Crystal Compass

Travel Today to See different sceneries

See different sceneries

Discover a vast number of beautiful places in our planet that you may not even know about yet.

Photo by Photoholgic on Unsplash

Featured Destinations

Featured Destinations in April

 

25 Featured Attractions

Places of Natural Beauty

Doubtful Sound

Breathtaking Doubtful Sound is one of the most pristine wilderness areas in the world. A striking place of soaring peaks and still, calm waters it is nick-named "Sound of Silence" because of the incredible stillness and peace that fills the sound. One minute it might be all sunshine and bright skies and the next it will be shrouded in fog and mystery.The sound is a long fingered fiord gouged by glaciers between 15,000 and 75,000 years ago it is three times longer and ten times bigger than the more popular and accessible nearby Milford Sound. The sound comprises of three fingers and is full of stunning waterfalls and islets. The islets are prime spots to view Fiordland Crested Penguins and New Zealand Fur Seals.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Sonoran Desert

The Sonoran Desert is a 100,000 square mile (260,000 square kilometers) arid region in North America that stretches across large portions of Arizona, California, and the northwest Mexican states of Sonora, Baja California, and Baja California Sur. Although it is the hottest of the four North American deserts, its distinct bimodal rainfall (raining heavily both in the summer and winter) makes the region extremely biologically developed and diverse. The Sonoran Desert is home to some of the most unique animal and plant life in North America, many of which cannot be found anywhere else. For example, the only remaining jaguar population in the United States (estimated between 80 to 120 jaguars), can be found in the Sonoran Desert. Other more well-known animals include roadrunners, gila monsters, cactus wren, and desert bighorn sheep.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Vatnajokull National Park

Covering an area of 12,000 square-kilometers and encompassing the former National Parks of Jökulsárgljúfur and Skaftafell, Vatnajokull National Park has been collecting superlatives since it was established in 2008. The park is now Western Europe’s largest national park (covering almost 13% of the country), dominated by the Vatnajökull glacier, Europe’s largest glacier, and containing Iceland's highest mountain, Öraefajökull, and deepest lake, Jökulsárlón. An unyielding landscape of land and fire, Vatnajökull presents some of Iceland’s most diverse and dramatic scenery including glacial plateaus, active volcanoes, towering ice caps, beaches of black ash and bubbling geothermal terrain. The southern territory of Skaftafell is the gateway to the most accessible area of the glacier and one of the most popular regions of the park, with the Skaftafell Visitor Center providing a detailed introduction to the park’s many geological wonders.

Learn More

Water & Amusement Parks

Niagara SkyWheel

At Niagara SkyWheel, you’ll get a bird’s-eye-view of Niagara Falls as you soar 53 meters (175 feet) high in the air in the largest observation wheel in Canada. It’s most popular to ride the Niagara Skywheel around dusk, when Niagara Falls gets lit up in the colors of the rainbow for the famous Falls Illumination show. At night, you’ll also see Clifton Hills and the city skyline lights.On the 12- to 15-minute ride, you’ll get four or more rotations in the Ferris wheel, and groups and families get to ride in their own gondola. A popular destination for taking photos of Niagara Falls from a new angle, you can see for miles in every direction, and you’ll be able to capture both Horseshoe and American Falls in one shot. Time your trip for 10 p.m., and you may also get to see the iconic fireworks over the falls from your carriage. Opened in 2006, the SkyWheel is in the heart of Clifton Hill, Niagara Falls' main entertainment district for vacationing families.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Three Sisters

In a country known for walkabouts and wandering it’s no surprise one of the biggest attractions is also one of the most mythical. According to local folklore, three sisters once fell in love with three men from a different tribe—a love that was forbidden. When the men tried to capture and marry the women war broke out and the ladies were turned to stone to protect them.Today, travelers who flock to Blue Mountain Park ascend the 800-plus stairs to the valley floor in order to catch a glimpse of the stones that tower hundreds of meters into the sky.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Mitre Peak

