling activity of this urban center. A footbridge runs across the mall, providing ample opportunities to take in the sights of people passing by. Restaurants and cafes provide replenishment from all the action.

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Gardens & Parks

Point Nepean National Park

One of Victoria’s most significant landscapes, Point Nepean National Park spans more than 1,000 acres (560 hectares) on the pristine Mornington Peninsula. Visitors can immerse themselves in the coastal views and native grasslands while exploring the rich history of the park. What began as indigenous land became one of the earliest European settlements in Victoria during 1845, then a quarantine station before the site turned into a military center. In addition to its rich culture, the park is host to a world of marine life, including emerald-colored sea shrubs and invertebrates.Discover Victorian landmarks, such as the park’s highest point, Cheviot Hill, overlooking the jetty where Prime Minister Harold Holt disappeared in 1967. History buffs can visit Fort Nepean for panoramic views and explore military fortifications used in both World Wars. Numerous hiking trails and beach walks of varied length start in the park.

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Museums & Exhibitions

Australian War Memorial

One of Australia's most popular museums can be found at the Australian War Memorial.A visit to the mosaic Hall of the Memory and Commemorative Courtyard with its Roll of Honor is a moving and poignant experience, enhanced by the huge collection housed in the museum.Pictures, dioramas, models, relics, weaponry, uniforms and machinery evoke the experience of war, including a sound and light show in Anzac Hall.Guided tours explain the role played by Australian soldiers during the two world wars, as well as more recent conflicts.

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Religious Architecture

St Patrick's Cathedral

Located on the city’s eastern fringe and surrounded by gardens, St Patrick’s Cathedral is a striking feature on Melbourne’s skyline.Built in the Gothic Revival style of the early 14th century, the Cathedral layout is based on a Latin cross, with a nave and transepts, a sanctuary with seven chapels, and sacristies. Famed ecclesiastical architect William Wardell designed the cathedral as well as many of the brass items and mosaics that can be seen today including the sanctuary lamps, a Paschal candle stand and the eagle lectern. St Patrick’s excellent acoustics and original pipe organ make it popular with musicians and choral groups and a cathedral choir has existed here since 1939.Visitors are welcome to explore the cathedral and attend the daily mass, which is accompanied by organ and cantor on Sunday’s at 9.30am, 11am and 6.30pm.

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Buildings & Structure

Australian Parliament House

Canberra has two parliament houses: the Art Deco 1920s Old Parliament House and Canberra’s focal point, the new 1980s Parliament House.Dug into the surrounding green flank of Capital Hill, the grassed roof and triangular metal flagpole of Parliament House are a national symbol.The building’s central foyer is flanked by the House of Representatives on the east and the Senate on the west. Inside, native timbers, marble, mosaics, tapestries and embroidery feature in the spacious and lofty interior.Take a guided tour, and if Parliament is sitting you can watch the proceedings from the public gallery.If you have time, visit the imaginatively curated Old Parliament House adjacent. Clattering typewriters, ringing phones and overflowing in-trays re-create the drama and atmosphere of Canberra’s political life in decades gone by.

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Water & Amusement Parks

Luna Park Melbourne

Enter through the iconic mouth of Mr Moon to experience the innocent joys of Melbourne’s Luna Park in St Kilda.This ultimate city fair has brightened St Kilda’s Lower Esplanade for more than a century, featuring a classic Ferris Wheel, the Jewel in the Crown Carousel, the Silly Serpent Rollercoaster and a haunted Ghost Train, as well as many other family-fun and thrilling rides. The most famous Luna Park ride is the Scenic Railway Roller Coaster, which has delighted passengers with paramount views of Port Phillip Bay since the Park opened in 1912.

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Places of Natural Beauty

Cape York Peninsula

With its vast wetlands, rambling eucalyptus forests and sun-soaked beaches, the remote wilderness of the Cape York Peninsula is a heady concoction for adventure-seekers. Stretching up to the northernmost tip of Queensland, the region’s off-the-beaten-track location, annual monsoons and tropical climate keep the majority of tourists away. Those who do venture north, however, are rewarded with spectacular coastal views, miles of unspoiled jungle and an abundance of colorful wildlife.The best time to visit the cape is during the dry season (May-November), when 4WD tours are the most convenient way to get around. At the southern end of the peninsula, highlights include the historic town of Cooktown, the tranquil Charlotte Bay and the Lakefield, Cape Melville and Starke National Parks.

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Gardens & Parks

Kakadu National Park

Kakadu National Park has a feeling and a beauty unlike anywhere else on earth. With its sandstone escarpments looming up from the plain, its secret waterholes and lily-strewn waterways, its teeming birdlife and ancient rock art, it's a place that will get a hold on something old in your soul.It's Australia's largest national park, clocking in at a mindboggling 1.7 million hectares (4.2 million acres). In that vast space shelters a staggering multiplicity of fauna, including dingos, wallabies and saltwater crocodiles. There's plants and animals here that are found nowhere else in the world, and a number of endangered species.Make sure to take a cruise along one of the numerous park rivers - cruising along the Alligator River will allow to discover amazing birds and see crocs up close safely. Yellow Water near Cooina is a good starting point for sunrise cruises, usually the best time of the day for wildlife viewing.

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Stadiums & Arenas

AAMI Park

With a bold profile of gleaming triangular panels in a unique bioframe roof, it’s no surprise that Melbourne’s AAMI Park has quickly become an iconic sporting stadium. Located only one kilometre from the city centre, between the sweeping Yarra River and the internationally-loved MCG, AAMI Park is Melbourne’s premier medium-sized soccer, rugby union and rugby league venue. AAMI Park’s star teams include the National Rugby League's Melbourne Storm, Melbourne’s Super Rugby team, the Melbourne Rebels, and soccer’s A-League teams, the Melbourne Victory and Melbourne Heart. The stadium has a capacity of more than 30,000 spectators and boasts a popular roof design that offers seating cover and a notable lack of pillars and walls obstructing the view. Recognizing the unique value of this Melbourne attraction, in 2012 AAMI Park was awarded the World’s Most Iconic and Culturally Significant Stadium by the Stadium World Congress.

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