Set smack in the middle of Milford Sound, Mitre Peak is the undisputed star in an already impressive show. Craggy, lonely and often shrouded in mist, this iconic spire thrusts a mile upwards from the placid waters of the Sound. When you arrive in Milford Sound after the serpentine road through the mountains, Mitre Peak rises before you like a sentinel to congratulate you on making the journey. This is easily one of the most oft-photographed sites in New Zealand—and when you stare at its stoic profile against the water you can immediately understand why.To get a closer view of Mitre Peak, crane your neck upwards at the 5,500-foot summit during a cruise of Milford Sound. Or, paddle beneath its alpine shadow as you kayak in search of marine life.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Braulio Carrillo National Park

The vast protected forest of Braulio Carrillo National Park may be divided by one of the nation’s busiest highways, but this just means easy access for travelers, as well as the possibility of picturesque views without ever having to leave the car. Lazy travelers can traverse the highway snapping photos of lush landscapes from the comfort of their car seats, while those eager to get back to nature can embark on one of the miles of trails leading to the waterfalls, open pastures and mountain stations that dot the rainforest. An Aerial tram on the eastern side of the park offers open gondola rides through the dense understory and canopy of the woods, where its possible to spot the sloth and other forest creatures that call Braulio Carrillo National Park home.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Kinabalu National Park

Kinabalu National Park hugs the base of Mount Kinabalu like a lush, thick blanket. Sharing the same incredible biodiversity and UNESCO World Heritage status as the mountain that towers above it, Kinabalu National Park is recognised as one of the most important biological sites in the world. For those who can’t conceive climbing Mount Kinabalu’s challenging slopes. Kinabalu National Parks presents an excellent alternative. Home to an estimated 5,500 plant species, including several hundred varieties of orchids and pitcher plants, 326 bird species and over 100 mammals, a walk in the park has never been this diverse. There are 11km (7mi) of marked and graded trails across the Park, many of which cut across the mountain forest vegetation, which ranges from from rich dipterocarp and coniferous forests to montain oak and alpine meadow plants.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Journey Behind the Falls

Horseshoe Falls is an awesome site from the shore and from a boat, but the best way to truly experience its absolute power is to take the Journey Behind the Falls. On this journey, you’ll don a plastic poncho and traverse tunnels bored into the rock behind the great sheet water for a thunderous up-close view.Journey Behind the Falls consists of an observation platform and series of tunnels near the bottom of the Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian shore. The tunnels and platform can be reached by elevators from the street level entrance. You walk through two tunnels, which extend approximately 150 feet/46 meters behind the waterfall. When you reach the end of the tunnel, you can see water cascading in front of the open cave entrances. The best part is stepping out on the observation deck for the full experience. You will get very wet, but it’s worth it for the site of the roaring water.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Strokkur

The landmark Geysir Geyser might be the world’s most famous and the one after which all others are named, but its neighbor, Strokkur, is equally impressive. Despite only rising to heights of 60 to 100 feet (compared to Geysir’s 150 to 200 feet), Strokkur still erupts several times an hour (unlike Geysir, which remains largely dormant thanks to its clogged conduit) offering visitors a good chance of witnessing the natural spectacle. Opened up by an earthquake in 1789 and reactivated by human intervention in 1963 after being blocked by a second earthquake, Strokkur has been erupting regularly ever since. Cradled in a 3-meter wide crater, Strokkur’s highly anticipated eruptions begin with the formation of a pulsing bubble of hot water, which reaches temperatures of around 200 °C before a rush of steam breaks through and shoots into the air.

Learn More

Wildlife & Zoos

Aquarium of Genoa

Genoa is associated, understandably, with the sea. It's Italy's largest port city, and it's home to the Genoa Aquarium – Italy's largest aquarium, and one of the largest in Europe.The Aquarium of Genoa sits on the old harbor, the city's ancient port. When the area was redeveloped in the early 1990s to be less industrial and more appealing to visitors, the aquarium was part of that redevelopment project. The aquarium – along with the old port – was redesigned by famed architect Renzo Piano, himself from Genoa. It was opened in 1992, and today more than 1.2 million people visit every year.The Genoa Aquarium has 70 different tanks for visitors to check out, holding more than 1.6 million gallons of water and 12,000 animals. This aquarium is the only one in Europe to have some species of Antarctic fish on display, and a 1998 expansion means there's now a whole wing devoted to marine mammals – there's space for up to 10 dolphins.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Lake Nasser (Lake Nubia)

Named after the Egyptian President who started the process, Lake Nasser is a result of the construction of the Aswan High Dam which effectively modernised Egypt, doubling its electic supply and significantly increasing the amount of agricultural land. Between 1958 and 1970, the Nile River was dammed, causing much controversy, and forming Lake Nasser (83% of which is in Egypt, the rest lying in Sudan and called Lake Nubia). The lake is 340 miles (550 km) long, and 22 miles (35 km) across at its widest point. The lake covers the entire area which once housed Nubain villages containing hundreds of thousands of people. They were relocated to new areas and the Sudanese port and railway town of Wadi Halfa rebuilt. Today ferries cross the lake from Aswan to Wadi Halfa and this is the only connection between the two countries: there is no paved road link. The alternative is to fly. The lake is popular for Nile perch fishing and boating.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Uco Valley

Known as the Napa Valley of Argentina, Mendoza is Latin America’s largest wine-making region with more than 800 wineries. Uco Valley in particular is known for its malbecs, cabernet sauvignons, syrahs and ruby red tempranillos, which benefit from 250 sunny days a year, very little rain, fertile soil and a cool micro-climate where the average temperature is 57 degrees F. An hour’s drive southwest of the city of Mendoza, Uco Valley is a popular destination for travelers on the Argentina Wine Route. As well as producing the highest altitude (900-1,200 meters) wines in the province, the valley is renowned for its beauty. Covering 45 miles by 15 miles on the eastern slopes of the Andes, Uco Valley follows the northern course of the Tunuyan river as it flows down from the surrounding snow-capped peaks. As you visit the valley’s vineyards, looks out for almond trees and orchards too.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Chaxa Lagoon

Chaxa Lagoon (Laguna Chaxa) often serves as an introduction to the salt flat for visitors. The ground here is crusted with an inedible salt, and in the morning, a pinkish light comes over the horizon as the sun rises. While the crystalline ground is fascinating and curious, the wild flamingos in the area often turn heads. And the presence of flamingos should be no surprise, as the Chaxa Lagoon is one of the easiest entry points to Chile’s National Flamingo Reserve and a great place for photographers with good reflexes (and zoom, as the birds often keep their distance). As the pinkish light dissipates and the air warms up, packs of the birds take flight over the lake. Three different species often reside here: theChilean, Andean and James' flamingos. A variety of other birds can be seen here as well, including the Andean avocet, the puna plover and a type of sandpiper, a small bird with a long beak that feeds on small organisms in the mineral-rich water.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

South Mountain Park

You could think of Phoenix’s South Mountain Park as a large outdoor playground. Actually, a very large outdoor playground. With more than 16,000 acres to explore, according to the Trust for Public Land, South Mountain Park is one of the largest municipally operated parks in the United States. With more than 50 miles of trails, South Mountain Park is a favorite among horseback riders, hikers and mountain bikers. But drivers can take in the scenery too. A little more than five miles up the Summit Road, there are Valley wide views to be had at Dobbins Lookout. If you’re inspired, keep going to the Gila Lookout for a view of the Gila River Valley. The drive is scenic, so take it slow to safely enjoy the view. There are many steep sections and blind curves and cars share the road with bikers and hikers.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

El Morado Natural Monument

El Morado is the name given to one of the most popular hikes in Cajón de Maipo, an area that follows a narrow river valley south east of the city, heading up towards the Andes, and to Argentina. Along this serpentine road, there are loads of places to stop and eat everything from full meals to a traditional coffee and kuchen (German-style fruit pastry), and in the plaza in San José del Maipo (the main town), there are always handicrafts for sale. But further up the valley is the entrance to El Morado, a wide open uphill hike on which you can see the many striations of natural coloration in the rock, from red to brown to green and yellow. If you continue up, you arrive at the San Francisco Lagoon and Glacier. For those who have never seen a glacier before, it’s a stunning sight, and though you’ll probably want to dip a hand or foot in the milky glacial lagoon below just to say you did, you’ll probably quickly step away, as the water is at near freezing point.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Tayrona National Park (Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona)

Tayrona National Park, just 34 km from Santa Marta in northern Colombia, has abundant natural and archaeological attractions. Named after one of the most important indigenous tribes in Colombia’s history, the Tayrona National Park was established in 1969 with an area of 19,000 hectares. Eco-tourism is popular in this complex biological ecosystem. There are over 300 bird species, including the endangered Andean condor and woodpeckers. Puma, deer, bats, howling monkeys, iguanas, jaguars and marine turtles also call this forest home. Hikers can spot multicolored land crabs, reptiles and butterflies on the trails. To get to the beaches, visitors walk along marked trails or hire a guide with horses. Explore the many golden sand beaches and snorkel near coral reefs and underwater treasures hidden around the huge rock formations. The largest archeological remains in the park are found in Pueblito, an ancient commercial center used by the Tayrona Indians of the Sierra Nevada.

Learn More

Geological Formations

Alcantara Gorges (Gole dell'Alcantara)

A volcano can create some pretty interesting terrain, and Sicily’s Mt. Etna is no exception. Some of the geographic impacts of Mt. Etna aren’t even visible above ground, as is the case with some of the Alcantra Gorges. The Alcantra River runs from Mt. Nebrodi, roughly 32 miles inland from Taormina, and feeds into the Ionian Sea near Giardini-Naxos. Because the river runs through and around volcanic rock, it has carved some intricate paths along the way. Most of them are open and visible, while others snake underground.

Learn More

Scenic Landmarks

Monte Igueldo

One of the two headlands that bookend the sweep of San Sebastian’s sandy La Concha Bay, Monte Igueldo stands to the west of the town and is the perfect vantage point for panoramic views over the rocky islet of Santa Clara toward the hump of Monte Urgull at the east end of the beach.Rearing up at the end of La Concha Bay, steep Monte Igueldo can be ascended by car or on foot along the winding Paseo del Faro; alternatively a funicular runs up the hill from Plaza del Funicular, 4. Once up there, there are viewing terraces and a small theme park but most people just visit for the panoramas, which are especially wonderful at sunset as the lights of the town twinkle below. Although the amusement park won’t impress hardened Disney veterans, it has a certain passé charm and enough to entertain families with toddlers for a couple of hours, from bumper cars to carousels and gentle roller coasters as well as themed rides in the Pirate Park.

Learn More

Gardens & Parks

Cape Byron

Australia mainland's easternmost point of Cape Byron possesses a number of reasons to pay it a visit: the Cape Byron Light, the Cape Byron Marine Park, and the Cape Byron walking track. Set about 1.9 miles (3 km) northeast of the quaint Byron Bay, Cape Byron lies in the Cape Byron State Conservation Area. A day trip from Byron Bay can be spent first at the Cape Byron Light – a lighthouse that was opened in 1901 and is still in use today. A climb to the top, through the internal spiral staircase, brings visitors to a glorious viewing platform looking out across the Pacific Ocean, which is a prime place to catch whales, sea turtles, dolphins and other passing wildlife. Wildlife lovers will enjoy the many sheltered beaches and protected reefs that encompass the 54,000 acre Cape Byron Marine Park. Swimming, fishing (in some areas), kayaking and diving are all possible around Cape Byron.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Govetts Leap

In the 1930s, when early conservationists and Australian bushwalkers were lobbying for a National Park, you could argue that places like Govetts Leap ended up making it happen. With its sweeping view of the Grose Valley and swath of forested wilderness, Govetts Leap is often considered the most scenic Blue Mountains viewpoint. Surely, while standing at the top of the sheer rock face, and gazing out at the undulating hills that are completely covered in blue gum trees, lawmakers and bush walkers could all agree that this was a place to be saved.What makes the lookout so exceptionally stunning is 600-foot Bridal Veil Falls—the tallest single-drop waterfall found anywhere in the National Park. There is a narrow hiking trail that descends the cliff face down to the base of the falls, although the sheer drop-offs and steep climb make it a trail for serious hikers.

Learn More

Sights & Landmarks

Best Of All Lookout

True to its name, Best Of All Lookout has the best view in Springbrook National Park. Here, in this subtropical rainforest an hour from the Gold Coast, visitors will find an Antarctic Beech forest left over from the days of Gondwanaland, which in collection with the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia, is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage area for its unique geology and ecology. At Best Of All Lookout, visitors will peer out towards the peak of Mt Warning, which is famously known as Australia’s first place to greet the rising sun. From the viewing platform at Best Of All Lookout, the sandy coastline of Coolangatta can often be seen on clear days, as can the valleys of New South Wales that stretch all the way out towards the coast. Even though the hike to the lookout is short, keep an eye out for local wildlife like wallabies and curious padmelons, and since leeches and ticks are common in the area, be sure to wear long sleeves, pants, and boots to ward off the bush.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Avala Mountain (Planina Avala)

Located in the southeastern corner of Belgrade, Avala Mountain stands nearly 1,700 feet above sea level. The only mountain in the area, it features more than 600 plant species and has been protected since 1859 as a monument of nature. The mountain is made of serpentinite, limestone and magmatic rocks and is a source of lead and mercury ore, although mining activities ceased in the 1960s. Today, it is a favorite recreational spot for Belgrade residents and is home to several important monuments. The Monument to the Unknown Hero, built on the site of a medieval town called Avalski Grad, is dedicated to unknown soldiers from World War I. The Monument to the Soviet War Veterans honors members of the Soviet military who died in a plane crash on the mountain in 1964 and the Monument to Vasa Carapic remembers one of the leaders of the First Serbian Uprising in 1804. Avala Mountain is also the site of the tallest structure in Serbia: a 202-foot-tall television tower.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Arthur's Seat

Along with Calton Hill and Castle Rock, Arthur's Seat forms part of the ridge of cold volcanoes that give such drama to the Edinburgh skyline. The mountain sits in Holyrood Park, 650 acres (260 hectares) of wild parkland just a short walk from the Royal Mile. So you can be shopping for Argyle socks one moment and roaming around lochs and moorland the next! From some angles, the mini-mountain resembles a sleeping lion. It’s perhaps seen at its best in the mellow light of sunset.Arthur's Seat is no Everest, and if you want to climb it there are several easy ascents. If you're reasonably fit and keep striding you could make it in half an hour, but even if you're less fit or want to gaze at the scenery, an hour should take you to the top. Be careful on rainy days when the rocks are slippery.

Learn More

Places of Natural Beauty

Mt. Kinabalu (Gunung Kinabalu)

Mount Kinabalu towers over the eastern Malaysian state of Sabah. At 13,435ft (4,095m) above sea level, Mount Kinabalu is the 4th tallest mountain in the Malay Archipelago, drawing travelers the world over to climb its slopes in search of the perfect sunrise. But it’s not just for the views from its summit that travelers come to Mount Kinabalu. This UNESCO listed World Heritage Site is recognised as one of the most important biological sites in the world. An estimated 5,000 to 6,000 plant species call Mount Kinabalu, and its surrounding National Park, home. Many carnivorous plants and orchids grow on its slopes, which also attract 326 species of birds and over 100 mammals, including orangutans, Black shrews and the gloriously-named Bornean Ferret-Badger.

Learn More